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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1986 | JUAN ARANCIBIA, Times Staff Writer
The new president of the American Assn. of Retired Persons vowed Wednesday to continue pressing the government for social programs to cope with the growing number of senior citizens. John T. Denning told the AARP's national convention at the Anaheim Convention Center that the growing population of senior citizens is forcing the nation to consider long-range social programs as more people become dependent on aid.
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NEWS
November 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Horace B. Deets, the longtime executive director of AARP, is to retire from the influential advocacy group for older Americans, effective Jan. 1, 2002. AARP, formerly known as the American Assn. of Retired Persons, has more than 30 million members and lobbies the government on Social Security, Medicare and other health care issues. Deets, 62, joined the organization 25 years ago and has been executive director since 1988.
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NEWS
May 22, 1986
Dr. Ruth Westheimer, Ann Landers, Louis Rukeyser, Eric Sevareid and Carl Sagan are among the speakers scheduled to appear at the American Assn. of Retired Persons biennial convention Tuesday through Thursday at the Anaheim Convention Center. More than 25,000 people are expected to attend the free three-day convention sponsored by AARP, a 22-million-member national association dedicated "to helping older Americans achieve lives of dignity, purpose and independence."
BUSINESS
December 5, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Philip Morris Cos., the world's largest cigarette company, said Friday it named Paul Hendrys to head its fast-growing international tobacco unit, replacing Andreas Gembler. Gembler, 55, is a 30-year veteran at Philip Morris and is retiring for personal reasons, the company said. He had headed the unit since April 1997. Hendrys, 51, joined Philip Morris in 1980 in Germany, and built it into one of the company's most profitable markets outside the U.S. His appointment becomes effective Feb. 1.
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | ROBYN LOEWENTHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Last week with deadlines staring me in the face, I fled to the drugstore for food and rental videos. But this column was still on my mind. So when Henry, my professor friend, spotted me enjoying a surreptitious ice cream cone, I spilled my guilty journalist's guts. "Henry," I said, "did you know that the American Assn. of Retired Persons is considered the country's oldest and largest organization? It has over 32 million members." He was impressed.
MAGAZINE
February 12, 1989 | DAVID DEVOSS, David DeVoss is a staff writer for this magazine.
THE WEST COAST HEADQUARTERS of the American Assn. of Retired Persons is a three-story, matte-white complex in Lakewood. Its discreet corner logo and its giant parking lot blend into the surrounding business-park, suburban landscape. Like the interest group it represents, AARP at first glance is, well, retiring. Inside, however, the organization's real dimensions take shape.
NEWS
November 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Horace B. Deets, the longtime executive director of AARP, is to retire from the influential advocacy group for older Americans, effective Jan. 1, 2002. AARP, formerly known as the American Assn. of Retired Persons, has more than 30 million members and lobbies the government on Social Security, Medicare and other health care issues. Deets, 62, joined the organization 25 years ago and has been executive director since 1988.
MAGAZINE
April 11, 1993
As one of those "golden oldies," I completely agree with D'Antonio. Affluent senior citizens take advantage of the same medical benefits as the poor. Yet in 1988, those better-offs, through the American Association of Retired Persons, defeated the catastrophic care bill because it was going to cost $1,200 per couple a year. Have these folks priced private, long-term care insurance? MARY MEYER Pasadena
TRAVEL
August 9, 1992
What a nice plug Bill Hughes gave to cruises by the American Assn. of Retired Persons ("Educational Cruises to Exotic Locales," July 26). However, as a member of that organization, I have found that their trips are terribly expensive and that I can do better by making my own arrangements. AARP has become big business, and I'm about to drop out of it for that reason. TULA GINZBURG Los Angeles
OPINION
February 5, 1989
We hope congressional leaders do stand firm on the Medicare expansion laws. We cannot understand the blindness of our fellow-Medicare recipients. The additional services, added to the comparatively generous Medicare coverage, should be financed by the beneficiaries themselves. And this is being handled in an equitable manner based on ability to pay, and will not unfairly burden the indigent. If these dissenters would stop and compare costs of the new law against prior Medicare coverage along with private supplementary insurance, or even the total private medical insurance without Medicare, they would realize what a bargain this plan is. In addition, we hope that the American Assn.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1997 | DIANE SEO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Doris Drucker still has that hankering, the same creative passion that drives millions of other inventors to try to turn their ideas into something tangible, useful and maybe even profitable. So what if she's eightysomething? Like a growing number of other senior citizens, the former patent agent and wife of prominent management scholar Peter Drucker couldn't be happier forgoing a leisurely retirement to launch her own business and market her latest invention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was alienated from her parents, protested the Vietnam War, smoked pot, lived with her boyfriend--and voted for George Bush in the last presidential election. So what else would you expect from a person whose birth signaled the arrival of the Baby Boom generation? Nancy Edwards of Duarte doesn't see anything unusual about the way she grew up. Or the way she is growing old.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1995 | From Associated Press
A new study finds wide disparities in wealth distribution and suggests that many Americans will not be able to retain their standard of living in retirement. Economist James P. Smith of the Santa Monica-based Rand Corp. said the biggest surprise in his study is "how little the average household has accumulated." Many Americans, he said, "simply have engaged in very little savings."
MAGAZINE
April 11, 1993
As one of those "golden oldies," I completely agree with D'Antonio. Affluent senior citizens take advantage of the same medical benefits as the poor. Yet in 1988, those better-offs, through the American Association of Retired Persons, defeated the catastrophic care bill because it was going to cost $1,200 per couple a year. Have these folks priced private, long-term care insurance? MARY MEYER Pasadena
TRAVEL
August 9, 1992
What a nice plug Bill Hughes gave to cruises by the American Assn. of Retired Persons ("Educational Cruises to Exotic Locales," July 26). However, as a member of that organization, I have found that their trips are terribly expensive and that I can do better by making my own arrangements. AARP has become big business, and I'm about to drop out of it for that reason. TULA GINZBURG Los Angeles
NEWS
October 21, 1991 | ANN CONWAY
"Then there's the one about Frank Sinatra . . . " Ed McMahon--wine connoisseur, gourmand, for almost 30 years Johnny Carson's aide-de-camp--is talking about the toast he gives every time he hails the grape, "To the festival! To the incredible festival of life!" The salute is so well known, McMahon says from a phone in his Beverly Hills home, it's almost a password among pals. Take the time Sinatra called during a telethon McMahon was hosting.
MAGAZINE
April 9, 1989
Your toadying article on the American Assn. of Retired Persons ("Empire of the Old," by David DeVoss, Feb. 12) was sickening. This is the group that supported the Catastrophic Coverage Act and was responsible in great part for its passing. This detrimental act is costing seniors millions of dollars in extra taxes each year at rates to increase annually. AARP is also the organization that was against equitable Social Security payments for "notch babies" (born 1917-1921), who can get $100 less monthly than those born before or after.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1990
As a Social Security recipient and senior citizen, it is with increasing amazement that I note the severity of the greed characteristic that appears to be a natural evolution of the aging process. There is no question that there are needy recipients of Social Security who, because of a lack of intelligence, hard work, frugality or just plain luck, depend on only this income, which is barely adequate. The majority, however, have some savings, extra income and a place to live that is either paid for or close to it. These are the ones who scream the loudest using the logic that it is their "just due."
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | ROBYN LOEWENTHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To serve, not to be served. Motto of AARP When Ethel Percy Andrus established the American Assn. of Retired Persons in 1958, she sought to improve the quality of life and the role of older people in society. And events since the educator's death in 1967 have refuted Shakespeare's dictum--the good that people do "is oft interred with their bones."
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | ROBYN LOEWENTHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Last week with deadlines staring me in the face, I fled to the drugstore for food and rental videos. But this column was still on my mind. So when Henry, my professor friend, spotted me enjoying a surreptitious ice cream cone, I spilled my guilty journalist's guts. "Henry," I said, "did you know that the American Assn. of Retired Persons is considered the country's oldest and largest organization? It has over 32 million members." He was impressed.
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