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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2010
The warm and charming "White Wedding" is like "The Hangover" off steroids. It's another get-me-to-the-church-on-time obstacle course but filled with smart social commentary, romantic wisdom, credible complications and memorable characters. Along the way, director Jann Turner (who co-wrote the script with the film's co-leads Kenneth Nkosi and Rapulana Seiphemo) provides an absorbing physical and cultural snapshot of contemporary South Africa that deepens but never burdens this buoyant, energetic effort.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1988
The publication of Bill Steigerwald's article ("Moralistic Tone to ABC's 'Drugs: Why This Plague?' " July 11) under the label television review is poor journalism and is an insult to your readers. It is not a review at all. In no way does it comment on either the quality of the production nor the creative aspects of the program, but rather Mr. Steigerwald has used the column to expound his personal views on the legalization and decriminalization of illicit drugs. Television reviews should be reviews of the program and not a platform to sell the public poison pills.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2010
"Break Ke Baad," an unrated romantic comedy from Reliance Big Pictures also opens Friday in limited release. Its review will appear in Saturday's paper and online as soon as it is available at latimes.com/moviereviews.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2010 | By BETSY SHARKEY, Film Critic
Dear Reader, I'm so sorry, gulp, but "Dear John" is like a very bad relationship with a very beautiful someone: You want it to work, you truly do, but the pain, the guilt, the boredom, the CW soundtrack . . . . And I wish I could say it's not them, it's me, but I really think it's them. The film's very beautiful someones are the ab-riffic Channing Tatum as John, whom director Lasse Hallström wisely keeps either shirtless or in tight tees for most of the film, and that golden girl Amanda Seyfried (" Big Love," "Mamma Mia!"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Film Critic >>>
In "Shutter Island," director Martin Scorsese has created a divinely dark and devious brain tease of a movie in the best noir tradition with its smarter than you'd think cops, their tougher than you'd imagine cases to crack and enough nods to the classic genre for an all-night parlor game. It's 1954, the heart of the Cold War, with a conspiracy theory around every corner, when Leonardo DiCaprio's U.S. Marshal Teddy Daniels and his new partner, played by Mark Ruffalo, are dispatched to an asylum for the criminally insane to investigate a dicey disappearance.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2009 | By Betsy Sharkey FILM CRITIC >>>
Go ahead and pucker up. Because long before "The Princess and the Frog" is over you'll want to smooch the charming couple, air kiss a romantic firefly and hug a voodoo queen in this foot-stomping, smile-inducing, heart-warming animated twist on the old Brothers Grimm frog-prince fairy tale. FOR THE RECORD: "The Princess and the Frog": The review of the animated film "The Princess and the Frog" in Wednesday's Calendar said the lead character Tiana was a maid. She is a waitress.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The involving, thematically rich "Terraferma," directed by Emanuele Crialese from a timely - yet also quite timeless - script he wrote with Vittorio Moroni, is set on a remote Sicilian island whose summer tourist trade has become more lucrative than its longtime, now-dwindling fishing business. However, because of its location, the isle is also a magnet for illegal African immigrants escaping to Europe. One day at sea, the aging Ernesto (Mimmo Cuticchio), a tradition-bound, lifelong fisherman, and his 20-year-old grandson Filippo (Filippo Pucillo)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2010
The ZIP Code for Sidney, Ohio, a city of 20,000 northwest of Columbus, becomes the title of Turner Ross and Bill Ross' "45365," a graceful, affectionate yet clear-eyed portrait of daily Middle America small-town life in which no individuals are interviewed but instead are observed with detachment as they go about their lives. In many ways, Sidney suggests that Norman Rockwell's America still exists. The town center is still dominated by a grand Second Empire-style courthouse, and many well-maintained vintage structures, strung along tree-lined streets, survive.
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