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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2010
The Films of Jean Renoir Where: Leo S. Bing Theater, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. When: Fridays and Saturdays through April 10 Price: $10 general; $7 for museum members, students with valid I.D. and seniors (62 and older) Contact: (323) 857-6010 March schedule Friday: "Toni," 7:30 p.m.; "Swamp Water," 9:30 Saturday: "French Cancan," 7:30 p.m.; "The Golden Coach," 9:25 March 19: "La Bête Humaine," 7:30 p.m.; "The Woman on the Beach," 9:20 March 20: "The Southerner," 7:30 p.m.; "The River," 9:30 March 26: "Grand Illusion," 7:30 p.m.; "The Elusive Corporal," 9:30 March 27: "La Chienne," 7:30 p.m.; "La Marseillaise," 9:15 For entire schedule, go to www.lacma.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Steve Appleford
During four decades, Annie Leibovitz has been a dominant force in portrait photography, first at Rolling Stone and then with increasing skill and vision at Vanity Fair and Vogue. At 64, Leibovitz works hard at it still and isn't ready for a broad career retrospective but takes a look back at some of her most lasting images in "Annie Leibovitz," a huge limited-edition book from Taschen. In the tradition of Helmut Newton's "SUMO," the new volume is about 20-by-27 inches and 476 pages deep.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2012
With nearly 300 photographs edited and sequenced by the artist himself, this retrospective on the career of Robert Adams, "Robert Adams: The Place We Live" seeks to document his fascination with the changing landscape of his native Colorado, as well as the rest of the West. Starting in the mid-'60s and carrying through to this most recent decade, this show will focus on Adams' photography of the Los Angeles terrain. Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 5905 Wilshire Blvd. Open Sunday through June 3. lacma.org.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Even after nine decades as an actor, Norman Lloyd loves to perform - even if it's for an audience of one. During a recent interview, Lloyd was brandishing the cleaver used in "Man From the South," the landmark 1960 episode of "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" starring Steve McQueen and Peter Lorre that Lloyd directed. The ironically macabre tale revolves around a young gambler who makes a gruesome bet with an elderly man to win the man's convertible. If the gambler's lighter lights 10 times straight he will win the car, but if it doesn't the man will cut the gambler's pinkie finger off with a cleaver.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2010 | By Susan King
France's beloved filmmaker Jacques Tati is being feted this weekend at the American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre. The tall, lanky actor-writer-director created a series of slapstick delights that relied more on sight gags than dialogue. His cinematic alter ego, the endearingly bumbling Mr. Hulot, is one of the greatest comedy creations. The fun starts Thursday with a 70-millimeter print of his 1967 " Playtime," in which Hulot is in Paris trying to contact a U.S. official. On tap for Friday is 1958's charming "Mon Oncle," which won the Oscar for best foreign-language film and marked his first film in color.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
The language of excavation is familiar to fans of late Bay Area artist Jay DeFeo. She famously spent eight years from 1958 to '66 both building up and digging into the surface of a massive abstract painting-sculpture ultimately known as "The Rose. " But now that DeFeo is the subject of a major museum retrospective, the excavation image seems better suited to the activity of the curators, such as Dana Miller from the Whitney and Corey Keller at SFMOMA, who have gone well beyond DeFeo's "Rose" to bring her little-known work to light in their exhibitions and this catalog.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
With objects as diverse and mundane as kitchen sponges, steel downspouts, T-shirts and garden hoses, Lynn Aldrich has been crafting whimsical sculptures and installations for more than 20 years. Her current exhibition at Art Center College of Design is a delightfully quixotic retrospective in keeping with the eclectic spirit of her work. Visitors are greeted by a rain of steel downspouts, hanging vertically over the entrance to the galleries. Varying in length, their insides are painted in various shades of blue.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2013 | By David Ng
Next year's highly anticipated retrospective of artist Jeff Koons won't be debuting in Los Angeles as previously expected, according to a recent report. Bloomberg has reported that the show, which will be Koons' first major retrospective in years, will instead premiere in New York at the Whitney Museum of American Art before traveling to Paris at the Centre Pompidou. GRAPHIC: MOCA's ups and downs with Jeffrey Deitch Koons had been expected to unveil the exhibition in January at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art. But a Whitney spokesman told Bloomberg in a report published Friday that MOCA has bowed out of the show and that it will premiere in New York in June.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By Susan King
Pier Paolo Pasolini was one of Italian cinema's most influential, controversial and iconoclastic filmmakers, arriving on the scene after neo-realists such as Vittorio De Sica and Roberto Rossellini. The openly gay playwright, novelist, political theorist, journalist, teacher and poet made films in order to "represent reality with reality. " UCLA Film & Television Archive's new retrospective, "Pure and Impure: The Films of Pier Paolo Pasolini," which opens Friday at the Billy Wilder Theater, features new prints from Istituto Luce Cinecitta in Rome.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
David Bowie, the art museum exhibition, is due to open March 23 for a four-month run at London's venerable Victoria and Albert Museum. For art-world purists who decry the trend toward celebrity-driven programming -- something not unheard of at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, among others -- it's one more sign that they'll just have to “turn and face the strange changes,” to quote a Bowie refrain from...
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
Opening Ceremony has partnered with the Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts to put some of the late artist's work on a capsule collection of T-shirts and tote bags, the retailer announced Tuesday. The retail rollout coincides with the Mike Kelley retrospective that opened at the Geffen Contemporary at the Museum of Contemporary Art on March 31 (and runs through July 28) and includes six images taken from Kelley's drawings and photographs printed on short-sleeve and long-sleeve T-shirts (available now)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Susan King
Robert Altman's films were audacious. He expanded the boundaries of genres. He gave his actors freedom to improvise and over the years created a stock company of stars. Along the way, he often polarized critics and audiences - and drove studio heads crazy. Not every film he did was a masterpiece, and he had lulls in his career. But Altman was nothing if not resilient, and just when Hollywood had written him off, he would make a dazzling comeback. His experimental style, known for overlapping dialogue and loosely structured stories, has influenced contemporary directors such as Paul Thomas Anderson, who was the standby director on the then-ailing Altman's final film, 2006's "A Prairie Home Companion.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Last fall, when the big traveling retrospective of Los Angeles artist Mike Kelley (1954-2012) opened at MoMA PS1, the Museum of Modern Art's outpost in Long Island City, N.Y., the show looked smashing. Largely that was due to the intrinsic quality of Kelley's diverse work in a staggeringly wide range of media - sculpture, painting, drawing, installation, video, performance, mosaic - plus various mash-ups of just about all of them. Partly, though, it was serendipity. PHOTOS: 'Mike Kelley' exhibit A primary subject of Kelley's art is the way familiar social institutions of daily life - especially school and church, but also including art museums and other representatives of authoritative points of view - inevitably conspire to constrain, pressure and sometimes even warp the very adherents they seek to console and liberate.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
I imagine that I know what it's like to be abducted by aliens. Or to leap out of a speeding jet while tripping on acid. With only two weeks left before the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's James Turrell retrospective closes, I squeaked into the artist's much talked about Perceptual Cell, “Light Reignfall,” last weekend.  The retrospective is open to anyone who makes a reservation, but the Perceptual Cell is a separate $45 ticket for...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
By 1991, Mike Kelley had emerged as a crucial artist in Los Angeles, at the head of a pack that had pushed into prominence in the previous decade. His riveting sculptures reassembled from ratty stuffed animals, crocheted dolls and other tattered children's playthings that he scavenged from thrift shops were also generating considerable critical attention far beyond the city. Then 36, Kelley was invited to participate in the Carnegie International exhibition in Pittsburgh, one of the oldest and most respected surveys of its kind.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
Artist Robert Heinecken (1931-2006) is best-known for cleverly manipulating found photographs plucked from mass media, which meant to undermine their authority in America's exploding image-culture. He's not included among the 36 artists in the historical group exhibition "Take It or Leave It" currently at the UCLA Hammer Museum, but he probably should be. A self-styled "para-photographer," Heinecken made pictures that crossed appropriation art with institutional critique, the Hammer show's theme.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Last fall, when the big traveling retrospective of Los Angeles artist Mike Kelley (1954-2012) opened at MoMA PS1, the Museum of Modern Art's outpost in Long Island City, N.Y., the show looked smashing. Largely that was due to the intrinsic quality of Kelley's diverse work in a staggeringly wide range of media - sculpture, painting, drawing, installation, video, performance, mosaic - plus various mash-ups of just about all of them. Partly, though, it was serendipity. PHOTOS: 'Mike Kelley' exhibit A primary subject of Kelley's art is the way familiar social institutions of daily life - especially school and church, but also including art museums and other representatives of authoritative points of view - inevitably conspire to constrain, pressure and sometimes even warp the very adherents they seek to console and liberate.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
SANTA BARBARA - Michelle Stuart and Alice Aycock are very different artists. Stuart is a kind of cartographer, mapping not just the land but our intimate experience of it. Aycock is more literary, transforming familiar themes like the intrusion of technology into nature and society's spiritual discontents into sculptures that are sometimes participatory. However, the juxtaposition of two sizable, retrospective exhibitions of their drawings at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art is fortuitous.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2014 | By Leah Ollman
NEW YORK - What is a photograph? From photography's very beginning, there has always been more than one answer to that question. On the medium's official launch in 1839, a photograph was both a precise, one-of-a-kind image permanently fixed on a mirror-like metal plate (the Daguerreotype) and a replicable print on paper, made from a paper negative (the calotype, or photogenic drawing). Ever since, what photographs look and feel like has continued to evolve with changing technology and aesthetic intent.
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