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May 17, 1986
About the letter in the May 10 Viewpoint complaining about Ken Landreaux not signing autographs for children: Why would any parent raise a child to revere and worship baseball players or any other athletes, many of whom are drug users, boozers and womanizers? Not what you call ideal role models. I'm raising my kids to idolize rock musicians. BILL JACOBS Sacramento
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NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Christopher Reynolds
The world is full of Green Dragon pubs, inns, taverns, grills and restaurants - in part because of American history, in part because of J.R.R. Tolkien's imagination, in part because the name just sounds cool. And now there's another one. The Green Dragon Tavern & Museum opened Feb. 12  in Carlsbad, about five miles south of Camp Pendleton. It pays homage to this country's revolutionary roots - not a bad angle for a watering hole neighbored by many thousands of Marines. It is housed in a two-story red brick building, keeps about 20 beers on tap and seats about 250 diners and drinkers with dinner entrees priced $15-$50.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1999
Re "Cleaning Up Copy in 'Kissed,' " by Kristen Walbolt and Tracy Boucher (Riffs, May 6): I revere copy editors. They are my soul siblings, for I am a fact checker (for Modern Maturity magazine). Together we worship grammatical accuracy and arcane bits of information. When copy editors and fact checkers huddle, writers go pale. Copy editors are the only people I know who don't flinch when I ask, "What is the source of this information?" They share my deep concern that the whole comprises the parts, that "The" is included in the names of The New Yorker and The New York Times, and that the word "zydeco" is an alteration of the French word for beans.
WORLD
March 10, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - If nothing else, the slaying of cartel boss Nazario Moreno Gonzalez by Mexican soldiers may have burst the bubble of mysticism that had made him one of the stranger figures to emerge in the country's drug war. Moreno, whose nicknames included "El Mas Loco" ("The Craziest"), was a founder of Michoacan state's La Familia drug cartel and its offshoot, the Knights Templar - groups that have moved massive amounts of methamphetamine and other drugs north to the United States.
NEWS
June 5, 1985 | Associated Press
Television news reporter Susan Wornick was sentenced Tuesday to three months in jail for refusing to identify a source who, with his back to the camera, claimed he saw police officers looting a drugstore. However, the sentence was stayed for at least one night by state Supreme Court Justice Neil Lynch, who said he would decide by this morning whether the case should be heard by the full Supreme Court or whether Wornick should be imprisoned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1995
Assemblyman Mickey Conroy's idea that corporal punishment should be rekindled is both shocking and disturbing. Has our society been so totally consumed with violence that our solutions to everything is to immediately pick up a weapon and physically instill morals and values? Reinstating paddling would terminate school as a safe place where students can be free from fear. How can we expect young people to trust and revere teachers if, at the same time, they must worry about the threat of being paddled for provoking the anger and contempt of these same people?
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
As a role model, Santa's got some health issues. He's overweight, and he zooms around the world in terrible weather and drops down soot-filled chimneys. But worst of all in the mind of anti-smoking crusader Pamela McColl is that “stump of a pipe he held tight in his teeth.” “I just really don't think Santa should be smoking in the 21stcentury,” McColl said by telephone. And she did something about it - published a version of the beloved poem “A Visit From St. Nicholas” with the smoking references - including illustrations - excised.
NEWS
May 22, 1999 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The call came on the eve of his Los Angeles concert, just as he was leaving his home in Mexico. We have your son. Follow our instructions. Don't make trouble. It was a year ago, and Vicente Fernandez was about to headline four sold-out shows at the Pico Rivera Sports Arena, his annual Memorial Day pilgrimage to the Eastside suburbs of L.A. Now this voice, saying his 33-year-old son, his namesake, was being held for a ransom of millions.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1997
I was sorry to see that the only letter you received, or printed, in response to the article about Della Reese-Lett ("Preaching What She Practices" by Judith Michaelson, Nov. 16) was such an across-the-board attack of her acting, integrity and principles. Della Reese is a fine singer and actress. Her role as Tess in "Touched by an Angel" has added dimension because it conveys her own deep spiritual nature and beliefs. Many lives have been touched by the simple, yet profound, premise of the show--that God can enter our lives directly and that His angels surround us whether we are aware of them or not. Yes, it's just a television program; these are just stories that may entertain us, and why not?
SPORTS
January 20, 1999 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A sprinter who became one of Finland's most revered sports heroes on Tuesday resigned her post on the International Olympic Committee, the first IOC member toppled by the bribery scandal roiling the Olympic movement. Pirjo Haggman, 47, one of the first women to become an IOC member and a track champion so beloved in Finland that she has been depicted on a postage stamp, delivered her resignation to IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch in Lausanne, Switzerland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2014 | By Jessica Gelt
Anthony "Tony" Lovett, a ribald humorist and de facto Los Angeles historian who co-wrote "L.A. Bizarro: The Insider's Guide to the Obscure, the Absurd and the Perverse in Los Angeles," has died. He was 52. Lovett died in his sleep at home in Simi Valley on Sunday, his wife, Randi, confirmed. The cause has not been determined. A freelance writer whose articles appeared in Rolling Stone, Playboy and other publications, Lovett was also the former publisher and editor-in-chief of Adult Video News.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
A red-brick driveway leads to this Paul Revere Williams-designed Tudor set along the water of Toluca Lake. The elegant formal entry and the library, with its wood-beam ceiling and built-in bookcases, are in keeping with the architect's traditional style. Location: 9956 Toluca Lake Ave., Toluca Lake 91602 Asking price: $8 million Year built: 1938 House size: Five bedrooms, six bathrooms, 7,228 square feet Lot size: 1.02 acres Features: Dark wood flooring, recessed lighting, leaded windows, intricate molding, curved staircase, bar, wine cellar, covered patio, outdoor fireplace, gazebo, swimming pool, private dock About the area: In the first half of 2013, 84 single-family homes sold in the 91602 ZIP Code at a median price of $842,000, according to DataQuick.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2013 | By Martha Groves and Louis Sahagun
To see teacher Rose Gilbert - a nonstop, 5-foot dynamo - in front of a high school classroom was to see a master at work. "I'm on fire," she would tell her 12th-graders in Room 204 at Palisades Charter High School, emphasizing the point by wearing a red plastic firefighter's helmet. Yet, even after more than half a century of imparting a love of Homer, Camus, Faulkner and Joyce to her youthful charges, she never seemed to burn out. Each semester for more than 50 years, into her 90s, Gilbert lectured on dozens of classic works, including "The Great Gatsby," "The Iliad" and "The Stranger.
WORLD
December 6, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Nelson Mandela didn't coin the term "Rainbow Nation" or the phrase "Proudly South African. " But the optimism, determination and compassion of the country at its best owed everything to him. In recent years, however, South Africa under the leadership of the African National Congress that Mandela loved is often quite different - shoddy, corrupt and incompetent. In short, depressingly like other African countries betrayed by liberation movements. While life has gradually improved for many, problems once attributed to apartheid stubbornly remain.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
After Christian Zacharias had conducted the Los Angeles Philharmonic in plush, punchy, skillfully proportioned yet not always stirring performances of works by Stravinsky, Bach, Schubert and Schumann, I turned to the Marx Brothers. Groucho had answers for many of life's predicaments. The 1946 screwball entertainment "A Night in Casablanca" happened to be especially relevant. Friday's program in Walt Disney Concert Hall began with Stravinsky's "Danses Concertantes" in its first complete performance by the L.A. Phil, even though the antic 20-minute ballet score, also intended as a concert work, was written in Los Angeles and had its premiere at the Wilshire Ebell Theatre in 1942.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
J.J. Cale, the songwriter behind Eric Clapton classics such as “Cocaine” and “After Midnight,” died Friday at the age of 74. The singer-songwriter's official website confirmed Cale passed away at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla after suffering a heart attack Friday night. Born John Weldon Cale in Oklahoma City, he's revered for pioneering the “Tulsa Sound,” a blend of rockabilly, country, jazz and blues. PHOTOS: Notable deaths 2013 Cale, who scored minor solo hits like "Crazy Mama" and "Lies," is better known for tunes like “After Midnight” and “Cocaine” which Clapton covered and turned into smashes.
NEWS
January 6, 1997 | LARRY HARNISCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Light does not easily penetrate the clouded story of Betty Short, a 22-year-old unemployed cashier and waitress whose body was found cut in half and gruesomely mutilated 50 years ago this month in a vacant lot in Southwest Los Angeles. The unsolved killing remains Los Angeles' premier myth noir, a tale of a tragic beauty clad in black, prowling the night life, a cautionary fable that rings as true today as it did in 1947. The legend insists on a shadowed, epic tone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2003 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
The chirping of birds and the whoops of children frolicking in the grassy hollow give the hilltop a sense of serenity now. It was different 40 years ago. There was a gurgling sound, a warning scream and finally a whooshing roar as death and destruction swept down a ridge into a Los Angeles neighborhood. The Baldwin Hills Dam collapsed with the fury of a thousand cloudbursts, sending a 50-foot wall of water down Cloverdale Avenue and slamming into homes and cars on Dec. 14, 1963.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Four homes designed by the late architect Paul R. Williams, popular with generations of celebrities, are listed for sale in the Combined L.A./Westside Multiple Listing Service. From least to most expensive: A traditional-style home in Hancock Park is priced at $3.6 million.  Built in 1931, the well-maintained house has been restored. Rooms include a large entry foyer, paneled living room, formal dining room, family room, garden loggia, four bedrooms and four bathrooms.  Greg Moesser of Sotheby's International Realty is the listing agent for the house ; An English-style home in La Canada Flintridge is up for sale at $6.89 million.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2013 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
He's one of the hottest architects in Hollywood: The houses designed by Paul Revere Williams have attracted generations of stars - Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz, Bill Cosby, Denzel Washington. Actress Debra Messing recently sold a home he designed in Bel-Air for $11.4 million in less than a month - a rapid exchange for a transaction at that price. She had bought the traditional two-story house from film star Renee Zellweger a decade earlier. Williams' homes caught the imagination of the entertainment elite starting in the late 1920s and are still sought-after today, more than three decades after his death.
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