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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1991 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UC Irvine researchers have received a $4.2-million grant from the National Cancer Institute to investigate whether large daily doses of two vitamins will prevent cancer in heavy cigarette smokers. The five-year study, one of the largest of its kind, will involve 4,300 Orange County volunteers who are being recruited from the ranks of healthy men and women, ages 50 to 69, who smoke regularly or used to smoke.
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IMAGE
September 23, 2012 | By Alexandra Drosu
Every few months a new beauty trend, treatment or potion is revealed - the latest skin-tightening laser, an age-defying ingredient or a longer-lasting filler. But should a fresh-faced 20-year-old be using retinol creams? And when is the right time to consider Botox? In the day of instant gratification, where do we draw the line between too soon and too late? We asked some experts for advice. The 20s In your 20s, wearing sunblock is the most important step you can take to prevent sun damage that leads to fine lines and wrinkles, says Dr. Simon Ourian, a dermatologist and founder of Epione Beverly Hills.
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August 27, 2009 | Stacie Stukin, Special to The Times
YOU MULTI-TASK all day -- text and drive, talk and type, drink water infused with vitamins. So why shouldn't your makeup do double-duty too? A new generation of foundations aims to do just that, promising more than an even skin tone and a dewy finish. Fortified with ingredients usually reserved for skin care products, these foundations say they can diminish fine lines and wrinkles, treat acne, firm the skin -- even help reverse aging. Some, including Peter Thomas Roth's new Un-Wrinkle Pressed Powder, contain a cocktail of active ingredients, including antioxidants and a synthetic version of snake venom that's actually called SNY-AKE (it claims a Botox-like effect, reducing wrinkles by inhibiting muscle movement)
IMAGE
August 27, 2009 | Stacie Stukin, Special to The Times
YOU MULTI-TASK all day -- text and drive, talk and type, drink water infused with vitamins. So why shouldn't your makeup do double-duty too? A new generation of foundations aims to do just that, promising more than an even skin tone and a dewy finish. Fortified with ingredients usually reserved for skin care products, these foundations say they can diminish fine lines and wrinkles, treat acne, firm the skin -- even help reverse aging. Some, including Peter Thomas Roth's new Un-Wrinkle Pressed Powder, contain a cocktail of active ingredients, including antioxidants and a synthetic version of snake venom that's actually called SNY-AKE (it claims a Botox-like effect, reducing wrinkles by inhibiting muscle movement)
IMAGE
September 23, 2012 | By Alexandra Drosu
Every few months a new beauty trend, treatment or potion is revealed - the latest skin-tightening laser, an age-defying ingredient or a longer-lasting filler. But should a fresh-faced 20-year-old be using retinol creams? And when is the right time to consider Botox? In the day of instant gratification, where do we draw the line between too soon and too late? We asked some experts for advice. The 20s In your 20s, wearing sunblock is the most important step you can take to prevent sun damage that leads to fine lines and wrinkles, says Dr. Simon Ourian, a dermatologist and founder of Epione Beverly Hills.
HEALTH
June 25, 2007 | Tom Graham, Washington Post
A small study has shown it may be possible to reverse somewhat the wrinkling of old age. The research suggests that topical application of retinol, a form of vitamin A, could make older people less prone to skin ulcerations and poor healing of wounds. Three dozen white people -- average age, 87 -- had a skin moisturizer laced with retinol applied to one of their inner arms a couple of times a week for six months; a placebo was applied to the other arm.
HEALTH
December 16, 2002 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Today's skin-care products do more than just clean and moisturize: They promise smoother, clearer, more radiant skin with fewer fine lines and wrinkles. But there's a downside to some of the ingredients. A seemingly endless array of creams, lotions and cleansers use alpha hydroxy acids to improve skin texture and make it firmer by thickening the collagen beneath the surface. But these acids also can make the skin more sensitive to the ravages of the sun.
WORLD
June 13, 2007 | Alicia Lozano, Times Staff Writer
When hope comes in a $30 bottle, people start to lose their cool. And when a respectable news program hypes it as a potential antidote to aging, they may even go crazy. Take the curious case of Britain's new cult-favorite skincare line, Boots' No. 7. When the homely brand first introduced its Protect & Perfect anti-aging serum two years ago in Britain, consumers hardly took notice. That all changed when the BBC broadcast a special report on beauty products in March.
NEWS
March 21, 1989
Researchers from Iowa State University have come up with a water-soluble form of Vitamin A that they say is easily absorbed by the body and is safer for treatment of acne and wrinkles than other approved forms. The findings of their research into Vitamin A, also called retinol, were reported at a meeting of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology in New Orleans.
IMAGE
May 3, 2009 | Alexandra Drosu
Maybe we can blame snakes for our wrinkles. After all, as the story goes, it was a snake that tempted Eve, getting her expelled from Eden and doomed to a mortal life filled with fine lines and wrinkles. So isn't it about time that the slithering serpent made amends? More than a half-dozen skin-care companies think so, incorporating a synthetic venom into their formulations to help diminish signs of aging. The products sprang from an "aha!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1991 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UC Irvine researchers have received a $4.2-million grant from the National Cancer Institute to investigate whether large daily doses of two vitamins will prevent cancer in heavy cigarette smokers. The five-year study, one of the largest of its kind, will involve 4,300 Orange County volunteers who are being recruited from the ranks of healthy men and women, ages 50 to 69, who smoke regularly or used to smoke.
NEWS
January 2, 2002 | From Associated Press
Too much vitamin A may increase the risk of hip fractures in older women, according to a study researchers say suggests the need to reevaluate the levels in supplements and fortified food. Vitamin A is important for such things as healthy skin and hair and bone growth. But in the study published in Wednesday's Journal of the American Medical Assn.
NEWS
September 15, 1993 | From Associated Press
Daily doses of beta carotene, Vitamin E and selenium reduced cancer deaths by 13% in a study conducted in rural China by U.S. researchers, who caution that the results may not apply to the United States, where people eat a more well-balanced diet. The five-year study, involving 29,584 people in an area where cancer rates are among the highest in the world, showed that some vitamins and minerals can be of benefit against cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute researchers.
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