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Reuben Awards

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NEWS
May 16, 1994
The National Cartoonist Society presented its 48th annual Reuben Awards in LaJolla Saturday night. Veteran comic-strip creators Charles Schulz ("Peanuts") and Mort Walker ("Beetle Bailey") presented Jim Borgman of the Cincinnati Enquirer with the group's top honor, outstanding cartoonist of the year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1998 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Dilbert might put it, the performance-management task force offered input to the peer review study group, which sent its recommendation to the strategic planning committee, which compiled the final report. There was simply no way that cartoonists picking the year's top comic strip could merely toss names in a hat--and then draw the winner.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1998 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Dilbert might put it, the performance-management task force offered input to the peer review study group, which sent its recommendation to the strategic planning committee, which compiled the final report. There was simply no way that cartoonists picking the year's top comic strip could merely toss names in a hat--and then draw the winner.
NEWS
May 16, 1994
The National Cartoonist Society presented its 48th annual Reuben Awards in LaJolla Saturday night. Veteran comic-strip creators Charles Schulz ("Peanuts") and Mort Walker ("Beetle Bailey") presented Jim Borgman of the Cincinnati Enquirer with the group's top honor, outstanding cartoonist of the year.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was no ship of fools but there was enough foolishness aboard to sink a ship. Sailing on the Norwegian Cruise Line's luxury liner from Miami to the Bahamas and back were 125 of the world's funniest people--the creators of a cast of cartoon characters that make millions laugh each day. The characters are some of our closest friends--Cathy, Crock, that crank bus driver Ed Crankshaft, Momma, Beetle Bailey, the Wizard of Id, Wiley, Thor and the Clumsy Carp from B.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2003 | From Associated Press
Matt Groening, creator of America's favorite animated family, "The Simpsons," was named cartoonist of the year at the 2003 Reuben Awards. Darby Conley won best newspaper comic for his strip, "Get Fuzzy," which details the adventures of Rob Wilco, a single ad executive, and his temperamental cat Buckeye and gentle dog Satchel. The 57th annual award ceremony was held Saturday at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2000 | a Times Staff Writer
Almost all the nation's daily comics have a "Peanuts" theme today, with a Charlie Brown here or a "good grief" there. The coordinated effort was conceived by "Mutts" cartoonist Patrick McDonnell before Charles M. Schulz's death Feb. 12, said Daryl Cagle, president of the National Cartoonists Society. It was planned to appear on the same day the society would be meeting to pay Schulz tribute and to give him a lifetime achievement award.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2009 | Yvonne Villarreal
Picture the scene: a room full of cartoonists, sipping cocktails and making small talk. What might each of their text balloons say about the state of cartooning today? Lalo Alcaraz's would be succinct. "We're going to hell in a handbasket," said the creator of the comic strip "La Cucaracha." Alcaraz suspects that will be the consensus this weekend at the National Cartoonists Society's annual convention in Hollywood.
NEWS
November 16, 1995 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the old days, successful comic-strip artists drew till they dropped dead--and sometimes longer, if their strips were bequeathed to others. Then, in 1983, "Doonesbury" creator Garry Trudeau rattled the industry by taking a 20-month sabbatical. "That sabbatical inspired other sabbaticals, and those sabbaticals led to retirements," says Steve Moore, whose "In the Bleachers" panel appears in about 200 papers, including The Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1986 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, Times Staff Writer
For the second consecutive year, the nation's comic-strip artists are teaming up with the USA for Africa Foundation on Thanksgiving Day to attempt to raise both money and consciousness over the issue of hunger. Informally calling itself "Comic Relief," the loose coalition of several dozen cartoonists range from "Doonesbury's" Garry Trudeau to "Hagar the Horrible's" Dik Browne. As they did last year, participating cartoonists will devote their strips to anti-hunger themes.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was no ship of fools but there was enough foolishness aboard to sink a ship. Sailing on the Norwegian Cruise Line's luxury liner from Miami to the Bahamas and back were 125 of the world's funniest people--the creators of a cast of cartoon characters that make millions laugh each day. The characters are some of our closest friends--Cathy, Crock, that crank bus driver Ed Crankshaft, Momma, Beetle Bailey, the Wizard of Id, Wiley, Thor and the Clumsy Carp from B.C.
NEWS
May 30, 1995 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A cartoonists' convention isn't all laughs. In fact, at one point last weekend, a gathering of some of the world's funniest, most insightful people turned downright melancholic as famed comic-strip creators reminisced during a panel discussion about how they got started in the business. Pulitzer Prize-winner Mike Peters described his dysfunctional family, his childhood unhappiness. "I also had an awful stutter," said the creator of "Mother Goose and Grimm."
NEWS
December 15, 1999 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seems Charlie Brown will never outwit Snoopy, never get the little redheaded girl and never kick that football. He won't get the chance. Because of a continuing battle with colon cancer, "Peanuts" creator Charles M. Schulz announced Tuesday that he will retire shortly after New Year's. One of the world's most widely read comics will have its last original daily strip appear Jan. 3 and its final Sunday release Feb. 13.
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