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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"The Fry Chronicles -- An Autobiography" Stephen Fry The Overlook Press: 438 pp, $29.95 Actor, writer and British humor icon Stephen Fry would like you to know that he picks his nose and pees in the shower. He also can't stand the sight of his naked body. And in case you were wondering, he's a rotten dancer, a spaz on the athletic field and none too confident in the sack either. It takes a mighty big ego to flaunt these sorts of imperfections, and that's the paradox that makes "The Fry Chronicles" such a chatty delight.
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NEWS
February 9, 2013 | By Booth Moore
NEW YORK -- With a lower-priced collection launching in Target stores Sunday, Prabal Gurung was the man of the hour this weekend at New York Fashion Week. Gurung showed his fall-winter 2013 mainline collection Saturday morning to a crowd that included pop singer Eve and the designer's own mother, Durga, who traveled from Nepal to see her youngest son's runway show for the first time. The look: Sexy warrior woman ready to take on the world like so many of Gurung's fans, First Lady Michelle Obama and actress Zoe Saldana included.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2010
"My Name Is Khan," an unrated Indian movie, opens Friday in selected theaters but did not screen for critics. The review will appear online as soon as it is available.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Marilyn Hagerty's review of the Olive Garden in Grand Forks, N.D., is hardly about the restaurant's “warm and comforting” chicken Alfredo or the “attractive” bar area -- it's the purest gauge of all that is America. That's if you believe the snarky legions who bashed the 85-year-old reviewer's piece last week and turned it viral, the diners who then defended it and the pundits who have since spun it into a touchstone for a feisty debate about the country's culture. Much has been made of Hagerty's March 7 evaluation of the chain restaurant for the Grand Forks Herald.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
Guy Fieri shot back at New York Times critic Pete Wells for a scathing review of his new Times Square restaurant, Guy's American Kitchen & Bar (written entirely in rhetorical questions). Some are even calling it the most brutal restaurant review ever. On today's "Today" show in an interview with Savannah Guthrie , the spiky-haired Food Network star said: "I thought it was ridiculous. I mean, I've read reviews - there's good and there's bad in the restaurant business, but that to me went so overboard, it really seemed like there was another agenda.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Robert Abele
The unrepentant womanizer who falls hard for that elusive perfect woman and sees the error of his ways is hardly new territory for the romantic comedy. Yet rarely are the lead characters in those films as charmless as the one at the center of "6 Month Rule," written and directed by Blayne Weaver. Weaver also stars as Tyler, a smarmy love-em-and-leave-em photographer, petulant and schmuck-ish in equal measure. It's hard to believe that Tyler's grating, in-your-face seduction style - think a close-talking Christian Slater at his seamiest - would work on anyone, much less the fetching, seemingly level-headed art gallery employee (Natalie Morales)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
Too many questions and not enough answers haunt the slow-going mystery "The Woman in the Fifth,"a thankless lead vehicle for Ethan Hawke who's left largely stranded by writer-director Pawel Pawlikowski's opaque adaptation of Douglas Kennedy's novel. Hawke stars as American writer Tom Ricks, a one-book wonder who arrives in Paris to reunite with his ex-wife, Nathalie (Delphine Chuillot), and their small daughter, Chloé (Julie Papillon). But complications instantly pile up: Nathalie blocks Tom from seeing Chloé, his money and belongings are stolen, Tom's dumpy hotel room comes complete with sinister proprietor (Samir Guesmi)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2012 | By David C. Nichols
It's hard to imagine a more peculiar mix of canny and canned than “The Addams Family,” which opened Tuesday at the Pantages Theatre. Marshall Brickman, Rick Elice and Andrew Lippa's 2010 musical adaptation of Charles Addams' celebrated New Yorker cartoon clan stitches together shrewdly maneuvered, innately mismatched elements, and still causes audiences to lose their collective heads. This had already been the case throughout “Family's” trek from Chicago to Broadway, where original director-designers Phelim McDermott and Julian Crouch of “Shockheaded Peter” fame had given way to director Jerry Zaks.
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