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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Wearing T-shirts bearing the slogan "Stitch or Die," a group of homeless veterans turned on sewing machines on a recent weekday and set to work, deep within a Carson manufacturing plant. They were members of Green Vets Los Angeles, a nonprofit program designed to help them earn a living and overcome the physical injuries and lingering anxieties of battlefield service by putting together a hot new product in local markets: reusable cloth shopping bags made out of scrap material. The program is the brainchild of Jim Cragg, president and chief executive of Special Operations Technologies Inc., a defense contractor that specializes in military survival gear.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Many more Californians would have to pay for paper or reusable plastic bags at the grocery store under a new agreement by key state lawmakers that would ban other plastic bags. After three unsuccessful attempts to outlaw single-use plastic grocery bags statewide, legislators announced a compromise Thursday that they said appears headed for passage. Their proposal would impose a 10-cent fee on alternative bags while banning single-use plastic bags. "This breaks a decade-long deadlock on a statewide solution," said Mark Murray, executive director of Californians Against Waste.
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OPINION
April 30, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The most sensible solution to the ocean and stream pollution caused by carry-out plastic bags would be to charge a small fee for them. People will do almost anything to avoid even a tiny levy - tote their own reusable bags, toss their loose groceries into the trunk. Unfortunately, none of the three bills in the Legislature to address the plastic bag problem would work that way. Consumers already pay for carry-out bags; they just don't realize it because the cost is rolled into the price of the goods they buy, creating the illusion that the bags are free.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2013 | By Howard Blume
Some Los Angeles grocery store customers will have to adjust to a lifestyle change come Jan. 1, when a ban on plastic bags takes effect. As of Wednesday, the thin, seemingly ubiquitous carryalls will be illegal for all large grocers to distribute. Small markets must follow suit in July. Customers will have to bring their own bags, buy reusable ones or purchase paper bags for 10 cents apiece. When L.A. passed its plastic bag ban in June, it became the nation's largest city to take this step.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2007 | Paloma Esquivel, Times Staff Writer
It's a tale of two communities, told through bags. Pacific Palisades and El Monte -- like communities statewide -- are bedeviled by plastic shopping bags that litter streets and waterways. Each year, activists say, more than 6 billion plastic shopping bags are used in Los Angeles County alone.
OPINION
September 1, 2010 | By Keith Christman
Over the weekend, Assemblywoman Julia Brownley (D-Santa Monica) and other supporters of the bill to ban plastic grocery bags (AB 1998) attempted to make the legislation more palatable to state senators, who will decide the bill's fate soon. The amendments they made to win over reluctant senators actually prove that Brownley's bill would hurt working families, put people out of good jobs and create an expensive new bureaucracy when California has far more pressing problems to solve. The amendments added behind closed doors shine a spotlight on the major weaknesses of the legislation.
OPINION
April 5, 2007
Re "A mixed bag," editorial, March 29 I was surprised that the best solution to this problem is being ignored by The Times' editors and the politicians. The solution is for people to use their own reusable bags. Many of our environmental problems can be solved by simply disposing of our "disposable" culture. Some grocery markets in Australia, New Zealand and Ireland either charge customers for using disposable bags or do not provide them at all. Using reusable bags, everyone wins (except the manufacturers of the disposable bags)
OPINION
December 1, 2013
Re "Hard data on plastic bags," Editorial, Nov. 27 The Times' suggestion of a study to determine the effects of plastic-bag bans on the municipalities in California that have passed them is an excellent idea. But let's make sure it is truly objective. The study should consider the overall life-cycle impacts of plastic versus reusable bags, including their impact on the environment, jobs and society in general. For example, will cases of salmonella and other food-borne diseases increase because of the greater use of reusable fabric bags?
OPINION
August 24, 2012
Re "Ban on plastic bags OKd," Aug. 21 While it is great that West Hollywood understands the need to eliminate the tons of waste we generate each year, I don't see how eliminating plastic shopping bags helps. My grocery stores recycle old plastic bags to make their bags. I use my reusable bags most of the time but also collect enough of these already recycled bags to use at home for garbage and pet waste collection. Without these recycled bags, I would have to purchase new bags, use them once and throw them out - an expensive single-use product for me and for the environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2011 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
Come September, that oft-repeated query "Paper or plastic?" will no longer be uttered in supermarket checkout lanes in Santa Monica. With single-use plastic bags about as popular as restaurant ashtrays in this progressive beachfront city, the City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to ban their distribution in stores. FOR THE RECORD: Plastic bags: An article in the Jan. 27 LATExtra section about the Santa Monica City Council's decision to ban single-use plastic bags incorrectly paraphrased comments by Mayor Richard Bloom.
OPINION
December 1, 2013
Re "Hard data on plastic bags," Editorial, Nov. 27 The Times' suggestion of a study to determine the effects of plastic-bag bans on the municipalities in California that have passed them is an excellent idea. But let's make sure it is truly objective. The study should consider the overall life-cycle impacts of plastic versus reusable bags, including their impact on the environment, jobs and society in general. For example, will cases of salmonella and other food-borne diseases increase because of the greater use of reusable fabric bags?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
With a plastic-bag ban set to go into effect in Los Angeles on the first of the new year, city officials are launching a campaign to get residents in the habit of using reusable totes. The city has teamed up with environmental groups and nonprofit organizations that work with veterans and former gang members to produce a line of bags made from recycled or repurposed materials. Los Angeles City Councilman Paul Koretz, who led the push for the ban and who is now raising money to manufacture the totes, said the bags will be given away for free.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Nearly three weeks after a statewide ban on plastic bags was rejected in Sacramento, the Los Angeles City Council is moving ahead with a similar measure to regulate carryout bags at supermarkets, pharmacies and some big retail chains. Council members are scheduled to vote Tuesday on the final draft of its grocery bag ordinance, which would impose fines of up to $500 for those who repeatedly distribute "single-use" plastic bags to customers. The proposed law, in the works for years, would apply to convenience stores, food marts and any large retailer that sells groceries, such as Target and Wal-Mart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Catherine Saillant and Matt Stevens, Los Angeles Times
Attention Los Angeles shoppers: The plastic bag is disappearing from more than just the supermarket. L.A. on Tuesday became the newest and by far the largest city to back a ban on plastic grocery bags, approving an ordinance that applies not just to food stores and mini marts but also big retail chains with their own line of groceries, such as Target and Wal-Mart. The ordinance, which has been in the works for years, would go into effect gradually, reaching large stores Jan. 1 and smaller ones July 1, 2014.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Think Latino Democratic lawmakers from Los Angeles vote the same way on key bills? Think again. Case in point: the recent defeat of a plastic shopping bag ban. The bill, by Sen. Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima), died after fellow Latinos voted it down on the Senate floor. SB 405 would have prohibited supermarkets and superstores from handing out plastic bags after Jan. 1. Convenience stores and smaller outlets had a later deadline. Padilla said that the bags cause litter, foul up sorting machines and harm wildlife.
OPINION
April 30, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The most sensible solution to the ocean and stream pollution caused by carry-out plastic bags would be to charge a small fee for them. People will do almost anything to avoid even a tiny levy - tote their own reusable bags, toss their loose groceries into the trunk. Unfortunately, none of the three bills in the Legislature to address the plastic bag problem would work that way. Consumers already pay for carry-out bags; they just don't realize it because the cost is rolled into the price of the goods they buy, creating the illusion that the bags are free.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Many more Californians would have to pay for paper or reusable plastic bags at the grocery store under a new agreement by key state lawmakers that would ban other plastic bags. After three unsuccessful attempts to outlaw single-use plastic grocery bags statewide, legislators announced a compromise Thursday that they said appears headed for passage. Their proposal would impose a 10-cent fee on alternative bags while banning single-use plastic bags. "This breaks a decade-long deadlock on a statewide solution," said Mark Murray, executive director of Californians Against Waste.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2008 | Tami Abdollah, Times Staff Writer
An ordinance unanimously adopted by Malibu's City Council this week will soon make plastic bags a thing of the past among its 13,000 residents and four supermarkets. The measure will apply to all retailers, including grocery stores, restaurants, pharmacies and city facilities, which will have about six months to comply, or face a fine of up to $1,000. Smaller vendors will have up to a year. The action follows a number of other efforts in California to ban plastic bags.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
Sixty cities including Los Angeles, Santa Monica and Pasadena already have acted to ban single-use plastic bags at store checkout lines, and now a lawmaker says it is time for the rest of the state to follow suit.  State Sen. Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima) has introduced legislation that would prohibit large retail stores throughout California from providing single-use carryout bags to customers starting in 2015. Starting in July 2016, the ban would extend to convenience food stores, food marts and other smaller businesses under SB 405. Stores would be able to sell recycled paper bags, compostable bags or reusable bags to customers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Wearing T-shirts bearing the slogan "Stitch or Die," a group of homeless veterans turned on sewing machines on a recent weekday and set to work, deep within a Carson manufacturing plant. They were members of Green Vets Los Angeles, a nonprofit program designed to help them earn a living and overcome the physical injuries and lingering anxieties of battlefield service by putting together a hot new product in local markets: reusable cloth shopping bags made out of scrap material. The program is the brainchild of Jim Cragg, president and chief executive of Special Operations Technologies Inc., a defense contractor that specializes in military survival gear.
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