Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRetirement Finances
IN THE NEWS

Retirement Finances

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 9, 1993 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
A startling survey by Wall Street giant Merrill Lynch recently found that more than half of all Americans haven't saved a nickel for their retirement. And the survey was only the latest in a growing body of evidence that indicates the gilding is falling from the "golden years." Indeed, other surveys say that roughly eight out of 10 Americans--some 76 million households--will have less than half the income they need to retire comfortably.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 13, 2011 | By Kelly Barron
After 30 years as a special-needs teacher in public schools, Patricia Ricci looked forward to spending retirement days outside, gardening in the half-acre backyard of her historic home in Orange. "I didn't want to drop dead with a felt-tip marker in my hand," said Ricci, 67. Her retirement was a race against time. In 2000, Ricci was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. The disease often takes a couple of decades before the onset of severely crippling symptoms, and Ricci wanted to make sure she would have several active years after retiring.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
September 24, 1996 | Barbara Murphy
Conejo Valley Adult School is offering a four-part workshop on financial strategies for successful retirement. The workshop, to be held at the Waverly Adult Education Center in Thousand Oaks, will include such topics as how to generate a steady income, protect your assets from erosion, minimize taxes and provide a secure retirement for yourself and your spouse. The workshop is designed for retired individuals and couples, or those planning to retire in the next five to 10 years.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2010 | Liz Pulliam Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: I'm facing the end of child support and need to finance my son's college education, plus I have some home maintenance costs looming. Should I get a home equity loan or line of credit (assuming I can qualify) to pay off these pressures, or should I raid my retirement fund? I am 60, make about $80,000 a year and have no debt besides the mortgage and a car loan, but I have only about $100,000 in retirement accounts. (I had to wipe out my savings once before in a two-year spell of unemployment.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2000 | SUZY HAGSTROM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nina Cross Brazelton still thinks of herself as a "poor, struggling" retired schoolteacher--even though she is a millionaire. This misperception costs Brazelton in terms of both time and money. Despite a net worth of $1.5 million and annual income that exceeds $80,000, the 74-year-old Santa Ana resident is so worried about running out of cash that she returned to work to save more.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2010 | Liz Pulliam Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: I'm facing the end of child support and need to finance my son's college education, plus I have some home maintenance costs looming. Should I get a home equity loan or line of credit (assuming I can qualify) to pay off these pressures, or should I raid my retirement fund? I am 60, make about $80,000 a year and have no debt besides the mortgage and a car loan, but I have only about $100,000 in retirement accounts. (I had to wipe out my savings once before in a two-year spell of unemployment.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2011 | By Kelly Barron
After 30 years as a special-needs teacher in public schools, Patricia Ricci looked forward to spending retirement days outside, gardening in the half-acre backyard of her historic home in Orange. "I didn't want to drop dead with a felt-tip marker in my hand," said Ricci, 67. Her retirement was a race against time. In 2000, Ricci was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. The disease often takes a couple of decades before the onset of severely crippling symptoms, and Ricci wanted to make sure she would have several active years after retiring.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing the threat of continued budget problems and pay cuts, state workers are taking advantage of a more generous pension plan and are retiring in record numbers. Nearly 7,200 state employees have either retired or applied to leave state service by the end of October, officials of the California Public Employees Retirement system disclosed Wednesday. The system reported that there were 4,859 retirements during the previous 12 months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1994 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dan Waters thought retirement would put an end to the controversies that encircled him as general manager of the city Department of Water and Power. He was wrong. Even as he skis, travels and relaxes at home, Waters and the DWP are coming under fire for employing a method that allows him to cash in on 1,044 hours in compensatory time he accrued during his tenure at the city-owned utility. That translates to about $75,000.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ and DAVID W. MYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Carl E. Reichardt, one of the banking industry's most colorful figures, announced unexpectedly Tuesday that he is retiring early as chairman and chief executive of Wells Fargo & Co., a financial institution he has headed for 11 years through good times and bad. Reichardt, who just turned 63, will be succeeded at year's end by 52-year-old Paul Hazen, president of San Francisco-based Wells Fargo and its primary unit, Wells Fargo Bank.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2002 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans are approaching retirement with a combination of inadequate savings and unrealistic expectations about their standard of living after they quit working, according to a new survey. Although fewer Americans are saving and planning for retirement in 2002 than in the past, 70% said they were very or somewhat confident that they would have enough savings to live comfortably, according to the annual Retirement Confidence Survey by the Employee Benefit Research Institute.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2000 | SUZY HAGSTROM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nina Cross Brazelton still thinks of herself as a "poor, struggling" retired schoolteacher--even though she is a millionaire. This misperception costs Brazelton in terms of both time and money. Despite a net worth of $1.5 million and annual income that exceeds $80,000, the 74-year-old Santa Ana resident is so worried about running out of cash that she returned to work to save more.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1996 | Barbara Murphy
Conejo Valley Adult School is offering a four-part workshop on financial strategies for successful retirement. The workshop, to be held at the Waverly Adult Education Center in Thousand Oaks, will include such topics as how to generate a steady income, protect your assets from erosion, minimize taxes and provide a secure retirement for yourself and your spouse. The workshop is designed for retired individuals and couples, or those planning to retire in the next five to 10 years.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ and DAVID W. MYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Carl E. Reichardt, one of the banking industry's most colorful figures, announced unexpectedly Tuesday that he is retiring early as chairman and chief executive of Wells Fargo & Co., a financial institution he has headed for 11 years through good times and bad. Reichardt, who just turned 63, will be succeeded at year's end by 52-year-old Paul Hazen, president of San Francisco-based Wells Fargo and its primary unit, Wells Fargo Bank.
NEWS
March 31, 1994 | CHRISTINE DUGAS, NEWSDAY
"Every time I go on vacation and sit under a palm tree, I think, 'Wouldn't it be great to do this forever?' " said Lee Rosenberg, co-founder of ARS Financial Services in Valley Stream, N.Y. "Then I get depressed because in a week, I'm back in the rat race." Sound familiar? Unfortunately, if you're not setting aside enough money now, you may never be able to afford to retire to a tropical island.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1994 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dan Waters thought retirement would put an end to the controversies that encircled him as general manager of the city Department of Water and Power. He was wrong. Even as he skis, travels and relaxes at home, Waters and the DWP are coming under fire for employing a method that allows him to cash in on 1,044 hours in compensatory time he accrued during his tenure at the city-owned utility. That translates to about $75,000.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2002 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans are approaching retirement with a combination of inadequate savings and unrealistic expectations about their standard of living after they quit working, according to a new survey. Although fewer Americans are saving and planning for retirement in 2002 than in the past, 70% said they were very or somewhat confident that they would have enough savings to live comfortably, according to the annual Retirement Confidence Survey by the Employee Benefit Research Institute.
NEWS
March 31, 1994 | CHRISTINE DUGAS, NEWSDAY
"Every time I go on vacation and sit under a palm tree, I think, 'Wouldn't it be great to do this forever?' " said Lee Rosenberg, co-founder of ARS Financial Services in Valley Stream, N.Y. "Then I get depressed because in a week, I'm back in the rat race." Sound familiar? Unfortunately, if you're not setting aside enough money now, you may never be able to afford to retire to a tropical island.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1993 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
A startling survey by Wall Street giant Merrill Lynch recently found that more than half of all Americans haven't saved a nickel for their retirement. And the survey was only the latest in a growing body of evidence that indicates the gilding is falling from the "golden years." Indeed, other surveys say that roughly eight out of 10 Americans--some 76 million households--will have less than half the income they need to retire comfortably.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing the threat of continued budget problems and pay cuts, state workers are taking advantage of a more generous pension plan and are retiring in record numbers. Nearly 7,200 state employees have either retired or applied to leave state service by the end of October, officials of the California Public Employees Retirement system disclosed Wednesday. The system reported that there were 4,859 retirements during the previous 12 months.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|