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Reverse Discrimination

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Oct. 15 trial date was set Tuesday in a lawsuit by two city fire captains who alleged they were victims of reverse discrimination for being punished for lacing Firefighter Tennie Pierce's meal with dog food in 2004. In their complaint, John Tohill and Chris Burton said they had not known that dog food was put in Pierce's meal. They also alleged in their complaint, filed in October, that Pierce initially told them he did not think it was a racial incident but later changed his story.
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OPINION
June 27, 2013
Re "Affirmative action lives on," Editorial, June 25 There is nothing admirable about the Supreme Court's ruling on affirmative action. Universities and corporations may benefit from diverse ideas, but using race and ethnicity as a means to achieve this implies that people of the same race or ethnicity share the same point of view. That is absurd. Affirmative action is a backward policy that divides Americans according to racial and ethnic lines. In an attempt to compensate for past injustices, it replaces old wrongs with new wrongs and inflames racial and ethnic tensions by giving preferential treatment to people of certain ethnic groups at the expense of others.
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OPINION
May 12, 1991 | Ruben Navarrette Jr., Ruben Navarrette Jr. will pursue a doctorate in education at UCLA this fall
Their young eyes stare at me with a hint of skepticism, and perhaps a bit of anger. With more courage than common sense, I have come as a guest speaker to a government class at the high school I attended not long ago. Invited to defend an educational program that is continually under siege by those who want racial equity without sacrifice, I have come to confront an old friend--Allan Bakke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Oct. 15 trial date was set Tuesday in a lawsuit by two city fire captains who alleged they were victims of reverse discrimination for being punished for lacing Firefighter Tennie Pierce's meal with dog food in 2004. In their complaint, John Tohill and Chris Burton said they had not known that dog food was put in Pierce's meal. They also alleged in their complaint, filed in October, that Pierce initially told them he did not think it was a racial incident but later changed his story.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Listen to the two men even briefly, and the similarities between Robert (Kenny) Wilks and Jackie Barton are apparent: Both graduated from Birmingham high schools in 1967, Wilks the son of a steelworker, Barton of a railroad man. Both now are Birmingham firefighters, one 40, the other 41. Both work out of Fire Station 10 in Avondale, 20 blocks due east of downtown. The differences between the two men, however, are even more apparent. Wilks is white, Barton black.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2001 | Associated Press
Ford Motor Co. agreed to pay $10.5 million to settle two class-action lawsuits accusing the auto maker of discriminating against older white men in the name of diversity. About 620 current and former Ford employees could receive some of the money, plaintiffs' attorneys said. Some will get as much as $100,000.
NEWS
February 27, 1989 | From United Press International
White college students who believe their black counterparts receive better treatment have ignited recent incidents of campus racism, according to a member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. Mary Frances Berry told the Pittsburgh Press on Sunday that racial incidents at Penn State, Stanford and the University of Michigan may have been caused by students who believed they have suffered reverse discrimination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1994
A state appellate court has upheld a landmark settlement in which the Los Angeles Unified School District agreed to overhaul its school funding practices by 1996, equalizing the amount of money given to schools in affluent and poorer neighborhoods. A group of parents from the Westside had sought to overturn the so-called Rodriguez consent decree settlement through a reverse discrimination-style lawsuit alleging that schools in wealthy neighborhoods would suffer if money was taken from them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1992
Ratification of a consent decree boosting minority promotions within the Los Angeles Police Department was delayed Monday after three white male officers filed a last-minute legal objection. Instead, the agreement will be reviewed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles on Aug. 10, authorities said. Prompted by legal complaints by black and Latino officers who said they were denied promotions, pay raises and prestigious assignments, the consent decree was approved by the City Council in November.
NEWS
September 27, 1989
Contending that his clients want a "level playing field," a lawyer representing seven white San Francisco police officers filed a "reverse discrimination" suit to obtain "a colorblind and sex-blind opportunity to advance." In the Superior Court complaint, attorney Robert E. Gyemant claimed that less-qualified minority officers have been promoted in order to meet "racial quotas" set a decade ago by a court-ordered affirmative action plan.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2001 | Associated Press
Ford Motor Co. agreed to pay $10.5 million to settle two class-action lawsuits accusing the auto maker of discriminating against older white men in the name of diversity. About 620 current and former Ford employees could receive some of the money, plaintiffs' attorneys said. Some will get as much as $100,000.
NEWS
April 19, 1999 | From Reuters
A lawsuit filed for a white first-grader threatens school desegregation policies in Charlotte, N.C., where a landmark ruling 30 years ago cleared the way for busing to integrate public schools nationwide. The federal trial, set to open here today, is the latest attack on racial quotas and busing plans drawn up since the late 1960s by local school boards to end segregation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1999 | MICHAEL LUO and ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Panorama City elementary school principal who said he was beaten unconscious by anti-white assailants had asked the Anti-Defamation League last month for help in dealing with discrimination he was experiencing at the school, a lawyer for the league said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1999 | MICHAEL LUO and ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Panorama City elementary school principal who said he was beaten unconscious by anti-white assailants asked the Anti-Defamation League last month for help in dealing with discrimination against him at his school, where he faced protests that he was not a Latino, a lawyer for the league said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposed settlement to increase goals for hiring female dockworkers in the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach stalled Friday when a federal judge allowed a group of longshoremen to raise allegations that the settlement might result in reverse discrimination. In a three-page written ruling, District Judge Robert M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposed settlement to hire more female longshore workers in the county's ports encountered strong criticism in federal court Thursday, as opponents called the agreement inadequate for women and biased against men. The settlement would require the International Longshore and Warehouse Union to increase the proportion of women in its ranks from 20% to 25% over the next six years in the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.
NEWS
July 11, 1988 | ANN JAPENGA
On the third floor of the Tacoma YWCA, there are 70 arguments in favor of the theory that inequities between the sexes remain late into the 1980s. Each argument takes the form of a bed reserved for a woman driven from her home by a violent spouse or boyfriend. There's the case. Clear enough. There is a trickier debate, however, swirling around the ground floor of the historic, five-story brick Y building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge ruled Thursday against the Los Angeles Police Department in a reverse discrimination case, finding that department officials improperly selected a minority candidate for promotion over more qualified white officers. U.S. District Judge William Keller ruled that Lt. Richard Dyer's civil rights were violated when a less qualified black candidate was chosen for the position of watch commander for the LAPD's air support division.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accused of failing to comply with a 15-year-old federal court order to hire more women, the powerful longshore workers union and a prominent shipping association have agreed to settle contempt of court charges by recruiting more female dockworkers in the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. The pending settlement, which is headed for approval early next year in federal court, involves a civil contempt action against the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Assn.
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