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Revolution Company

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BUSINESS
May 11, 2005 | From Washington Post
Franklin D. Raines, the former chairman and chief executive of mortgage giant Fannie Mae, is making a fresh start as an informal advisor to Revolution, a Washington-based holding company launched last month by former America Online Inc. Chairman Steve Case. Raines "is a friend and colleague" of Case's and has had an office at Revolution's headquarters since mid-April, said Malin Jennings, a company spokeswoman. Raines does not hold a title and is not getting a salary.
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BUSINESS
May 11, 2005 | From Washington Post
Franklin D. Raines, the former chairman and chief executive of mortgage giant Fannie Mae, is making a fresh start as an informal advisor to Revolution, a Washington-based holding company launched last month by former America Online Inc. Chairman Steve Case. Raines "is a friend and colleague" of Case's and has had an office at Revolution's headquarters since mid-April, said Malin Jennings, a company spokeswoman. Raines does not hold a title and is not getting a salary.
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BUSINESS
June 5, 2001 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Animal" could be more profitable than it would appear at first blush thanks to a unique arrangement the film's producer, Revolution Studios, has with its distributor and co-financier, Sony Pictures, according to Revolution executives. Of the $22 million it cost to make the movie, Sony put up only about $9 million.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2001 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Geoffrey Ammer has been installed as president of marketing at Sony Pictures Entertainment's Columbia TriStar Marketing Group. Assuming the post Sept. 4, Ammer will be second-in-command to the studio's worldwide marketing and distribution chief, Jeff Blake. The appointment would appear to be yet another signal that Revolution Studios chief Joe Roth is considering an opportunity to run Sony Pictures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2010 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
USC on Friday plans to announce two donations totaling $100 million that will fund a new institute for cancer research and a high-tech building for journalism studies. USC trustee and alumnus Ming Hsieh, whose Pasadena company, Cogent Inc., helped pioneer automated fingerprint identification, is giving $50 million. His donation will support nanomedical research ? a field that works at the atomic and molecular level ? to develop drugs and other therapies for cancer treatment. The other $50 million is from the Annenberg Foundation to USC's School for Communication & Journalism, which bears the Annenberg name because of significant previous donations to the school from the family's media business fortune.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1992 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, in their uniform of shimmery dark leggings and white T-shirts, they might have been vintage California girls working out in the rec room at an apartment complex near Burbank. Too hot to be on the tennis court where they usually practice.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2005 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
America Online co-founder Steve Case, who orchestrated his company's often-ridiculed acquisition of Time Warner Inc., resigned from the media giant's board Monday -- just as the era of digital entertainment he envisioned is taking shape. Case's departure comes as AOL's stature within Time Warner has grown. Once a weight around the company's neck, AOL is now seen as crucial to delivering Time Warner's vast array of content, and rivals such as Microsoft Corp. and Google Inc.
OPINION
November 28, 2003 | Nick Schulz, Nick Schulz is the editor of TechCentralStation.com.
Earlier this year, an important article in the Harvard Business Review rocked Silicon Valley and information technology -- IT -- circles. Its author, the business writer and consultant Nicholas Carr, made a bold, Olympian pronouncement: "IT Doesn't Matter." Carr argued that IT had become so ubiquitous it should be thought of as a commodity, like electricity: Everyone used it. As such, acquiring faster-better-cheaper technology wasn't going to help American businesses all that much.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he's at work in his research lab, engineer Takashi Sumita makes do with a personal computer made by NEC Corp. that is maddeningly slow and hard on the eyes. Since NEC has more than half the Japanese market for PCs, "the company feels it's safest," he says. At home, Sumita turns on his powerful IBM-compatible Packard Bell machine. Using American engineering software he bought from a mail order company, he speeds through complex calculations, enjoying the crisp, color images on the screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, regaining a sense of balance was the big issue in Joe Reineke's life. For two years, the veteran alterna-rocker and his band, Alien Crime Syndicate, had worked to perfect an album. Reineke, the singer-songwriter-guitarist, was sure they had something that radio stations would want to play and that lots of rock fans would want to hear. No sooner had they finished the album than the band was in danger of being finished, period.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2002 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and CHRISTINE FREY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Roy L. Olofson was an "old-economy" stalwart amid the bustling salesmen and "new-economy" believers that built Global Crossing Ltd. into one of the darlings of the technology revolution. The company was created around an ambitious plan to build a global telecommunications network. Its chief executive, Gary Winnick, proclaimed its technology plan "the future face of communications."
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