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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2010
"Letters to God," a PG-rated family movie, opens Friday in general release but did not screen for critics. The review will appear online at latimes.com/movies reviews as soon as it is available.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2012 | By David C. Nichols
It's hard to imagine a more peculiar mix of canny and canned than “The Addams Family,” which opened Tuesday at the Pantages Theatre. Marshall Brickman, Rick Elice and Andrew Lippa's 2010 musical adaptation of Charles Addams' celebrated New Yorker cartoon clan stitches together shrewdly maneuvered, innately mismatched elements, and still causes audiences to lose their collective heads. This had already been the case throughout “Family's” trek from Chicago to Broadway, where original director-designers Phelim McDermott and Julian Crouch of “Shockheaded Peter” fame had given way to director Jerry Zaks.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"The Fry Chronicles -- An Autobiography" Stephen Fry The Overlook Press: 438 pp, $29.95 Actor, writer and British humor icon Stephen Fry would like you to know that he picks his nose and pees in the shower. He also can't stand the sight of his naked body. And in case you were wondering, he's a rotten dancer, a spaz on the athletic field and none too confident in the sack either. It takes a mighty big ego to flaunt these sorts of imperfections, and that's the paradox that makes "The Fry Chronicles" such a chatty delight.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2010
"My Name Is Khan," an unrated Indian movie, opens Friday in selected theaters but did not screen for critics. The review will appear online as soon as it is available.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
In "The Tall Man" a figure fitting that description is snatching the children of a remote Pacific Northwest town. Though the local nurse (Jessica Biel) had been skeptical of the legend up to that point, once he breaks into her home and takes her son she springs into action trying to get the boy back. What happens then is a maddening swirl of events widely open to interpretation: the nurse finds the Tall Man; the whole town is complicit in a conspiracy; the nurse is insane, or she's guilty.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
PARIS -- As Chloe continues to celebrate its 60-year anniversary with a collection of greatest hits arriving in stores soon, the French brand's current designer, Clare Waight Keller, showed her fall 2013 collection Sunday afternoon under a tent in the Tuileries Garden during Paris Fashion Week. The inspiration: Tough girls, night buses, dorm rooms, bike sheds, cold nights, bare legs and independent spirit, according to the show notes. The look:  Tomboy. Nubbly wool felt coat.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
Too many questions and not enough answers haunt the slow-going mystery "The Woman in the Fifth,"a thankless lead vehicle for Ethan Hawke who's left largely stranded by writer-director Pawel Pawlikowski's opaque adaptation of Douglas Kennedy's novel. Hawke stars as American writer Tom Ricks, a one-book wonder who arrives in Paris to reunite with his ex-wife, Nathalie (Delphine Chuillot), and their small daughter, Chloé (Julie Papillon). But complications instantly pile up: Nathalie blocks Tom from seeing Chloé, his money and belongings are stolen, Tom's dumpy hotel room comes complete with sinister proprietor (Samir Guesmi)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2012
Marilynne Robinson has never let the pressures of the publishing industry rush her to write her books. In fact, 23 years separate her first novel, "Housekeeping," from her novel "Gilead," which received the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Here's what our reviewer, Merle Rubin, wrote in T he Times in December 2004 about "Gilead," which presents the autobiography of an elderly pastor living in a small Iowa town: At a moment in cultural history dominated by the shallow, the superficial, the quick fix, Marilynne Robinson is a miraculous anomaly: a writer who thoughtfully, carefully and tenaciously explores some of the deepest questions confronting the human species.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
Ah, "Cougar Town." The title alone just makes your heart sing, doesn't it? It's right up there with the title of the reality show Jack Donaghy turned into a hit on "30 Rock," whose title, which referred to sexually active mothers, is so coarse we cannot print it here. Only that show was a joke and this is not. This is a real show whose main conceit is that having sex with a younger man is fun and exciting for women over 40. Crude stuff for a family newspaper, but despite the warm-and-fuzzy-celebrity cred that star Courteney Cox brings to it, some funny lines and good acting all around, "Cougar Town" is a crude show, built on jokes about oral sex and droopy breasts, a show in which words like "coochie" are used with regrettable abandon.
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