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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2012 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
A group of Stockton retirees has filed suit in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Sacramento asking for a restraining order against the city's moves to cut their health benefits. The city informed retirees by letter that they must pay their premiums by July 30 or "medical coverage will be canceled retroactive to July 1. " The move is part of the city's "pendency plan" aimed at keeping it solvent while it seeks protections from creditors under federal bankruptcy law. Plaintiff Alfred Seibel, 58, a retired parks worker, said he can't afford the premiums and can't afford to lose coverage.
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BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By Donie Vanitzian
Question: Thinking this would be cost-effective housing, I bought a condo in the Riverside County area. Since then I've asked the board to repair my unit's balcony railing numerous times to no avail. Six years later, I received a notification that the balconies on all 96 units must be repaired, costing each owner more than $3,000. I have no say in the way things are done around here. This homeowner association has wasted thousands of dollars on repeated cosmetic primping like painting, parking lot slurry seal, landscape and more.
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NATIONAL
January 19, 2012 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
They amble in every morning to the back table, shake hands and sit beneath the sign saying "B.S. Community table," which, depending on whom you ask, either stands for Bible study or another kind of B.S. This morning, the nine or so people at the diner are talking politics as they lean over cheese-covered grits, thick omelets and triangles of toast covered in butter. "When I was in the service, I remember when we were worrying about China. Now we're asking them for money?" says Cecil Wright, 84, the eldest member of this group of retirees, shaking his head.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Anky van Deursen
Question: I have lived in Silicon Valley my whole life. I am 70 years old and retired. I recently applied for housing at an apartment complex and asked the leasing agent what my chances were of getting an apartment. He told me they had received a lot of applications. When I asked if it was worth it to apply at all, he shrugged and said I was "up against some Google people. " I was outraged. Am I being discriminated against, since he implied that I did not stand a chance of being chosen over a person who works for Google?
SPORTS
March 28, 2011 | Bill Dwyre
They are rebels with a cause. In their playing days, the NFL taught them to be competitors, never to go down without a fight. And so, in a quiet meeting room last weekend, away from the madding crowds of a Las Vegas casino, they got mad all over again. They have lost their youth but not their spunk. There are an estimated 21,000 NFL retirees. There are several groups that represent them, each with an agenda built around anger for the National Football League. This group was the Independent Football Veterans Inc. PHOTOS: The NFL and head injuries Visualize large men in broken bodies and listen to them as they talk about how the hits of yesteryear affect them now: Dave Pear, 57, veteran of six years and three NFL teams: "I played for the Raiders with a herniated disk in my neck.
OPINION
September 29, 2006
Re "Employers Chip Away at Retiree Health Benefits," Sept. 26 If a company cheats its customers to improve profits, the customers can buy from another company. If a company cheats its employees to reduce expenses, the employees can work elsewhere. But when a company decides to reduce expenses by cheating its retirees, what can the retirees do? It's too late to retire from somewhere else. How about if the giant corporations contemplating cutting back retiree benefits reduce expenses by selling a few of their corporate jets?
BUSINESS
June 22, 2003
Many will find it ironic that Boeing Co. is playing the ethics card ("Boeing Goes on Offensive in Ad Campaign," June 9) in view of the company's record of breaking promises to thousands of retirees. While management is in the mood to defend its record of "integrity and fairness" and to "strive to reinforce a culture where business is conducted honestly," it would be a good time for it to go ahead and restore the retiree health-care benefit so many of us relied upon after long careers.
SPORTS
February 4, 2012 | BILL DWYRE
Sunday, on the most sacred day of the football year, there will be several thousand older men with gnarled fingers and replaced hips watching with mixed emotions. Mostly, for the four hours or so it will take to get through the game and any accompanying halftime wardrobe malfunctions, they will swell with pride. The Super Bowl is their legacy. Part of the time, they will just swell -- ankles, knees, hips, wrists. If there is a body joint, it will have fluid on it. It is a condition of having played in the NFL. They knew, going in, that this wasn't tap dancing, that they'd get hit a lot and hurt a lot. The game is tackling and being tackled.
WORLD
July 4, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
They were two old friends catching up over coffee, retirees swapping stories and gasping at the unfolding nuclear nightmare at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant. But instead of merely throwing their hands up over the disaster that shook the plant in the wake of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, Nobuhiro Shiotani and Yasuteru Yamada, both 72-year-old scientists, decided they could do something to help. They devised a plan that some have called heroic, others misguided and suicidal.
OPINION
June 13, 2007
Re "Making retirees' second act a class act," June 9 I chose to teach as a second career and have found it rewarding. I would encourage others to do so as well. However, before retirees go into teaching, they should be fully informed of what they stand to lose in Social Security benefits. Teachers in California and several other states are subject to a Social Security offset because of the pension received by the State Teachers' Retirement System. Perhaps Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sherry Lansing could campaign for the offset elimination as part of their attempt to lure second-career teachers into public service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | By Bob Pool
Officials kept their cool as they turned up the heat to finish construction of a new central utility plant in the middle of Los Angeles International Airport. LAX operators invited retired plant engineers to return and help run the old heating and cooling plant while current engineers were being trained to operate a new $438-million facility. On Tuesday, the retirees will be on hand at noon when 79-year-old former chief building operating engineer Walt Garrick flips the switch to shut down the old plant, which has been in continuous operation keeping airport passengers and workers comfortable since 1961.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- While lawmakers begin discussing ways to fix California's cash-strapped teacher pension system, another long-term financial problem continues to fester. The cost of providing healthcare to retired state workers is $64.6 billion more than state leaders have set aside to pay, an increase of $730 million from the previous year. The new numbers, calculated as of last June, were released by state Controller John Chiang on Thursday. “While most are focused on unfunded pension obligations, this is a sleeper problem that can become the next big fiscal threat if we continue to do nothing," he said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By Catherine Saillant, Maloy Moore and Doug Smith
Approaching retirement, Ventura County Chief Executive Marty Robinson was earning $228,000 a year. To boost her pension, which would be based on her final salary, Robinson cashed out nearly $34,000 in unused vacation pay, an $11,000 bonus for having earned a graduate degree and more than $24,000 in extra pension benefits the county owed her. By the time she walked out the door last year, her pension was calculated at $272,000 a...
NATIONAL
February 21, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
Detroit hopes to emerge from bankruptcy this year in part by significantly cutting city workers' pensions and payments to bondholders, according to a blueprint filed Friday to restructure the city's $18-billion debt. Detroit is to invest $1.5 billion over a decade to provide basic services, attract new residents and businesses, reduce crime and demolish blighted properties, according to a statement explaining the plan for the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history. “The plan contemplates the city's emergence from Chapter 9 this year and represents a crucial step toward the city's rehabilitation and recovery from a decades-long downward spiral,” the statement said.
OPINION
December 4, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
A judge's ruling Tuesday that the city of Detroit's bankruptcy case may go forward - and that its pension obligations are not entitled to special protection but can be reduced, along with other debts - sends a chilly message to workers in California, where Stockton and San Bernardino are moving through the Chapter 9 bankruptcy process and other cities are struggling with their costs and revenues. The decision makes it clear, if it wasn't previously, that the promise of full retirement pay for municipal employees is directly dependent on the continuing solvency and sound financial planning and management of cities.
WORLD
November 20, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - An 85-year-old tourist from Palo Alto was buckled in his seat last month on a plane preparing to depart Pyongyang, North Korea, when a flight attendant pointed him out to two men in uniform. They promptly escorted him off the plane. The man, Merrill Newman, a retired financial executive and Korean War veteran, has not been heard from since. Newman was seized Oct. 26 at Pyongyang's Sunan International Airport, but the case was initially kept secret at the urging of his family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1998
Re "Bigger Check for County Staff Retirees," July 14: Isn't it amazing that one government inanity (judge) granted increased benefits to government and county retirees? The common bond among government employees to maximize their retirement higher than in the private sector is well in place. Having worked for a government agency, I encountered the greed and a lack of not having to make a profit for benefits that creates a system of take and not give. It is time that the compensation for government workers be adjusted to the private sector.
NEWS
October 6, 1987 | Associated Press
The Pentagon, concerned about rising health insurance costs, said Monday it has ordered military hospitals to treat more dependents of servicemen and retirees instead of sending them to civilian facilities. The decision, which was outlined in a memorandum sent Sept. 25 to the secretaries of the Air Force, Navy and Army, is part of a new effort called "Project Restore," created by Dr. William Mayer, assistant defense secretary for health affairs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2013 | Robin Abcarian
Maybe too much sex has addled Suzanne Somers' brain. In a much-mocked essay published by the Wall Street Journal on Monday, the 67-year-old self-help author and  star of the 1970s TV show “Three's Company” held forth on what she believes are the evils of Obamacare and the terrible effects it will have on retirees. She didn't really use facts, as such, or even logic, as such. Instead, using personal anecdotes about relatives and friends in Canada, a misremembered newsmagazine headline and apparently fabricated quotes by Stalin and Churchill, she maintained that Obamacare is a “socialist Ponzi scheme.” Here's a bit of what she wrote: “Affordable care will allow for preexisting conditions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - He shot squirrels in the head so their bodies would be intact for meals. He caught frogs, lizards and a two-foot brown snake, killing them with a rock and toasting them thoroughly so he would not get salmonella. Each night, before burying himself under rotting leaves, he carefully covered his fire with gravel to prevent it from spreading. Gene Penaflor made it through 19 days lost in the wilds of Northern California's Mendocino National Forest by going into "survival mode," his son, Gale Penaflor, 37, said Monday.
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