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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2010
"Letters to God," a PG-rated family movie, opens Friday in general release but did not screen for critics. The review will appear online at latimes.com/movies reviews as soon as it is available.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
Raising vital questions about female sexuality in the cyber age, "Sexy Baby" studies a trio of subjects, sometimes in excruciating detail. The result is a kind of "Three Ages of Woman, With Plastic Surgery," that veers between insight and hand-wringing. Directors Jill Bauer and Ronna Gradus aim to foster discussion, and toward that end they've made interesting choices to illustrate the mainstreaming of porn and the effect of the Internet on attitudes toward sex. They profile a 12-year-old Manhattanite, smart, privileged and virginal, as she spends endless hours shaping her racy Facebook image; a 22-year-old North Carolina schoolteacher who regards her upcoming labia reduction as a life-saving necessity; and a married 32-year-old former porn actress trying to start a family.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2012 | By David C. Nichols
It's hard to imagine a more peculiar mix of canny and canned than “The Addams Family,” which opened Tuesday at the Pantages Theatre. Marshall Brickman, Rick Elice and Andrew Lippa's 2010 musical adaptation of Charles Addams' celebrated New Yorker cartoon clan stitches together shrewdly maneuvered, innately mismatched elements, and still causes audiences to lose their collective heads. This had already been the case throughout “Family's” trek from Chicago to Broadway, where original director-designers Phelim McDermott and Julian Crouch of “Shockheaded Peter” fame had given way to director Jerry Zaks.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2010
"My Name Is Khan," an unrated Indian movie, opens Friday in selected theaters but did not screen for critics. The review will appear online as soon as it is available.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Marilyn Hagerty's review of the Olive Garden in Grand Forks, N.D., is hardly about the restaurant's “warm and comforting” chicken Alfredo or the “attractive” bar area -- it's the purest gauge of all that is America. That's if you believe the snarky legions who bashed the 85-year-old reviewer's piece last week and turned it viral, the diners who then defended it and the pundits who have since spun it into a touchstone for a feisty debate about the country's culture. Much has been made of Hagerty's March 7 evaluation of the chain restaurant for the Grand Forks Herald.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
PARIS -- As Chloe continues to celebrate its 60-year anniversary with a collection of greatest hits arriving in stores soon, the French brand's current designer, Clare Waight Keller, showed her fall 2013 collection Sunday afternoon under a tent in the Tuileries Garden during Paris Fashion Week. The inspiration: Tough girls, night buses, dorm rooms, bike sheds, cold nights, bare legs and independent spirit, according to the show notes. The look:  Tomboy. Nubbly wool felt coat.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
Ah, "Cougar Town." The title alone just makes your heart sing, doesn't it? It's right up there with the title of the reality show Jack Donaghy turned into a hit on "30 Rock," whose title, which referred to sexually active mothers, is so coarse we cannot print it here. Only that show was a joke and this is not. This is a real show whose main conceit is that having sex with a younger man is fun and exciting for women over 40. Crude stuff for a family newspaper, but despite the warm-and-fuzzy-celebrity cred that star Courteney Cox brings to it, some funny lines and good acting all around, "Cougar Town" is a crude show, built on jokes about oral sex and droopy breasts, a show in which words like "coochie" are used with regrettable abandon.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Robert Abele
The listless "Four Assassins" operates under the assumption that a mostly one-location movie (a hotel room) is instantly interesting if it's populated by a quartet of contract killers. Writer-director Stanley J. Orzel believes other things too: that a female assassin (Mercedes Renard) would break down in tears over an ex-boyfriend in front of her icemen colleagues; that people are more alluring if they talk in clichés ("I was never afraid of death," "You still don't get it, do you?"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The involving, thematically rich "Terraferma," directed by Emanuele Crialese from a timely - yet also quite timeless - script he wrote with Vittorio Moroni, is set on a remote Sicilian island whose summer tourist trade has become more lucrative than its longtime, now-dwindling fishing business. However, because of its location, the isle is also a magnet for illegal African immigrants escaping to Europe. One day at sea, the aging Ernesto (Mimmo Cuticchio), a tradition-bound, lifelong fisherman, and his 20-year-old grandson Filippo (Filippo Pucillo)
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