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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1991
Your writers haven't been adhering to the Calendar stylebook. You printed an article about censorship that doesn't paint the Rev. Donald E. Wildmon as a drooling Neanderthal villain. In fact, it doesn't concern Wildmon or Sen. Jesse Helms at all. What gives? Oh, wait a minute. This time, it's not Wildmon but those who are not only boycotting "Basic Instinct" but also disrupting the filming and demanding changes in the script. Sorry, I didn't catch that these are "vocal activists," not censors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1993 | STEVEN HERBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pair of conservative activists, better known for criticizing TV programs than supporting them, are trying to save NBC's low-rated "Against the Grain" through letter-writing campaigns to its sponsors and network. NBC Entertainment President Warren Littlefield and series producer Dave Johnson welcome the efforts by Rev. Donald E. Wildmon and L. Brent Bozell, but everyone involved acknowledges that the odds of the Texas high-school football drama getting renewed are long.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1991
My thanks to the Rev. Donald E. Wildmon for his warnings concerning the premiere of Norman Lear's new sitcom, "Sunday Dinner" (Morning Report, May 21). I wasn't sure I wanted to watch this show when it premieres June 2. But now that Wildmon has explained that it promotes "New Age/secular humanist religion," I'm champing at the bit. What Wildmon may not realize is that I have my own views. "Sunday Dinner" may have a point of view I find appealing or appalling, but it will not change my personal credo against my better judgment.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1992
It is interesting to read and compare two pieces in Calendar about censorship: the first, Pristin's report on PC in Hollywood; the second, on the Rev. Donald E. Wildmon's attempts to censor a television program ("Wildmon Blocks U.S. Airing of British Program," Jan. 2). There's no doubt that PC can go too far, but there's also no question that the greatest threat to free speech and expression in this country comes from those in the Christian right wing. It's a measure of their success that they do keep programs off television and that they have managed to convince mainstream America that PC is the real villain.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1992
It is interesting to read and compare two pieces in Calendar about censorship: the first, Pristin's report on PC in Hollywood; the second, on the Rev. Donald E. Wildmon's attempts to censor a television program ("Wildmon Blocks U.S. Airing of British Program," Jan. 2). There's no doubt that PC can go too far, but there's also no question that the greatest threat to free speech and expression in this country comes from those in the Christian right wing. It's a measure of their success that they do keep programs off television and that they have managed to convince mainstream America that PC is the real villain.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1991
Regarding Robert Foxworth's "Matching Wildmon's Boycott With a 'Buycott' " (June 3): Foxworth uses buzz phrases like "cherish their freedoms" and "marketplace of ideas" to create the impression that a constitutionally guaranteed liberty is at stake. Evidently, in his mind, pornography and sexual aberration are "ideas" essential to an American's pursuit of liberty and the realization of the good life. The Rev. Donald E. Wildmon does not advocate censorship. He serves primarily as an informant to a large segment of the population as to the source of advertising dollars for various TV programs; this informed segment can then make its wishes known to the suppliers of those dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1991
Tom Blair's and Bert Enserink's June 10 letters in response to Robert Foxworth's June 3 column "Matching Wildmon's Boycott With a 'Buycott' " attempted to paint the Rev. Donald E. Wildmon as someone who offers "legitimate criticism" of "pornography and sexual aberration." Let's set the record straight. Wildmon is part of a politicized right-wing religious movement: Christian fundamentalism. Most people are familiar with the attacks fundamentalists have made on controversial works such as the art of Robert Mapplethorpe.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1993 | STEVEN HERBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pair of conservative activists, better known for criticizing TV programs than supporting them, are trying to save NBC's low-rated "Against the Grain" through letter-writing campaigns to its sponsors and network. NBC Entertainment President Warren Littlefield and series producer Dave Johnson welcome the efforts by Rev. Donald E. Wildmon and L. Brent Bozell, but everyone involved acknowledges that the odds of the Texas high-school football drama getting renewed are long.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1990 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
What did it mean? The half-page ad--echoing the tone of loyalty oaths that cowardly television networks made their employees sign during the "Red-scare" frenzy in the decade following World War II--appeared in several hundred newspapers Nov. 4-5. Out of the blue. No explanation. This was the title: "An Open Letter to the American People." This was the text: "Burger King wishes to go on record as supporting traditional American values on television, especially the importance of the family.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1992 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Clearing the Way: A Federal Appeals Court in New Orleans has lifted an injunction and cleared the way for "Damned in the U.S.A." to be shown in this country. The British documentary about censorship in America has been under legal attack by the Rev. Donald E. Wildmon, the anti-pornography.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1991
Tom Blair's and Bert Enserink's June 10 letters in response to Robert Foxworth's June 3 column "Matching Wildmon's Boycott With a 'Buycott' " attempted to paint the Rev. Donald E. Wildmon as someone who offers "legitimate criticism" of "pornography and sexual aberration." Let's set the record straight. Wildmon is part of a politicized right-wing religious movement: Christian fundamentalism. Most people are familiar with the attacks fundamentalists have made on controversial works such as the art of Robert Mapplethorpe.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1991
Regarding Robert Foxworth's "Matching Wildmon's Boycott With a 'Buycott' " (June 3): Foxworth uses buzz phrases like "cherish their freedoms" and "marketplace of ideas" to create the impression that a constitutionally guaranteed liberty is at stake. Evidently, in his mind, pornography and sexual aberration are "ideas" essential to an American's pursuit of liberty and the realization of the good life. The Rev. Donald E. Wildmon does not advocate censorship. He serves primarily as an informant to a large segment of the population as to the source of advertising dollars for various TV programs; this informed segment can then make its wishes known to the suppliers of those dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1991
My thanks to the Rev. Donald E. Wildmon for his warnings concerning the premiere of Norman Lear's new sitcom, "Sunday Dinner" (Morning Report, May 21). I wasn't sure I wanted to watch this show when it premieres June 2. But now that Wildmon has explained that it promotes "New Age/secular humanist religion," I'm champing at the bit. What Wildmon may not realize is that I have my own views. "Sunday Dinner" may have a point of view I find appealing or appalling, but it will not change my personal credo against my better judgment.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1991
Your writers haven't been adhering to the Calendar stylebook. You printed an article about censorship that doesn't paint the Rev. Donald E. Wildmon as a drooling Neanderthal villain. In fact, it doesn't concern Wildmon or Sen. Jesse Helms at all. What gives? Oh, wait a minute. This time, it's not Wildmon but those who are not only boycotting "Basic Instinct" but also disrupting the filming and demanding changes in the script. Sorry, I didn't catch that these are "vocal activists," not censors.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1991
Thank you Howard Rosenberg for " 'Tongues Untied' Deserves to Be Seen and Heard," especially your observations regarding the Rev. Donald E. Wildmon and columnist James J. Kilpatrick. It is outrageous that as a nation, we sanction--if not celebrate--everything from war in Panama and the Gulf to incredible violence on TV and in the movies. Yet, the hysteria and the outcry is deafening when two men are seen in a loving, affectionate embrace.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Did he or didn't he? CBS is denying that the cartoon character Mighty Mouse snorted cocaine in a cartoon shown last April, but the Rev. Donald E. Wildmon, longtime TV industry critic and head of the American Family Assn. in Tupelo, Miss., said the super-rodent did indeed use cocaine. The controversy involves an episode of "Mighty Mouse: The New Adventures," titled "The Littlest Tramp" and broadcast April 23.
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