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Reunification Democratic Party South Korea

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NEWS
February 27, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Declaring its intent to promote national reconciliation, President Roh Tae Woo's Cabinet approved an amnesty Friday that freed 125 political prisoners today but left 80 others, including the most prominent one, in prison. The amnesty, Roh's first act since assuming office Thursday, freed 2,134 prisoners of all categories, and affected a total of 7,234 people, including criminals and former prisoners whose civil rights will be restored.
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NEWS
May 13, 1988
Kim Young Sam was reelected to the presidency of the Reunification Democratic Party, one of South Korea's main opposition parties. He had stepped down Feb. 8 after losing the Dec. 16 presidential election to the ruling party's Roh Tae Woo. Kim and rival Kim Dae Jung were blamed for splitting the opposition vote, and both resigned as heads of their parties. But the opposition won a majority in the National Assembly last month, and both Kims have resumed leadership of their parties.
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NEWS
March 22, 1988
Negotiations to reunite South Korea's bitterly divided opposition collapsed again, with both sides refusing to compromise over sharing power and party posts. The Reunification Democratic Party announced that it has pulled out of talks and denounced the smaller Party for Peace and Democracy. Both sides agreed that there is no hope of uniting the two parties before National Assembly elections next month.
NEWS
March 13, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Attempts to forge a united opposition before crucial parliamentary elections this spring collapsed last week with the largest opposition party refusing to negotiate with leading dissident Kim Dae Jung. "Without the retirement of Kim Dae Jung, no opposition unity can be obtained. Unification of the opposition without the retirement of Kim is meaningless," Kim Myung Yun, acting president of the Reunification Democratic Party, said Friday.
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Liberal opposition forces moved toward a split Tuesday as Kim Young Sam urged his rival, Kim Dae Jung, not to run for president in order to forestall a possible military coup. The advice was rejected. With only one day left in September, the two opposition leaders so far have failed to fulfill their Sept. 21 promise to decide by the end of the month which of them would be the candidate. No further meeting was scheduled.
NEWS
August 4, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
The ruling and opposition parties finally began negotiations Monday on the constitutional amendments promised by President Chun Doo Hwan on July 1 to transform South Korea into a fully democratic country. Four delegates each from the ruling party and the major opposition party, the Reunification Democratic Party, agreed that an amended constitution should require the nation's 600,000-member armed forces to remain politically neutral.
NEWS
March 13, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Attempts to forge a united opposition before crucial parliamentary elections this spring collapsed last week with the largest opposition party refusing to negotiate with leading dissident Kim Dae Jung. "Without the retirement of Kim Dae Jung, no opposition unity can be obtained. Unification of the opposition without the retirement of Kim is meaningless," Kim Myung Yun, acting president of the Reunification Democratic Party, said Friday.
NEWS
October 28, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Voting for a direct voice in government, South Koreans on Tuesday overwhelmingly approved constitutional amendments that authorize this country's first fair and open presidential election in 16 years, planned for December. Turnout was mixed, lower in the big cities where the political opposition is strong, but the revisions carried strongly--93% in favor--in the nationwide referendum. A simple majority was required for passage.
NEWS
July 25, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The ruling Democratic Justice Party agreed Friday to begin negotiations with the opposition next week on constitutional revisions aimed at direct presidential elections later this year. But it turned aside opposition demands to discuss other volatile issues, including political prisoners, in the same forum. The eight-member negotiating panel will include four high-level officials from the ruling party and four from the main opposition Reunification Democratic Party.
NEWS
November 18, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Roh Tae Woo, the ruling party's presidential candidate, was accused by an opposition party Tuesday of complicity in intimidating the president of South Korea in 1979 when Roh was a major general, of disobeying orders of the defense minister and of torturing the army chief of staff. The accusations were issued in a 12-point "open inquiry" by the opposition Reunification Democratic Party headed by Kim Young Sam, one of Roh's rivals in the Dec. 16 election for president.
NEWS
February 27, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Declaring its intent to promote national reconciliation, President Roh Tae Woo's Cabinet approved an amnesty Friday that freed 125 political prisoners today but left 80 others, including the most prominent one, in prison. The amnesty, Roh's first act since assuming office Thursday, freed 2,134 prisoners of all categories, and affected a total of 7,234 people, including criminals and former prisoners whose civil rights will be restored.
NEWS
November 18, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Roh Tae Woo, the ruling party's presidential candidate, was accused by an opposition party Tuesday of complicity in intimidating the president of South Korea in 1979 when Roh was a major general, of disobeying orders of the defense minister and of torturing the army chief of staff. The accusations were issued in a 12-point "open inquiry" by the opposition Reunification Democratic Party headed by Kim Young Sam, one of Roh's rivals in the Dec. 16 election for president.
NEWS
November 10, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Kim Young Sam, cementing his opposition candidacy, accepted the presidential nomination of the fractured Reunification Democratic Party on Monday and called again on his rival, Kim Dae Jung, to return to the fold. "I know that fielding a single presidential candidate from our democratic forces is a mandate," Kim told 1,200 cheering supporters packed into an auditorium in downtown Seoul. "On my part, I have made efforts. . . . But I regret that Kim Dae Jung deserted . . . to form his own party."
NEWS
October 28, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Voting for a direct voice in government, South Koreans on Tuesday overwhelmingly approved constitutional amendments that authorize this country's first fair and open presidential election in 16 years, planned for December. Turnout was mixed, lower in the big cities where the political opposition is strong, but the revisions carried strongly--93% in favor--in the nationwide referendum. A simple majority was required for passage.
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Liberal opposition forces moved toward a split Tuesday as Kim Young Sam urged his rival, Kim Dae Jung, not to run for president in order to forestall a possible military coup. The advice was rejected. With only one day left in September, the two opposition leaders so far have failed to fulfill their Sept. 21 promise to decide by the end of the month which of them would be the candidate. No further meeting was scheduled.
NEWS
August 4, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
The ruling and opposition parties finally began negotiations Monday on the constitutional amendments promised by President Chun Doo Hwan on July 1 to transform South Korea into a fully democratic country. Four delegates each from the ruling party and the major opposition party, the Reunification Democratic Party, agreed that an amended constitution should require the nation's 600,000-member armed forces to remain politically neutral.
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