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Retroviruses

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1989 | JUDY BERLFEIN, Berlfein is a free-lance science writer based in Encinitas. and
It was only a decade ago. The medical community was feeling quite secure. It had stamped out smallpox, put a hold on polio, held tuberculosis at bay. Vaccines and antibiotics had saved us from bacterial and viral infections; wide-scale epidemics were now a topic for history books. But the picture changed drastically in 1981 when doctors first diagnosed a patient as having AIDS. A new disease had appeared on the horizon, an illness caused by a contagious agent now known as a retrovirus.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
March 3, 2013 | By Eryn Brown and Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
For the first time, doctors are reporting that a child born with HIV and put on an unusually aggressive treatment regimen has been functionally cured of the infection. Now 2 years old, the Mississippi girl has only trace amounts of HIV in her bloodstream and has been able to keep the virus that causes AIDS in check without the help of medication, doctors said Sunday at a medical conference in Atlanta. If researchers demonstrate that the same treatment can work in other children, it could drastically alter the lives of the estimated 1,000 babies born with HIV every day, most of them in Africa, doctors said.
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NATIONAL
March 31, 2012 | By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun
African American women in six U.S. cities are becoming infected with HIV at a rate five times the national average for black women, and closer to the rates of some African countries, according to a new study. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University and around the country who made the findings suspected the rates were relatively high in these "hot spots" that have battled the epidemic for decades, but the numbers still came as a surprise in a field that tends to focus more on black and gay men. The researchers found that in Baltimore; Atlanta; Newark, N.J.; New York City; Raleigh-Durham, N.C.; and Washington, the annual rate of infection was 24 per 10,000 black women.
NATIONAL
March 31, 2012 | By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun
African American women in six U.S. cities are becoming infected with HIV at a rate five times the national average for black women, and closer to the rates of some African countries, according to a new study. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University and around the country who made the findings suspected the rates were relatively high in these "hot spots" that have battled the epidemic for decades, but the numbers still came as a surprise in a field that tends to focus more on black and gay men. The researchers found that in Baltimore; Atlanta; Newark, N.J.; New York City; Raleigh-Durham, N.C.; and Washington, the annual rate of infection was 24 per 10,000 black women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
Chronic fatigue syndrome appears to be linked to a virus, but researchers say more study is needed before the cause of the mysterious debilitating illness is known. Scientists found evidence that a type of virus known as a retrovirus was found in the blood of 23 of 30 victims of the syndrome.
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
There is no cure for AIDS, no good treatment to control its symptoms for long periods and no vaccine to prevent it, for one major reason: HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus that causes the disease, is a sloppy housekeeper when it comes to tending its genetic endowment. Every time HIV replicates, it makes mistakes, at least one error per generation of the virus. Within a few generations, it can begin to take on subtly different characteristics.
SCIENCE
March 3, 2013 | By Eryn Brown and Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
For the first time, doctors are reporting that a child born with HIV and put on an unusually aggressive treatment regimen has been functionally cured of the infection. Now 2 years old, the Mississippi girl has only trace amounts of HIV in her bloodstream and has been able to keep the virus that causes AIDS in check without the help of medication, doctors said Sunday at a medical conference in Atlanta. If researchers demonstrate that the same treatment can work in other children, it could drastically alter the lives of the estimated 1,000 babies born with HIV every day, most of them in Africa, doctors said.
NEWS
November 23, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A new virus that appears to have similarities to the AIDS virus has been isolated from a patient with Sjogren's syndrome, an uncommon ailment that causes dryness of the mouth and eyes, according to researchers at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans.
NEWS
October 25, 2010
A new study casts further doubt on the role of a retrovirus, XMRV, in human disease, adding weight to the possibility that earlier studies finding a link between the virus and cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome may have been wrong. In the study, researchers from the National Cancer Institute and Johns Hopkins Medicine report being unable to find any evidence of the retrovirus in nearly 800 prostate cancer samples. "It is possible that XMRV is not actually circulating in the human population," the team wrote in its paper published by the journal Cancer Research last week.
NEWS
June 12, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Government scientists have developed an unusual new form of gene therapy to treat inoperable brain tumors and plan to begin human trials this summer. The new approach, which has cured brain tumors in rats, takes advantage of the fact that brain cells do not normally divide and multiply, while tumor cells multiply rapidly. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute injected the tumors with mouse cells containing a specially modified virus that infects only dividing cells.
NEWS
October 25, 2010
A new study casts further doubt on the role of a retrovirus, XMRV, in human disease, adding weight to the possibility that earlier studies finding a link between the virus and cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome may have been wrong. In the study, researchers from the National Cancer Institute and Johns Hopkins Medicine report being unable to find any evidence of the retrovirus in nearly 800 prostate cancer samples. "It is possible that XMRV is not actually circulating in the human population," the team wrote in its paper published by the journal Cancer Research last week.
SCIENCE
October 9, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
In what may prove to be the first major breakthrough in the fight against the mysterious and controversial disorder known as chronic fatigue syndrome, researchers reported today that they have found traces of a virus in the vast majority of patients with the disease, commonly known as CFS. The same virus has previously been identified in at least a quarter of prostate tumors, particularly those that are very aggressive, and has also been linked...
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
There is no cure for AIDS, no good treatment to control its symptoms for long periods and no vaccine to prevent it, for one major reason: HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus that causes the disease, is a sloppy housekeeper when it comes to tending its genetic endowment. Every time HIV replicates, it makes mistakes, at least one error per generation of the virus. Within a few generations, it can begin to take on subtly different characteristics.
NEWS
June 12, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Government scientists have developed an unusual new form of gene therapy to treat inoperable brain tumors and plan to begin human trials this summer. The new approach, which has cured brain tumors in rats, takes advantage of the fact that brain cells do not normally divide and multiply, while tumor cells multiply rapidly. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute injected the tumors with mouse cells containing a specially modified virus that infects only dividing cells.
BOOKS
March 31, 1991 | Daniel Harris, Harris is a columnist for the Quarterly. His work has appeared in Harper's, the Washington Post and the Nation
While painstakingly factual, Dominique Lapierre's new history of the AIDS epidemic is actually fictional in its approach--a gripping adventure story that succeeds by virtue of its skillful manipulation of plot, suspense and character. Far from being a straightforward chronology of red-letter dates in the spread of the disease, it is an eminently readable pastiche of literary genres: of the detective story, in its engaging portrayal of scientific sleuths stalking the biological culprit, hot on the trail of new clues; of the spy story, in its riveting account of international espionage, with medical pioneers such as Robert Gallo and his French counterpart, Luc Montagnier, swept up in a James Bond thriller as they snipe at each other across the Atlantic, each claiming to have discovered the virus; of the Harlequin romance, in its purplish descriptions of love blossoming in laboratories, of eyes locking over Bunsen burners and Petri dishes; and even of hagiography, in its moving profiles of Mother Teresa and the armies of courageous health-care providers who have withstood the harrowing challenges of AIDS.
NEWS
November 23, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A new virus that appears to have similarities to the AIDS virus has been isolated from a patient with Sjogren's syndrome, an uncommon ailment that causes dryness of the mouth and eyes, according to researchers at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans.
BOOKS
March 31, 1991 | Daniel Harris, Harris is a columnist for the Quarterly. His work has appeared in Harper's, the Washington Post and the Nation
While painstakingly factual, Dominique Lapierre's new history of the AIDS epidemic is actually fictional in its approach--a gripping adventure story that succeeds by virtue of its skillful manipulation of plot, suspense and character. Far from being a straightforward chronology of red-letter dates in the spread of the disease, it is an eminently readable pastiche of literary genres: of the detective story, in its engaging portrayal of scientific sleuths stalking the biological culprit, hot on the trail of new clues; of the spy story, in its riveting account of international espionage, with medical pioneers such as Robert Gallo and his French counterpart, Luc Montagnier, swept up in a James Bond thriller as they snipe at each other across the Atlantic, each claiming to have discovered the virus; of the Harlequin romance, in its purplish descriptions of love blossoming in laboratories, of eyes locking over Bunsen burners and Petri dishes; and even of hagiography, in its moving profiles of Mother Teresa and the armies of courageous health-care providers who have withstood the harrowing challenges of AIDS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
Chronic fatigue syndrome appears to be linked to a virus, but researchers say more study is needed before the cause of the mysterious debilitating illness is known. Scientists found evidence that a type of virus known as a retrovirus was found in the blood of 23 of 30 victims of the syndrome.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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