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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1999
"Risky Reuse of Medical Equipment Is on Rise" (Aug. 2) sounds to me like the medical community has come up with its own version of assisted suicide! The recycling of medical devices (cardiac catheters, biopsy needles, etc.) that are intended to be used only one time and only on one patient seems not only to be a cost-cutting measure but one that will reduce the patient load. Perhaps the medical community would be interested in some of my old tweezers to reprocess for the removal of splinters?
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OPINION
September 24, 2013
Re "How a family's path veered," Sept. 22 The article points out that Janet Barker, who supports her ex-husband, daughter, son-in-law and grandson, "was better off than her parents, who refolded aluminum foil to use again. " What's wrong with refolding aluminum foil? You made it sound as if it is indicative of poverty. It's not. Reusing aluminum foil - or any number of "disposable" products - is good for the environment as well as the pocketbook. I can easily afford to throw away the clean foil in which I warmed some rolls, or the pump-style lotion bottle with an inch of lotion left, or the heavy plastic bag that kept the bread fresh.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1998
The Dec. 11 article "No Quorum, so Panel Has No Stance on El Toro Flight Test" incorrectly attributes to me statements that are not mine. You incorrectly quote me in reference to Orange County officials as saying, "Yes, I think they'll cheat." While I do have serious objections to the county's handling of El Toro reuse issues, I have never formed those words, nor would I choose that characterization, which is unnecessary and inflammatory. JIM SHAW San Clemente
BUSINESS
June 29, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Each year, Andy Ruben bought his daughter new shinguards for soccer, stashing the old gear and waiting for the replacements to labor through the delivery system to his door. But as he watched local girls outgrow their own sports equipment, Ruben realized that the items he wanted were gathering dust in garages and closets around his neighborhood. "Our whole retail model over the last 50 years has focused on keeping the industrial machine churning out items," said Ruben, who until 2007 had an up-close view as the head of sustainability at Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the king of mass-produced goods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1995
The Nov. 26 editorial, "Spending on El Toro Plans Is Premature," is based on the faulty premise that the sole purpose of the county's reuse planning process is to plan an airport at El Toro and that federal funding for that process would be wasted if Measure S passes in March 1996. Nothing could be further from the truth. The county is the federally designated Local Redevelopment Authority. As such it is the county's duty to expeditiously develop a reuse plan which will provide the greatest economic benefit to the Orange County community.
OPINION
December 14, 2002
Following a realignment at the Long Beach Naval Shipyard in the early '90s, Navy housing on Taper Avenue was declared surplus. The federal government transferred all of this housing to a homeless provider without informing or involving the community in this decision. In 1994, the federal law was amended to ensure greater citizen input into land reuse decisions. The reuse proposal addressed in your Dec. 5 editorial is the result of the grass-roots process required by law. At numerous public hearings, the needs of the region's homeless population were carefully weighed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1993
Every citizen of Orange County has a legitimate say and claim in the outcome of the reuse of the El Toro Marine Corps air base. The reuse decision must involve all of the people of the county. That's what democracy in action is all about. If Haiti, 500-plus miles from America, is in the national interest, and I think it is, why isn't the reuse of El Toro in the interest of Brea, Buena Park, Costa Mesa, Santa Ana, Cypress, Yorba Linda, Orange, Fullerton, Garden Grove, Huntington Beach, La Habra, Seal Beach, Los Alamitos, Placentia, Westminster, Fountain Valley, La Habra, Stanton and Villa Park, between 10 and 20 miles away?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1995
Re "Pentagon Wants End to El Toro Logjam," (Jan. 12): As the article states, because of the continuing deadlock on reuse plans for the El Toro base "the Defense Department could draft a reuse plan of its own." The close decision on the airport referendum resulted in a more aggravated dissension. This must be the time to send the Board of Supervisors (and Irvine and Lake Forest) back to the drawing board to doodle out a reuse plan for all citizens, from San Clemente to La Habra--a New York-style Central Park for Orange County.
MAGAZINE
October 22, 2006
"Adaptive reuse" should become the motto for all of Los Angeles ("Recycle, Reuse, Re-create," Home Design Issue, Oct. 1). Thanks to Barbara Thornburg's wonderful look at the art of artful living, perhaps many more useful and exciting L.A. buildings will be reborn. I've made copies of her article to give to Beverly Hills developers so that instead of tearing down old estates, they can adaptively reuse them as new estates. What a concept. Rodney Kemerer Beverly Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1994
Although the May 8 editorial is entitled "Let the Public Join the El Toro Discussion," it is critical of our attempts to draw the public into El Toro Reuse discussion by circulating a petition which would lead to the designation of El Toro as a commercial airport. We believe that the circulation of these petitions effects the most direct form of participatory control over the most significant land-use decision affecting Orange County. Although The Times apparently believes that petitions are signed by people who don't know what they are signing, we have found the citizenry informed and concerned about the ramifications for the reuse of El Toro.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2013 | David Lazarus
When you lick a problem, you expect it to stay licked. Unfortunately, that's not always the case. In 2005, I wrote about the banking industry's little-known practice of recycling checking account numbers. In other words, banks were reissuing former customers' account numbers to new customers. Trouble was, some of those former bank customers saved their old checks, using them later to pull money from the accounts of people who had received their recycled numbers. California legislators stepped in and passed a law requiring that banks wait at least three years before reissuing account numbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
"America's Funniest Home Videos" drew nearly 33 million viewers when it debuted in 1989. Its amateur footage of adults, children and pets captured in pratfalls made the show ABC's longest-running prime-time entertainment program, and created the concept of "user-generated videos" long before the advent of YouTube. But after 24 years on the air, "AFV's" audience has dwindled to 6.3 million viewers per episode, according to Nielsen. PHOTOS: Hollywood backlot moments So Executive Producer Vin Di Bona and former ABC executive Bruce Gersh have created an independent production company, FishBowl WorldWide Media, to look for new ways to mine "AFV's" massive video library.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - A digital Barbie vanity mirror that allows makeup experimentation without the mess. Customizable figurines mounted on spinning tops that battle in a portable arena. New Play Doh Plus that's fluffier and more malleable. The hippest new toys showcased at the American International Toy Fair this week are interactive, adaptable and, often, more than a bit familiar. "We're reinventing older brands so that kids can rediscover them as if they were new," said John Frascotti, chief marketing officer for Hasbro Inc., at the show in New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2012 | By Randall Roberts
When a flier similar to the bus ad pictured above recently landed in our inbox, a red flag went off: The featured image is famous to many Guns N' Roses fans as the Robert Williams painting printed on the original cover of "Appetite for Destruction. " The image, of a robot appearing to have just committed an act of sexual violence against a woman, prompted Geffen Records to recall the album in 1987 and replace it with a less rape-oriented cover. The image has been resurrected, it turns out, by the Hard Rock Hotel and Resort in Las Vegas in service of the ad campaign promoting its Guns N' Roses residency, and at least one of the Clark County commissioners is none too happy about it. The Las Vegas Sun spoke to Commissioner Mary Beth Scow, who oversaw a recent event temporarily renaming Paradise Road as Paradise City Road.  “I hadn't seen the advertising before the media event,” she told the Sun. “It's clearly inappropriate.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The union representing Hollywood's actors hailed a landmark international treaty that officials said would provide important "economical and moral rights" for actors and other performers around the world. SAG-AFTRA, which has more than 160,000 members, said actors would benefit from a treaty signed by 46 countries Tuesday at a conference in Beijing held by the World Intellectual Property Organization, a United Nations agency in Geneva. If ratified, the treaty would require member countries to set up systems guaranteeing that actors and other performers would be compensated for the reuse of their work.
HOME & GARDEN
January 29, 2011 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
Psst. That coffee cup in your hand. Where will you toss it? Trash bin? Recycling bin? What about the little white bag that has a few grease spots from your Mexican restaurant chips? And what happens to those utensils labeled "biodegradable" you bought for a family picnic? Where should you put plastic grocery bags? The choice of black, blue or green bin is meant to be simple. As the director of the Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation, Enrique Zaldivar, said, if it's not easy, it doesn't work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1995
We want to take this opportunity to express our concerns with regard to the reuse of the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station. We believe that given the impending Measure A litigation, the anti-Measure A initiative, uncertainty regarding the county's consultant selection process, the potential delay on the release of [federal] and state funding, unfolding developments with the county's bankruptcy resulting in [civil accusations] against two seated county supervisors, the diversion of regional planning and roadway funds to the reuse planning of [the base]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1994
Residents of South County can rest much easier this holiday now that the County Board of Supervisors has abolished the El Toro Reuse Planning Authority. The El Toro Marine base isn't going to become a commercial airport any time soon, thanks to the board's imperious behavior, probably never. The board's precipitous decision to deny Irvine and Lake Forest any planning authority over the future reuse of El Toro should raise serious suspicions at the Department of Defense about the inclusiveness and rationality of the county's new reuse planning process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2010 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
When the landmark Long Beach bookstore Acres of Books closed its doors in 2008 to make way for a city redevelopment project, a big question remained: what to do with its acres of bookshelves? The decision was made to let them live on in a way, even after the bookstore was long gone. This summer, workers are using hammers to knock down and harvest an estimated 6-1/2 miles of wooden shelving. Most of the 1930s-era building will be demolished this fall to make way for an art center.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2009 | By Jerry Hirsch and Martin Zimmerman
Artificial or fresh-cut live trees? That may be a dilemma this year for environment-minded shoppers hoping for a green Christmas. Tree sellers have made dueling pitches this season, each extolling the environmental benefits of their trees, and the choice may be a puzzler. Some shoppers are ignoring both, going instead for living trees in pots. Many factors go into a Christmas tree purchase, including family tradition, price and ease of care. But increasingly, environmental concerns are also part of the equation.
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