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NEWS
March 20, 1998 | From Associated Press
A white former police officer whose murder conviction in the beating death of a black motorist was thrown out because the jury watched "Malcolm X" during its free time was found guilty of manslaughter Thursday at his retrial. Walter Budzyn, 52, declined to comment and showed the same steely expression he has kept throughout the monthlong trial in the death of Malice Green. Budzyn's lawyer promised an appeal even though prosecutors said he might be sentenced to time already served.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Jeff Gottlieb
Five former Bell council members - all convicted but facing retrial on additional corruption-related charges - must decide Thursday whether to take a plea bargain that could put them behind bars for up to four years. The Los Angeles district attorney's office offered the deal on the condition that George Cole, Oscar Hernandez, Teresa Jacobo, Victor Bello and George Mirabal each agree to it. If not all of them sign off on the deal, the offer would be taken off the table and the former city leaders would head to a second trial with a judge who has indicated repeatedly that she has grown weary of the 2010 Bell salary scandal.
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NEWS
April 27, 2000 | Associated Press
A man sentenced to 16 years in prison for swiping a Snickers candy bar will be retried after a judge found evidence of jury misconduct during his trial. Visiting Judge Gene Ater ordered the new trial Tuesday for Kenneth Payne III, 29. Payne, who has 10 prior convictions, including three felonies, was tried as a habitual offender. He was on parole for stealing a bag of Oreo cookies when he stole the $1 candy bar in December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- A jury Friday acquitted a mentally ill transient and petty thief in the 1998 slaying of a 12-year-old girl in her bed in Escondido. In 2004 a jury had convicted Richard Tuite, now 44, of voluntary manslaughter in the case. But an appellate court last year overturned the verdict and ordered a retrial on that charge. Tuite smiled but otherwise showed little emotion when the retrial verdict was announced. The San Diego County Superior Court jury had begun deliberations Wednesday afternoon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2000 | ANN L. KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A convicted cop killer who spent 16 years awaiting his execution before winning a new trial was ordered back to death row Friday. Orange County Superior Court Judge John Ryan called the murder "cold-blooded" before he affirmed a jury's recommendation that John George Brown, 53, be returned to death row for the 1980 slaying of a Garden Grove police officer. Reed's widow, Linda, and his sister, Suzanne Reed Schumacher, read statements before the sentencing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1997 | MAYRAV SAAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The heir to the Schlitz beer fortune is on trial in Santa Monica facing multiple sex offense charges, including charges of assaulting his daughter, who was 4 at the time. Walter David Tallmadge, 65, the great-grandson of former Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co. President Henry Uihlein, has been held in the Los Angeles County Jail since 1995, charged with 15 counts of sexually assaulting two children--his daughter and a 19-year-old friend of the family.
NEWS
April 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
A federal appeals court on Friday rejected Timothy J. McVeigh's request to bar the judge who presided over his murder case from considering his bid for a new trial. The U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals declined to issue an emergency order removing U.S. District Judge Richard P. Matsch from the case, saying the convicted Oklahoma City bomber failed to show there was any reason to believe Matsch would be predisposed to reject his argument.
NEWS
April 19, 2000 | From Reuters
A white former police officer, whose second-degree murder conviction had been thrown out, was convicted of involuntary manslaughter Tuesday in his retrial in the 1992 beating death of a black motorist. Former Detroit officer Larry Nevers admitted striking Malice Green after a traffic stop on Nov. 5, 1992, but claimed he acted in self-defense. He faces up to 15 years in prison on the conviction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
A track coach from El Toro High School will be retried on charges that he molested five students at the school, a prosecutor said Friday. Jurors deadlocked on all 11 counts in the first trial of Vernon Brent Smith, 51. Smith is accused of fondling five girls, ages 15 to 17, in 1996 and 1997 while he was assistant coach at El Toro High. Deputy Dist. Atty. Scott Simmons said he expects to put on essentially the same evidence during the second trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1998 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unprecedented decision, a Superior Court judge on Friday ordered a record fourth death penalty trial for a 24-year-old man who killed his parents and younger brother, then set them on fire. The decision by Judge William R. Froeberg came five weeks after a third jury deadlocked Jan. 29 on the question of whether Edward Charles III should be put to death.
NATIONAL
November 28, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
A Florida woman who became a cause celebre for civil-rights activists after she received a 20-year prison sentence for firing a warning shot has been released on house arrest this week as she awaits another trial. Marissa Alexander's supporters said that she was at home for Thanksgiving with her children Thursday after she was released on $200,000 bond following a judge's ruling on Wednesday. Alexander's sentence, which she received after she unsuccessfully invoked Florida's "stand your ground" law, came to prominence after the nation was gripped by the Trayvon Martin case, in which George Zimmerman was acquitted of murder after shooting the unarmed 17-year-old.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Apple and Samsung were back in a San Jose federal court Wednesay for a new trial to determine just how much damages should be awarded in their epic patent litigation.  Last year, a jury ruled that 13 of Samsung's mobile devices had violated Apple patents for the iPhone and iPad and that Samsung should pay Apple more than $1 billion in damages. PHOTOS: Google barge to be 'unprecedented artistic structure' However, U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh later shaved $450 million off that verdict, saying instructions to the jury had been confusing.  Samsung still must pay $600 million as a result of the verdict.
WORLD
August 29, 2013 | By Zulfiqar Ali and Mark Magnier
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - A Pakistani appeals court on Thursday overturned the 33-year jail sentence of Shakeel Afridi, a doctor widely credited with helping the CIA track down Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, who was killed by U.S. Navy SEALs in 2011. Afridi remains in the central jail in Peshawar, where the appeal was heard, while awaiting a new trial. U.S. officials consider Afridi a hero for his assistance, and his arrest and harsh sentence for allegedly helping militants further strained ties between Washington and Islamabad already damaged by the Bin Laden raid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
Dale Hurd's children don't call him 'Dad' anymore. Not since he killed their mother. Hurd's son and daughter were at home when he shot a bullet into his estranged wife's heart. Charlie, four years old at the time, said he saw his mother stagger down the stairway, screaming, before collapsing in the hallway of the family's Culver City home. On Wednesday, Hurd, 63, was sentenced in a downtown courtroom to life in prison without the possibility of parole for the murder of Beatrice Hurd.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Conservatives have argued for years that the American Civil Liberties Union is willing to subordinate its core mission to liberal politics. It's an overstated indictment and there are lots of counter-examples, such as the ACLU's opposition on free-speech grounds to limitations on political spending. But it's also true that ACLU officials and members trend left, and this sometimes creates confusion. Politico has an interesting story on the mixed signals ACLU officials sent about whether the Justice Department should file federal civil rights charges against George Zimmerman in the death of Trayvon Martin.
WORLD
May 21, 2013 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - The Guatemalan high court's decision to annul the genocide conviction of former military dictator Efrain Rios Montt on Tuesday revived questions about his responsibility for the slaughter of some 1,700 ethnic Maya people. The ruling late Monday, which voided Rios Montt's May 10 conviction, also raises questions about the kind of retrial he might have and about a judicial system that has long been considered weak, corrupt, prone to impunity and susceptible to pressure from powerful outside forces.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1998 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The district attorney's office announced Friday that it will seek an unprecedented fourth death penalty trial for Edward Charles III, who murdered his parents and younger brother before setting their bodies on fire in the family's car. Deputy Dist. Atty. David Brent said the decision was based on the egregiousness of the 1994 slayings and on a jury's 11-1 vote in favor of the death penalty in the latest trial, which ended last month. "We feel it's the right thing to do," Brent said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1985
Now that you have devoted reams of paper telling us what a "good" mayor Roger Hedgecock was, perhaps you will devote a smaller space to a different point of view. Most frequently you ascribe three great achievements to the mayor: the convention center, the East Line extension of the trolley and openness at City Hall. Hedgecock told us that the convention center would cost $93 million and the adjacent twin hotels would generate "nothing but money." The center now costs $120 million, is a year behind schedule, and the first hotel is losing $400,000 a month!
NATIONAL
May 17, 2013 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
LAS VEGAS - Over a day of often-vitriolic cross examination, O.J. Simpson's former defense attorney faced a barrage of pointed challenges that his representation was so shoddy and even duplicitous that the fallen football star deserves a new trial in a 2008 robbery and kidnapping conviction. Among the accusations hurled at Miami-based lawyer Yale Galanter: That he refused to hire experts to testify for Simpson in order to boost his own profits in the case and that he failed to adequately advise Simpson about a possible plea agreement offered by prosecutors.
NATIONAL
May 15, 2013 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
LAS VEGAS - On this day, there was no Johnnie Cochran. There was no brash fist-pumping former Heisman Trophy winner in a tailored suit hugging his lead defense attorney after beating murder charges in a California courtroom. After a nearly five-year absence, in which he was locked away in a northern Nevada prison cell, O.J. Simpson returned to the public spotlight Wednesday. The 65-year-old fallen football star, once known for his manic bursts of speed on the field, has been in scores of end zones, TV commercials, movie trailers and two well-publicized Los Angeles court trials.
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