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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"The Fry Chronicles -- An Autobiography" Stephen Fry The Overlook Press: 438 pp, $29.95 Actor, writer and British humor icon Stephen Fry would like you to know that he picks his nose and pees in the shower. He also can't stand the sight of his naked body. And in case you were wondering, he's a rotten dancer, a spaz on the athletic field and none too confident in the sack either. It takes a mighty big ego to flaunt these sorts of imperfections, and that's the paradox that makes "The Fry Chronicles" such a chatty delight.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2010
"Letters to God," a PG-rated family movie, opens Friday in general release but did not screen for critics. The review will appear online at latimes.com/movies reviews as soon as it is available.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Robert Abele
The unrepentant womanizer who falls hard for that elusive perfect woman and sees the error of his ways is hardly new territory for the romantic comedy. Yet rarely are the lead characters in those films as charmless as the one at the center of "6 Month Rule," written and directed by Blayne Weaver. Weaver also stars as Tyler, a smarmy love-em-and-leave-em photographer, petulant and schmuck-ish in equal measure. It's hard to believe that Tyler's grating, in-your-face seduction style - think a close-talking Christian Slater at his seamiest - would work on anyone, much less the fetching, seemingly level-headed art gallery employee (Natalie Morales)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2010
"My Name Is Khan," an unrated Indian movie, opens Friday in selected theaters but did not screen for critics. The review will appear online as soon as it is available.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
PARIS -- As Chloe continues to celebrate its 60-year anniversary with a collection of greatest hits arriving in stores soon, the French brand's current designer, Clare Waight Keller, showed her fall 2013 collection Sunday afternoon under a tent in the Tuileries Garden during Paris Fashion Week. The inspiration: Tough girls, night buses, dorm rooms, bike sheds, cold nights, bare legs and independent spirit, according to the show notes. The look:  Tomboy. Nubbly wool felt coat.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Inkoo Kang
"Speciesism: The Movie" feels like, and is, a product of youth. Director Mark Devries began making his awkwardly titled first-person documentary in college, and its tone is so painfully earnest it might well have begun as a class project. Heavily influenced by PETA's messaging and inflammatory tactics - the first half-hour is practically an ode to the animal rights organization - the film is more polarizing than persuasive. Devries initially models himself after Michael Moore, affecting a gee-whiz naiveté that's both grating and implausible.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
Ah, "Cougar Town." The title alone just makes your heart sing, doesn't it? It's right up there with the title of the reality show Jack Donaghy turned into a hit on "30 Rock," whose title, which referred to sexually active mothers, is so coarse we cannot print it here. Only that show was a joke and this is not. This is a real show whose main conceit is that having sex with a younger man is fun and exciting for women over 40. Crude stuff for a family newspaper, but despite the warm-and-fuzzy-celebrity cred that star Courteney Cox brings to it, some funny lines and good acting all around, "Cougar Town" is a crude show, built on jokes about oral sex and droopy breasts, a show in which words like "coochie" are used with regrettable abandon.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2012 | By David C. Nichols
It's hard to imagine a more peculiar mix of canny and canned than “The Addams Family,” which opened Tuesday at the Pantages Theatre. Marshall Brickman, Rick Elice and Andrew Lippa's 2010 musical adaptation of Charles Addams' celebrated New Yorker cartoon clan stitches together shrewdly maneuvered, innately mismatched elements, and still causes audiences to lose their collective heads. This had already been the case throughout “Family's” trek from Chicago to Broadway, where original director-designers Phelim McDermott and Julian Crouch of “Shockheaded Peter” fame had given way to director Jerry Zaks.
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