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Retribution

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1991
Re "Oil Town Choking" (April 9): I'm impelled to say that if there ever is a "just war," certainly then there must be a "just retribution." With Saddam Hussein's warlords looking on, he should be led to those devastating, burning caldrons of Kuwait. Give him 13 seconds to ponder a senseless, unnecessary order of war. Then mercifully toss him to one of those burning caldrons. Even this would hardly measure up to a "just retribution." NORMAN FREESTONE Laguna Hills
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NATIONAL
January 13, 2014 | By Joseph Tanfani and Alana Semuels
TRENTON, N.J. - For Gov. Chris Christie, the questions about the traffic jam on the George Washington Bridge are just beginning, as New Jersey Democrats announced a new investigative committee that would push to figure out who ordered the four-day traffic snarl, and why. Democratic leaders in the state Assembly said the committee would begin with the bridge closure and possibly expand to look into other allegations of political retribution by...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1999
In her June 25 column ("Turning Justice Upside Down for Kathleen Soliah"), Patt Morrison ridicules the fact that Soliah, a former Symbionese Liberation Army member and fugitive, is scheduled to be extradited to face criminal charges relating to violent actions in which she allegedly participated 24 years ago. Morrison remarks, "Maybe American justice was dramatically altered while I was out in the kitchen getting a snack, but if I'm not mistaken the...
NATIONAL
December 12, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Republican resentment over the Democrats' decision to change Senate rules and eliminate filibusters on nominations has led to a form of trench warfare in the already deliberative body, producing long hours and hard feelings as the Senate finishes the first week of life with its new rules in place. Democrats, after an all-night session that continued uninterrupted Thursday, said the marathon schedule was a small price to pay. Two new judges are now set to join the influential U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, giving Democratic appointees a majority on the court.
HEALTH
May 8, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Do we feel better now that U.S. forces have captured and killed Osama bin Laden? The pictures and video of spontaneous celebrations across the nation, of baseball fans chanting "U.S.A., U.S.A.," of bagpipes and fist pumps at the former World Trade Center site: All declare the answer an unqualified yes. But researchers who probe the vengeful mind suggest that for some, Bin Laden's demise will reopen psychic wounds, lay bare persistent mental health...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1990
In New York, Kahane assassinated--terrorism. In Israel, two innocent Arabs murdered for retribution--terrorism (Part A, Nov. 7). Shame on both your houses. PATRICK J. LAVELLE, Ojai
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1993
So all across Los Angeles taggers are being killed or seriously injured as a result of their illegal activities. Who cares? These juvenile delinquents are coddled by both their parents and the courts without ever having to make retribution for their illegal acts. If they start eliminating each other through violent acts, maybe they'll eventually become extinct. KYLE ERICSON Bellflower
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1987
You claim the death penalty is not a deterrent. Of course not! No punishment is effective unless it is swift, sure and consistent. A far cry, you admit, from the current state of the death penalty. Until life imprisonment becomes a reality in California, the death penalty is the only assurance that convicted murderers won't kill again and again. Any government that allows such people to go free is not moral. When we demand no retribution for unspeakable wrongs, we cheapen all human life and mock the values we pretend to uphold.
SPORTS
August 4, 2011 | Baxter Holmes, Kevin Baxter and Jim Peltz
Buried deep within the soul of every sport is a select group of traditions that are followed religiously. Whenever a competitor feels he's been wronged, these eye-for-an-eye creeds demand retribution. So, of course, after Milwaukee Brewers pitcher Takashi Saito hit St. Louis Cardinals star Albert Pujols on the left hand Tuesday, St. Louis was going to hit back. And Cardinals reliever Jason Matte did, the next inning, hitting Milwaukee All-Star Ryan Braun in the back. He was just following the game's long-standing retaliatory rule: Throw at somebody.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
It was a bright Saturday afternoon in February, the sun suspended over a glassy sea, when Coast Guard searchers spotted two tiny points of white bobbing in the water off the coast of San Diego. The cutter moved in closer, and the two spots became the toes of Karen Waltz Roston's tennis shoes, floating in the still Pacific above her bruised and bloodied face--the first concrete indication that Roston's honeymoon cruise to Mexico might not have ended as her new husband had said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
One of the former Bell city leaders accused of plundering the town's treasury by taking oversized salaries testified Thursday that the fat paychecks and other extraordinary benefits that came with the job were all but forced on him. George Cole, a former steelworker, returned to the witness stand for a second day and testified that he voted for a 12% annual pay raise for a City Council board in 2008 only because he feared retribution from then-City...
WORLD
October 5, 2012 | By Chris Kraul and Mery Mogollon, Los Angeles Times
CARACAS, Venezuela - In choosing between incumbent Hugo Chavez and challenger Henrique Capriles in Sunday's presidential election, Venezuelans will weigh differing policies, sharply contrasting personal styles and a consideration that observers say may tip the balance among voters: the fear factor. For Capriles to win, many voters who lean in his direction will have to overcome fear that they will lose their jobs or benefits in the event of a government change, that there will be an increase in political violence if Chavez loses, or that the government somehow will find out they voted for Capriles and take retribution.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman
A 3-D version of “Finding Nemo” was expected to dominate the box office upon its debut, but the animated film sank to the runner-up position at the multiplex this weekend. Instead, “Resident Evil: Retribution,” the fifth installment in the popular Milla Jovovich science-fiction thriller franchise, claimed the No. 1 position. However, both films missed industry projections. Pre-release audience polling had suggested that “Retribution” would take in around $27 million during its first weekend in theaters, but Sony Pictures estimated that the film actually opened with a decent $21.1 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2012 | By Robert Abele
While "The Master" grabs this week's prestige-movie hype, that other Paul Anderson - middle initials: W.S.; occupying aesthetic: hyperviolent sci-fi - had a film released too. It's the fifth in the "Resident Evil" franchise of loud, metallic commercials for firing/jumping/throwing prowess and zombie slaughter, aimed at that segment of moviegoers ostensibly on a break from doing the same via their game consoles. The other sequel titles - "Apocalypse," "Extinction," "Afterlife" - tantalizingly implied nowhere more to go. But here we are with "Retribution," which finds poster gal for disaster survival Alice (Milla Jovovich)
OPINION
May 11, 2012 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
I'm a lifelong Democrat and a career educator. So I'm predictably appalled by Wisconsin's Republican Gov. Scott Walker, who has cut spending for schools and stripped teachers - and most of the state's public workers - of collective bargaining rights. But I'm also appalled by the recall campaign against Walker by Wisconsin Democrats, who Tuesday chose Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett to run against Walker in a June 5 special election - a rematch of the 2010 contest. The recall epitomizes the petty, loser-take-all vindictiveness of contemporary American politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2011 | By Robert Abele
Three women lose quite a bit of money (and pride) to a dashing chameleon con artist in the Bollywood confection "Ladies vs. Ricky Bahl," a colorfully busy splash of romantic comedy nonsense that won't fool any seasoned moviegoer with its bad-boy-taming schematics. The title is something of a head-scratcher, because we don't learn hunky star Ranveer Singh's character's real name until the last moments, after he's played a variety of swindling smooth talkers under various names, opposite a wealthy party girl (Parineeti Chopra)
BUSINESS
September 6, 2002 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city's neon lights vibrated in the polished hood of the black BMW as it cruised up Las Vegas Boulevard. The man in the passenger seat was instantly recognizable. Fans lined the streets, waving, snapping photos, begging Tupac Shakur for his autograph. Cops were everywhere, smiling. The BMW 750 sedan, with rap magnate Marion "Suge" Knight at the wheel, was leading a procession of luxury vehicles past the MGM Grand Hotel and Caesars Palace, on their way to a hot new nightclub.
SPORTS
August 4, 2011 | Baxter Holmes, Kevin Baxter and Jim Peltz
Buried deep within the soul of every sport is a select group of traditions that are followed religiously. Whenever a competitor feels he's been wronged, these eye-for-an-eye creeds demand retribution. So, of course, after Milwaukee Brewers pitcher Takashi Saito hit St. Louis Cardinals star Albert Pujols on the left hand Tuesday, St. Louis was going to hit back. And Cardinals reliever Jason Matte did, the next inning, hitting Milwaukee All-Star Ryan Braun in the back. He was just following the game's long-standing retaliatory rule: Throw at somebody.
HEALTH
May 8, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Do we feel better now that U.S. forces have captured and killed Osama bin Laden? The pictures and video of spontaneous celebrations across the nation, of baseball fans chanting "U.S.A., U.S.A.," of bagpipes and fist pumps at the former World Trade Center site: All declare the answer an unqualified yes. But researchers who probe the vengeful mind suggest that for some, Bin Laden's demise will reopen psychic wounds, lay bare persistent mental health...
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