Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReuven Frank
IN THE NEWS

Reuven Frank

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 4, 1986 | Associated Press
Former NBC News president and award-winning documentary producer Reuven Frank said today he will leave NBC after 36 years when his contract expires in February, the latest casualty of network cost-cutting. Frank, 65, was producer of the network's evening news broadcast, "The Huntley-Brinkley Report," and was president of the news division from 1968 to 1973 and from 1982 to 1984. His 1962 documentary "The Tunnel," about escape under the Berlin Wall, won an Emmy as best program.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2006 | Scott Collins, Times Staff Writer
Reuven Frank, a pioneering TV news producer and executive whose decision to pair two anchors on one newscast resulted in the groundbreaking 1950s nightly broadcast, "The Huntley-Brinkley Report" on NBC, died Sunday. He was 85. Frank died of complications from pneumonia at a hospital near his New Jersey home, according to NBC News spokeswoman Allison Gollust. A funeral is planned for Wednesday.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2006 | Scott Collins, Times Staff Writer
Reuven Frank, a pioneering TV news producer and executive whose decision to pair two anchors on one newscast resulted in the groundbreaking 1950s nightly broadcast, "The Huntley-Brinkley Report" on NBC, died Sunday. He was 85. Frank died of complications from pneumonia at a hospital near his New Jersey home, according to NBC News spokeswoman Allison Gollust. A funeral is planned for Wednesday.
BOOKS
September 1, 1991 | Peter J. Boyer, Boyer is a contributing editor at Vanity Fair and the author of "Who Killed CBS?" (Random House)
Larry Tisch had guile. The billionaire investor with the unvarnished manner and cash-register soul slyly seized control of CBS in 1986 in such a masterful display of guile that he was able to declare that he wasn't really taking over at all--until it was too late. Once in, Tisch managed to fool some of the people some of the time by vowing that he had no intention of selling off CBS' parts--even as he secretly sought deals to sell most of them. He smilingly let the CBS News employees hail him as their savior, even while he ordered the division's near-total retrenchment, including massive firings.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
Reuven Frank was the night city editor of New Jersey's Newark Evening News when he got a call from a pal, Gerald Green, at NBC's television news division. Want to work at NBC?, Green asked. "No," Frank replied. Green, later to write the best-selling novel "The Last Angry Man," got mad. He badgered Frank to give NBC a try. Frank finally did, as a writer. Frank's try, which among other things led to two tours as president of NBC News, has lasted 38 years.
BOOKS
September 1, 1991 | Peter J. Boyer, Boyer is a contributing editor at Vanity Fair and the author of "Who Killed CBS?" (Random House)
Larry Tisch had guile. The billionaire investor with the unvarnished manner and cash-register soul slyly seized control of CBS in 1986 in such a masterful display of guile that he was able to declare that he wasn't really taking over at all--until it was too late. Once in, Tisch managed to fool some of the people some of the time by vowing that he had no intention of selling off CBS' parts--even as he secretly sought deals to sell most of them. He smilingly let the CBS News employees hail him as their savior, even while he ordered the division's near-total retrenchment, including massive firings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1997
Having worked in some recent underdog campaigns, I share Reuven Frank's (Commentary, Jan. 6) disdain for political ads. However, I feel that a solution to the problem of campaign financing lies in establishing a truly independent, publicly controlled and financed television channel. In addition to reducing the need of politicians and candidates to constantly raise money, it would broaden the political economy by having ongoing debates on issues, rather than just during election periods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1997
I find Reuven Frank's ("Don't Hide the News From Hidden Cameras," Commentary, Feb. 17) quote [from a British press tycoon], "News is what someone somewhere else wants to supress," to be a prime example of the kind of arrogance that has the American public fed up with the news media. News is not what someone somewhere else wants to supress. News is anything true, important and what a person does not have a reasonable right to keep private. Maybe that was the message of the Food Lion jury.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1988 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Starting July 5, NBC News will go prime time for six one-hour news specials on Tuesday nights at 10 p.m. PDT, with five of the broadcasts anchored by Connie Chung, network sources said Thursday. The sixth, anchored by John Palmer, is a documentary on pensions, the final program for NBC produced by Reuven Frank, who has twice headed NBC News. When he signs off at NBC, he'll be a senior Gannett Fellow at Columbia University. NBC's summer string of Tuesday news specials will be preempted Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1997
I read the column by Reuven Frank (Commentary, Jan. 6) in which he advocated banning political ads from television. I think in this day and age, when the majority of people obtain their news in quick doses from TV, that his idea would be a major disservice to the public. My suggestion is that a rule be passed that all political ads should be a minimum of five minutes long. In that way, politicians could not hide behind half-truths, name-calling and innuendo. They would be forced to say something substantive for a change.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
Reuven Frank was the night city editor of New Jersey's Newark Evening News when he got a call from a pal, Gerald Green, at NBC's television news division. Want to work at NBC?, Green asked. "No," Frank replied. Green, later to write the best-selling novel "The Last Angry Man," got mad. He badgered Frank to give NBC a try. Frank finally did, as a writer. Frank's try, which among other things led to two tours as president of NBC News, has lasted 38 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1986 | JAY SHARBUTT
Reuven Frank, an Emmy-winning documentary producer and twice president of NBC News, said Thursday that NBC has told him his contract won't be renewed when it expires early next year, and he'll leave NBC then. Frank, 65, with NBC since 1950, retired from the company two years ago, but has produced three documentaries for NBC News under a contract with the news division and a production company he heads, the Formerly Corp.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|