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Revolts Yugoslavia

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NEWS
July 4, 1998 | From Associated Press
With U.S. envoy Richard Holbrooke in Belgrade, the Yugoslav capital, trying to broker a cease-fire, Serbian forces on Friday broke a two-week rebel siege in the secessionist Kosovo province, freeing scores of Serbian villages and police officers. Serbian police entered Kijevo shortly after dawn, breaking the ethnic Albanian rebels' hold on the town and fulfilling what was believed to be Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's remaining goal in his latest crackdown on Kosovo.
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NEWS
August 5, 2001 | From Reuters
Serbia accused ethnic Albanian "terrorists" on Saturday of killing two of its police officers, and the U.N. refugee agency warned that the incident threatened to undermine fragile peace in southern Yugoslavia. Two Serbian police officers were killed and two others wounded in an attack late Friday in the village of Muhovac in the Presevo Valley region of southern Serbia, a government official said. Serbia is the dominant republic of Yugoslavia.
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NEWS
July 1, 1998 | Associated Press
Serbian security forces recaptured a coal mine that provides power to much of Kosovo in a withering offensive against rebels Tuesday that sent thousands of villagers streaming into the woods west of Pristina, the provincial capital. The heavy fighting in recent days has dimmed chances of a diplomatic settlement of the conflict in the southern Serbian province. Also Tuesday, U.S.
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
North Atlantic Treaty Organization peacekeepers increased patrols in a Kosovo village a day after nine Serbian children were injured in a grenade attack. The attack came just hours after an explosion in Pristina, the provincial capital, injured one woman and damaged several political offices. Flight Lt. Tim Serrell-Cooke, a spokesman for British peacekeepers, said three occupants of a vehicle hurled the grenades into a basketball court in the village of Crkvena Vodica, northwest of Pristina.
NEWS
October 2, 1997 | Associated Press
Serbian police used clubs and tear gas in this southern city in the province of Kosovo on Wednesday to break up the biggest show of dissent in years by Yugoslavia's increasingly fractious ethnic Albanian minority. In Belgrade, a second day of protests also ended in violence. The clashes were the second time in as many days that Serbian police have violently put down protests against President Slobodan Milosevic.
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
North Atlantic Treaty Organization peacekeepers increased patrols in a Kosovo village a day after nine Serbian children were injured in a grenade attack. The attack came just hours after an explosion in Pristina, the provincial capital, injured one woman and damaged several political offices. Flight Lt. Tim Serrell-Cooke, a spokesman for British peacekeepers, said three occupants of a vehicle hurled the grenades into a basketball court in the village of Crkvena Vodica, northwest of Pristina.
NEWS
August 5, 2001 | From Reuters
Serbia accused ethnic Albanian "terrorists" on Saturday of killing two of its police officers, and the U.N. refugee agency warned that the incident threatened to undermine fragile peace in southern Yugoslavia. Two Serbian police officers were killed and two others wounded in an attack late Friday in the village of Muhovac in the Presevo Valley region of southern Serbia, a government official said. Serbia is the dominant republic of Yugoslavia.
NEWS
July 12, 1998 | From Associated Press
Brushing aside international calls for a cease-fire, Serbian forces pounded ethnic Albanian rebels Saturday outside Kosovo's second-largest city. Hundreds of terrified civilians fled over twisting mountain roads to escape the fighting. Serbian troops began shelling the town of Lodja, just outside this western Kosovo city, about dawn Saturday. The attacks continued until midday.
NEWS
July 12, 1998 | From Associated Press
Brushing aside international calls for a cease-fire, Serbian forces pounded ethnic Albanian rebels Saturday outside Kosovo's second-largest city. Hundreds of terrified civilians fled over twisting mountain roads to escape the fighting. Serbian troops began shelling the town of Lodja, just outside this western Kosovo city, about dawn Saturday. The attacks continued until midday.
NEWS
July 4, 1998 | From Associated Press
With U.S. envoy Richard Holbrooke in Belgrade, the Yugoslav capital, trying to broker a cease-fire, Serbian forces on Friday broke a two-week rebel siege in the secessionist Kosovo province, freeing scores of Serbian villages and police officers. Serbian police entered Kijevo shortly after dawn, breaking the ethnic Albanian rebels' hold on the town and fulfilling what was believed to be Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's remaining goal in his latest crackdown on Kosovo.
NEWS
July 1, 1998 | Associated Press
Serbian security forces recaptured a coal mine that provides power to much of Kosovo in a withering offensive against rebels Tuesday that sent thousands of villagers streaming into the woods west of Pristina, the provincial capital. The heavy fighting in recent days has dimmed chances of a diplomatic settlement of the conflict in the southern Serbian province. Also Tuesday, U.S.
NEWS
October 2, 1997 | Associated Press
Serbian police used clubs and tear gas in this southern city in the province of Kosovo on Wednesday to break up the biggest show of dissent in years by Yugoslavia's increasingly fractious ethnic Albanian minority. In Belgrade, a second day of protests also ended in violence. The clashes were the second time in as many days that Serbian police have violently put down protests against President Slobodan Milosevic.
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