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Reuben Anderson

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NEWS
January 17, 1985 | United Press International
Reuben V. Anderson, who in the past had to show his law degree to be allowed inside Mississippi's segregated courthouses, was sworn in Wednesday as the first black on the state's Supreme Court. More than 100 persons looked on as Chief Justice Neville Patterson administered the oath to Anderson. Anderson has served as a county judge and since 1981 as a Circuit Court judge.
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NEWS
January 13, 1985 | Associated Press
Circuit Judge Reuben V. Anderson has been appointed to the Mississippi Supreme Court, becoming the first black to join the court. Anderson, 42, was chosen Friday by Gov. Bill Allain to replace Justice Francis S. Bowling of Jackson, who announced his retirement last month. Anderson, who began practicing law in 1967, said his selection demonstrated how far Mississippi has come in the last two decades. "When I first started practicing law, I had to take my diploma with me wherever I went.
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | From Associated Press
Four of eight black candidates have won judgeships in elections ordered by a federal judge who had ruled that Mississippi's judicial districts discriminated against blacks. Two of the winners were opposed. Mississippi will now have five blacks among its 78 judges, a gain of one after Tuesday's elections. One incumbent was defeated. The state's four black judges are Supreme Court Justice Reuben Anderson, Circuit Judges Fred L. Banks Jr. and Lillie Blackmon-Sanders and Chancery Judge Isaac Byrd.
NEWS
January 11, 1985 | Associated Press
Circuit Court Judge Reuben V. Anderson was picked today to fill a vacancy on the Mississippi Supreme Court and will become the first black ever to sit on the court. Anderson, 42, will replace Justice Francis S. Bowling, who announced his retirement last month. "I look forward to the challenge," Anderson said of the appointment by Gov. Bill Allain. "I never thought about it (being a Supreme Court justice) back when I was practicing law. I never envisioned it."
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | KATHY EYRE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Those who march to a different drum in Mississippi can find liberal camaraderie in the sounds of old instruments such as sacbuts, lutes, krummhorns, cornettos and viola da gambas. The Mississippi Academy of Ancient Music Inc. is sponsoring recitals reviving old instrumentation and period music, at the same time providing social gatherings for many who may not feel comfortable at Southern black-tie affairs, Academy President Rich McGinnis said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1993 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And on the 18th day, Mayor Richard Riordan sat on the hot seat. Then he tried to show 2,500 volunteers from the city's four largest community organizations that Riordan, the mayor, will keep promises made by Riordan, the candidate. In a sweltering high school gymnasium on Los Angeles' Eastside, he signed papers Sunday that unfettered $2.5 million in city funds for Hope in Youth, a gang intervention program.
NEWS
June 20, 1993 | EMILY ADAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Pastor Reuben Anderson looks at the architect's model of his proposed church complex, he sometimes thinks he is gazing upon a tiny miracle. The plans for the new Tower of Faith Evangelistic Church are ambitious. If completed as planned, the 14-acre, $23-million complex will have a sanctuary larger than Orange County's Crystal Cathedral, a full gymnasium and an Olympic-size swimming pool. The miracle, he said, was getting city approval for the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1994 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Spanish and English, to the hand-clapping rhythm of gospel music as well as the more sedate tempo of a song for Our Lady of Guadalupe, 500 Compton residents joined a "unity rally" Sunday to insist that portrayals of their community as ethnically divided are unwarranted. "We gather together . . . as a declaration of our determined resolve to live together in harmony," said the Rev. Reuben P.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | MICHELE FUETSCH, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. William R. Johnson Jr. is among a group of community activists promising to muster 1,500 people for a rally this afternoon to pressure city officials to sell a site alongside the Artesia Freeway for low-cost homes. Alfonso Benson Sr. is a member of Johnson's Curry Temple congregation and a city planning commissioner. Benson says he will fight "tooth and nail" against selling the site for housing.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | MICHELE FUETSCH, Times Staff Writer
The City Council Tuesday told its Redevelopment Agency staff to begin soliciting commercial development proposals for the Compton Auto Plaza, rebuffing the pleas of a clergy-led community group that wants to build low-cost, owner-occupied townhouses on a portion of the 55-acre site.
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