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NEWS
March 3, 2013 | By Booth Moore
PARIS -- Puffy clouds, naked derrieres and Van Eyck paintings. Those were just a few of the images inside the cryptic inspiration scrapbooks placed at each seat for the Celine fall 2013 collection that designer Phoebe Philo presented Sunday afternoon during Paris Fashion Week. The message? Celine was softening up. In other words, exit the too-cool-for-school tomboy and enter the lady. 2013 Fashion Week coverage The look: Womanly tailoring. Dressed up. Peaches-and-cream shades with green and navy blue mixed in. An emphasis on soft textures, such as on a white-and-black tufted cream coat.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
Directed by Derick Martini from a screenplay adapted by Andrea Portes from her own novel,"Hick" is part road movie and part coming-of-age story but mostly plays like some creepy-perv fantasia looking for mileage from the mature-beyond-her-years presence of young star Chloƫ Grace Moretz. As a movie-obsessed 13-year-old who runs away from her barfly parents, Moretz's character finds herself batted between a slightly older grifter-drifter (Blake Lively) and a reckless cowboy (Eddie Redmayne)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2009
"The Stepfather," a PG-13 horror-thriller, also opens today in general release but did not screen for critics. The review will appear online at latimes.com/moviereviews as soon as it is available.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1987
I don't believe it! I think Robert Hilburn has actually topped himself. He's got to be the first "reporter" to go to a concert (Ratt/Poison) and not review it ("Parents Find Peace at Rock Concert," April 13). Instead, he interviews parents at the Long Beach Arena's new "Quiet Room." What's next, Bob? Go to a Bon Jovi concert and review how much it's not like a Springsteen show? Oops, sorry. He's already done that. TARIK M. TRAD Montclair
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2009 | Gary Goldstein
It doesn't take 3-D trickery to see everything coming at you from a mile away in "The Final Destination," the silly and predictable fourth installment in the lucrative thriller series about pretty young people attempting to cheat death. Director David R. Ellis and writer Eric Bress, who previously collaborated on "Final Destination 2," unimaginatively rehash the earlier films' basic premise: Someone foresees a gruesome group death that may or may not play out in reality if the order of the originally envisioned victims can be disrupted.
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