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OPINION
December 13, 2004
Re "Gov.'s Deal May Worsen Fund Crisis," Dec 8: California's projected budget gap for the coming fiscal year is $6.7 billion. Elizabeth Hill, the state's legislative analyst, estimates the deficit could be close to $10 billion in budget year 2006-07 without cuts, tax increases or a combination of the two. How then in good conscience can Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger even consider calling a special election in 2005, which could cost taxpayers as...
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NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
A tiny northern Florida city that received national notoriety for issuing thousands of speeding tickets on its funky stretch of highway will be spared from death. State lawmakers Friday dropped their threat to dissolve Hampton, a 1-square-mile city located an hour's drive south of Jacksonville. Auditors in February reported that the small cadre of officials in the city of about 500 residents mismanaged the city's bank accounts, credit cards and collections. The city had just three full-time employees: a clerk, a police chief and a water manager.
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BUSINESS
October 30, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Airlines still make most of their money flying you from point A to point B. But a bigger share of that revenue now comes from selling you food, drinks and entertainment during the trip. Airlines worldwide are expected to collect $42.6 billion from passenger fees, the sale of frequent flier miles and other sources in 2013, an 18% increase from last year. The forecast by Wisconsin-based IdeaWorksCompany , a consultant to the airline industry, also shows that such fees and commissions have become a bigger part of the airline industry's revenue stream.
SCIENCE
December 6, 2012 | By Julie Cart
Energy development on public lands and waters pumped more than $12 billion into federal coffers in 2012, $1 billion more than the previous year, according to the U.S. Department of the Interior. "These revenues reflect significant domestic energy production under President Obama's all-of-the-above energy strategy and provide a vital revenue stream for federal and state governments and American Indian communities," Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said in a statement. Money from the extraction of oil, gas and coal from federal land is divvied up several ways, including substantial deposits into the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which purchases land to set aside for conservation.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
A tiny northern Florida city that received national notoriety for issuing thousands of speeding tickets on its funky stretch of highway will be spared from death. State lawmakers Friday dropped their threat to dissolve Hampton, a 1-square-mile city located an hour's drive south of Jacksonville. Auditors in February reported that the small cadre of officials in the city of about 500 residents mismanaged the city's bank accounts, credit cards and collections. The city had just three full-time employees: a clerk, a police chief and a water manager.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Airlines still make most of their money flying you from point A to point B. But a bigger share of that revenue now comes from selling you food, drinks and entertainment during the trip. Airlines worldwide are expected to collect $42.6 billion from passenger fees, the sale of frequent flier miles and other sources in 2013, an 18% increase from last year. The forecast by Wisconsin-based IdeaWorksCompany , a consultant to the airline industry, also shows that such fees and commissions have become a bigger part of the airline industry's revenue stream.
SPORTS
October 17, 2012 | By Gary Klein, Los Angeles Times
A photo of Matt Barkley dozing on a couch in the McKay Center made the rounds Tuesday on Twitter, courtesy of USC linebacker Hayes Pullard. Barkley retweeted the photo and vowed revenge on Pullard, showing that the senior quarterback has not lost his sense of humor during a season in which he and the Trojans' offense have struggled to live up to expectations. As Coach Lane Kiffin noted this week, Barkley was "not going to be jumping up and down" with joy last Saturday after Kiffin turned conservative and Barkley passed only 20 times in a victory over Washington at CenturyLink Field in Seattle.
SPORTS
March 18, 2003 | Ross Newhan
So, the Oakland Athletics won't make a contract offer to shortstop Miguel Tejada because baseball's economic system wasn't sufficiently repaired by the new bargaining agreement, their small-market revenue won't permit it and they don't want to insult the American League's most valuable player, who is eligible to leave as a free agent when the new season ends. Co-owner Steve Schott reaffirmed all of that by phone from his Santa Clara office Monday, but is it that simple, that clear-cut?
OPINION
May 16, 2004
Re "Chalk One Up to Advisory Panels," May 12: The City Council approved an 11% increase in water rates instead of 18% for the Department of Water and Power. Great news! But wait, we are told that city officials managed to find $9 million from the DWP to add to city coffers ("Panel OKs Hahn's Budget," May 12). So the city is getting creative in putting the squeeze on taxpayers without appearing to raise taxes. What's the matter? Have they run out of taxes and fees to raise? Dorothy Garven Los Angeles
SCIENCE
December 6, 2012 | By Julie Cart
Energy development on public lands and waters pumped more than $12 billion into federal coffers in 2012, $1 billion more than the previous year, according to the U.S. Department of the Interior. "These revenues reflect significant domestic energy production under President Obama's all-of-the-above energy strategy and provide a vital revenue stream for federal and state governments and American Indian communities," Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said in a statement. Money from the extraction of oil, gas and coal from federal land is divvied up several ways, including substantial deposits into the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which purchases land to set aside for conservation.
SPORTS
October 17, 2012 | By Gary Klein, Los Angeles Times
A photo of Matt Barkley dozing on a couch in the McKay Center made the rounds Tuesday on Twitter, courtesy of USC linebacker Hayes Pullard. Barkley retweeted the photo and vowed revenge on Pullard, showing that the senior quarterback has not lost his sense of humor during a season in which he and the Trojans' offense have struggled to live up to expectations. As Coach Lane Kiffin noted this week, Barkley was "not going to be jumping up and down" with joy last Saturday after Kiffin turned conservative and Barkley passed only 20 times in a victory over Washington at CenturyLink Field in Seattle.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2011 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
A year that began with a bang was interrupted by a quake, and now is ending with a whimper. Next year is projected to be better — but not for everybody. The March earthquake and tsunami in Japan, which put a months-long halt to automobile production, combined with a moribund job market and a steady drumbeat of bad economic news to slam the brakes on television advertising sales. Early in 2011, economists predicted that TV advertising revenue in the U.S. would increase 6% this year to an all-time high.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2011 | Kim Christensen and Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
Jewish mysticism is the spiritual bedrock of the Kabbalah Centre, but its finances are built on real estate investments, donations and the marketing of religious books, classes and merchandise. As a tax-exempt religious organization, the center is not required to disclose any aspect of its finances, which are under investigation by the IRS. But public records, lawsuits and a former high-ranking employee's resume all provide glimpses of its balance sheet and business dealings. An online resume posted by Nelson Boord Jr., a former chief financial officer who left the center in 2009, said it had annual revenue of $60 million, a $60-million investment fund and $200 million in real estate holdings around the world.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2011 | By Salvador Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
Ben Chinn likes to text as much as the next guy — he just doesn't like to pay for it. Chinn, 37, sends most of his text messages free of charge with Google Voice and a smartphone application. He also pays $5 a month for up to 200 messages on his AT&T mobile phone plan. "With everything with the mobile carriers, I feel I'm getting nickeled and dimed," said Chinn, of San Francisco. "I resent paying so much for text messaging, and I feel that it's not a reasonable price to pay for something that costs the carriers next to nothing.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2011 | By Joe Flint and Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
In Chase Carey's first stint at Rupert Murdoch's News Corp., he was instrumental in reinventing Fox and turning it into a credible contender against the big three networks. For his encore, he wants to reinvent the media business. Since leaving satellite broadcaster DirecTV almost 22 months ago to succeed Peter Chernin as the No. 2 at News Corp. under Murdoch, Carey has moved quickly to wrangle new sources of revenue for the media giant that owns broadcast and cable networks, newspapers, a movie studio and MySpace.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2011 | Kim Christensen and Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
Jewish mysticism is the spiritual bedrock of the Kabbalah Centre, but its finances are built on real estate investments, donations and the marketing of religious books, classes and merchandise. As a tax-exempt religious organization, the center is not required to disclose any aspect of its finances, which are under investigation by the IRS. But public records, lawsuits and a former high-ranking employee's resume all provide glimpses of its balance sheet and business dealings. An online resume posted by Nelson Boord Jr., a former chief financial officer who left the center in 2009, said it had annual revenue of $60 million, a $60-million investment fund and $200 million in real estate holdings around the world.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2011 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
A year that began with a bang was interrupted by a quake, and now is ending with a whimper. Next year is projected to be better — but not for everybody. The March earthquake and tsunami in Japan, which put a months-long halt to automobile production, combined with a moribund job market and a steady drumbeat of bad economic news to slam the brakes on television advertising sales. Early in 2011, economists predicted that TV advertising revenue in the U.S. would increase 6% this year to an all-time high.
OPINION
February 14, 2011
The Los Angeles Public Library system is one of the city's most valuable assets, but its budget is being stretched increasingly thin. Millions of dollars that used to pay for library staff and book purchases now have to be spent on utilities and employee benefits, forcing deep cuts in library services. In response, library supporters have advanced Measure L, which would mandate that more dollars be spent on the library without raising taxes. It's a laudable goal, but it's a bad solution to the difficult budget problems caused by the economic downturn.
NEWS
April 20, 2010 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
It's 7 p.m. on a recent Saturday and every seat in the 294-seat theater inside the AMC 16 Burbank is filled. The crowd isn't there to watch "How to Train Your Dragon" or "Alice in Wonderland," but a not-so-family-friendly kind of entertainment: mixed martial arts. Tonight's feature is a highly anticipated Ultimate Fighting Championship face-off between Brazilian jiujitsu black belt Georges St. Pierre from Montreal and cocky English fighter Dan "The Outlaw" Hardy. When the action starts and St. Pierre scores his first "takedown," fans leap from their seats, pump their fists in the air and whoop wildly.
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