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Reva B Tooley

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1988
Former Los Angeles Police Commission President Reva B. Tooley has returned to the commission as the replacement for Barbara L. Schlei, a labor lawyer who submitted her resignation after serving a four-year term. Tooley, appointed to the job by Mayor Tom Bradley and approved by the City Council, gained a reputation as a critic of Police Chief Daryl F. Gates before leaving the Police Commission in 1984 to work first as an editor at the Los Angeles Herald Examiner and later as a free-lance writer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1991 | JOHN L. MITCHELL and GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On the heels of the resignations of two longtime Police Commissioners, Los Angeles City Councilmen Robert Farrell and Hal Bernson on Tuesday called for a review of the financial disclosure requirements mandated by the city's new ethics law. Commission President Herbert F. Boeckmann and Vice President Reva B. Tooley said their resignations Monday were prompted by the requirements, which they called "an invasion of privacy."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1991 | JOHN L. MITCHELL and GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On the heels of the resignations of two longtime Police Commissioners, Los Angeles City Councilmen Robert Farrell and Hal Bernson on Tuesday called for a review of the financial disclosure requirements mandated by the city's new ethics law. Commission President Herbert F. Boeckmann and Vice President Reva B. Tooley said their resignations Monday were prompted by the requirements, which they called "an invasion of privacy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1991 | JANE FRITSCH and JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two of the five members of the Los Angeles Board of Police Commissioners resigned Monday rather than disclose their financial assets under the city's new ethics law. In a letter to Mayor Tom Bradley, Commission President Herbert F. Boeckmann and board member Reva B. Tooley called the law "an invasion of privacy" and said it "puts volunteer public service in Los Angeles beyond our reach." Bradley expressed "deep regret" at the resignations, which he said are effective immediately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1991 | JANE FRITSCH and JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two of the five members of the Los Angeles Board of Police Commissioners resigned Monday rather than disclose their financial assets under the city's new ethics law. In a letter to Mayor Tom Bradley, Commission President Herbert F. Boeckmann and board member Reva B. Tooley called the law "an invasion of privacy" and said it "puts volunteer public service in Los Angeles beyond our reach." Bradley expressed "deep regret" at the resignations, which he said are effective immediately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1990 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday concluded that a protest by striking janitors last summer turned violent because police were overzealous in chasing protesters who refused to disperse and because union organizers were too secretive about their plans. Sixteen people were injured and more than 40 were arrested during the June 15 confrontation, which took place as the Justice for Janitors march moved on Century City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1988 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
Departing Los Angeles Police Commissioner Barbara L. Schlei urged Tuesday that the Police Department dismantle its 42-officer anti-terrorist division, re-examine all of its undercover programs and rotate all officers, particularly those assigned to narcotics enforcement, every five years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1990 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Tom Bradley on Tuesday appointed Melanie Lomax, a longtime civil rights attorney and political supporter, to the Board of Police Commissioners--continuing his efforts to strengthen civilian oversight of the massive Los Angeles Police Department. The appointment, which requires City Council approval, apparently marks the first time that most of the members on the powerful civilian panel that monitors the LAPD will come from the minority community.
NEWS
September 28, 1988 | DAVID FREED and WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writers
Mayor Tom Bradley on Tuesday ordered the Los Angeles Police Commission to investigate the Police Department's little-known Special Investigations Section, which follows career criminals but often ignores opportunities to prevent them from committing violent crimes. Bradley, who spent 22 years in the Police Department, said he did not know that the unit existed until he read about it in The Times. "I doubt that the (Police) Commission is even aware of this special unit," Bradley said.
NEWS
March 15, 1991 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Mayor Tom Bradley has refrained from calling for the ouster of Police Chief Daryl F. Gates, his chief of staff has been busy orchestrating moves to "turn up the heat" on Gates and force him to resign over last week's police beating, it was learned Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1988
Former Los Angeles Police Commission President Reva B. Tooley has returned to the commission as the replacement for Barbara L. Schlei, a labor lawyer who submitted her resignation after serving a four-year term. Tooley, appointed to the job by Mayor Tom Bradley and approved by the City Council, gained a reputation as a critic of Police Chief Daryl F. Gates before leaving the Police Commission in 1984 to work first as an editor at the Los Angeles Herald Examiner and later as a free-lance writer.
NEWS
March 12, 1991 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's toughest ethics-in-government law has turned into a bureaucratic nightmare. Two months after a new ethics law went into effect in Los Angeles, city officials say they do not know what is required of them, and the city commission charged with enforcing the law still lacks an executive director and staff.
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