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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1994
Whoa. First Holocaust revisionism, and now Vietnam revisionism (Letters, April 17). Ted Turner is closer to history than reader Fred Landesman of Chatsworth. After World War II, once the Japanese were gone, the French invaded "French Indochina" to reclaim their colonial possessions. The Vietnamese eventually managed to kick them out--Dien Bien Phu (1954) was the decisive battle, their Tet. The United States then took over the French role, against the strongly expressed advice of De Gaulle.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 18, 2013 | By Bill Guttentag and Dan Sturman
This month 75 years ago, the people of Nanking, China's ancient capital city, were in the midst of one of the worst atrocities in history, the infamous Rape of Nanking. The truth of what actually happened is at the center of a bitter dispute between China and Japan that continues to play out in present-day relations. Many Chinese see Japan's election last month of ultraconservative nationalist Shinzo Abe as prime minister as just the latest in a string of insults. And it was recently reported that Japan is considering rolling back its 1993 apology regarding "comfort women," the thousands of women the Japanese army sexually enslaved during World War II. In 1937, the Japanese Imperial Army, captured Nanking on Dec. 13. No one knows the exact toll the Japanese soldiers exacted on its citizens, but a postwar Allied investigation put the numbers at more than 200,000 killed and at least 20,000 women and girls raped in the six weeks after the city fell.
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MAGAZINE
January 6, 2002
How dishonest was it for Stanford to leave the tarnished name of physicist William Shockley off its list of Nobel laureates in the full-page advertisement that appeared Dec. 2? More revisionism from that bastion of political correctness, "the farm." I have only one comment: Go Bears! Kennedy Gammage San Diego
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2009 | Ross King, King is the author of many books, including "Michelangelo and the Pope's Ceiling."
An endearing aspect of "The Da Vinci Code" phenomenon has been the creation of a new kind of action man. The boffin-as-hero, exemplified by Robert Langdon, marks a change from the traditional male adventurers of page and screen: the gun-toting muscleman, the caped superhero, the suave secret agent lethally accessorized with an exploding fountain pen. Guns and gadgets now have to make room for middle-aged professors more familiar with biblical symbolism...
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yet another Japanese Cabinet minister has suffered foot-in-mouth disease with remarks about World War II. "In an era in which more than 70% of Japanese have been born since 1940 and know nothing of the war, I wonder why Japan should keep rehashing the past and apologizing all the time," Yoshinobu Shimamura told reporters shortly after he was named education minister Tuesday night. "Whether Japan committed aggression or not is a matter of how you look at things.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1995 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tonight, four days after the 50th anniversary of Anne Frank's death--memorialized around the world last week by public readings of her eloquent diaries--South Coast Repertory weighs in with its own Holocaust commentary: a NewSCRipts presentation of Peter Sagal's "Denial." The Harvard-educated writer, 30, believes that the SCR Mainstage reading of his new play could not come at a better time or in a more appropriate place.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1985
The most astonishing thing in Calendar Dec. 23 was a letter from a Dave Grumman who said that Julian Lennon is more talented than John ever was. Grumman has to be the dumbest human being on the face of this earth. And Calendar comes in second for publishing such stupidity. ALLEN WILLIAMS Las Vegas
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1998
Mark Weber of the Institute for Historical Review would have us think that his organization is intellectually respectable (Letters, March 15). Don't believe it. The IHR is the same outfit that in 1979 offered $50,000 to anyone who "could prove that the Nazis operated gas chambers to exterminate Jews during World War II." When Mel Mermelstein provided the proof, the courts forced the IHR to pay up and to sign a letter of apology to Mermelstein. About three years ago, I became interested in the organization and requested information.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS
"My life was never dull," says Zelda Fitzgerald (Lisa Pelikan) in "Only a Broken String of Pearls," now at Theatre Geo in Hollywood. "I can't stand boredom." Indeed, in this rather calculated one-woman play Willard Simms captures practically every highlight from the crowded life of Zelda, fabled wife of novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald and one of the leading flappers of the 1920s.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1989 | IRWIN L. KELLER, IRWIN L. KELLNER is chief economist at Manufacturers Hanover in New York
How can you tell where you're going, if you don't know where you've been? This is the problem confronting economists with increasing frequency these days because of Washington's continuous revisions of its statistics. To be sure, revisions are a fact of life--and have been practically since the government began issuing data. However, those changes rarely were major and did not alter the direction of the figures as often as they seem to be doing this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2003 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
It was nearly 90 years ago, in the formative years of cinema, when a film crew from the then movie capital of Fort Lee, N.J., descended on a tiny, war-torn Mexican border town. They were there to capture the star power of revolutionary general Pancho Villa, shooting battle scenes that were choreographed with the full and richly compensated cooperation of the leader himself.
MAGAZINE
January 6, 2002
How dishonest was it for Stanford to leave the tarnished name of physicist William Shockley off its list of Nobel laureates in the full-page advertisement that appeared Dec. 2? More revisionism from that bastion of political correctness, "the farm." I have only one comment: Go Bears! Kennedy Gammage San Diego
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1998
Mark Weber of the Institute for Historical Review would have us think that his organization is intellectually respectable (Letters, March 15). Don't believe it. The IHR is the same outfit that in 1979 offered $50,000 to anyone who "could prove that the Nazis operated gas chambers to exterminate Jews during World War II." When Mel Mermelstein provided the proof, the courts forced the IHR to pay up and to sign a letter of apology to Mermelstein. About three years ago, I became interested in the organization and requested information.
NEWS
February 19, 1998 | DENIS HORGAN, THE HARTFORD COURANT
If memory is right, the Volkswagen Beetle got 650 miles per gallon, had an engine that could be fixed with a hairpin and was sturdy enough to drive through an arctic blizzard. But memory is not right. My Beetle was none of that, and yours probably wasn't either. Unfortunately, the sappy nostalgia corps has taken over, and we are required to put up with a bunch of malarkey about the Beetle because baby boomers used to have them and baby boomers now run everything and imagine that we care.
NEWS
March 26, 1997 | SILVIA CAVALLINI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Elsie Tu taught history here in the 1950s, she found herself apologizing often to her students, because, she notes, "I told them about the Opium Wars. I told them the facts--how Britain bought tea and paid with opium which got the Chinese hooked." Her version differed from the one in British textbooks then used in this colony, which taught that the mid-19th century wars were triggered by China's refusal to open its borders to foreign merchants and to let Britain keep its opium trade.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yet another Japanese Cabinet minister has suffered foot-in-mouth disease with remarks about World War II. "In an era in which more than 70% of Japanese have been born since 1940 and know nothing of the war, I wonder why Japan should keep rehashing the past and apologizing all the time," Yoshinobu Shimamura told reporters shortly after he was named education minister Tuesday night. "Whether Japan committed aggression or not is a matter of how you look at things.
NEWS
February 19, 1998 | DENIS HORGAN, THE HARTFORD COURANT
If memory is right, the Volkswagen Beetle got 650 miles per gallon, had an engine that could be fixed with a hairpin and was sturdy enough to drive through an arctic blizzard. But memory is not right. My Beetle was none of that, and yours probably wasn't either. Unfortunately, the sappy nostalgia corps has taken over, and we are required to put up with a bunch of malarkey about the Beetle because baby boomers used to have them and baby boomers now run everything and imagine that we care.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1995 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tonight, four days after the 50th anniversary of Anne Frank's death--memorialized around the world last week by public readings of her eloquent diaries--South Coast Repertory weighs in with its own Holocaust commentary: a NewSCRipts presentation of Peter Sagal's "Denial." The Harvard-educated writer, 30, believes that the SCR Mainstage reading of his new play could not come at a better time or in a more appropriate place.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS
"My life was never dull," says Zelda Fitzgerald (Lisa Pelikan) in "Only a Broken String of Pearls," now at Theatre Geo in Hollywood. "I can't stand boredom." Indeed, in this rather calculated one-woman play Willard Simms captures practically every highlight from the crowded life of Zelda, fabled wife of novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald and one of the leading flappers of the 1920s.
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