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Revolution Studios

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BUSINESS
November 28, 2000
* Walt Disney Co. marketing executive Geoffrey Ammer is leaving the company to join Revolution Studios, the production company founded by former Disney studio chief Joe Roth. Ammer will oversee marketing and distribution by Sony Pictures when it releases Revolution films under the distribution agreement between the two companies. He also will work on the company's online marketing.
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BUSINESS
March 11, 2010 | By Claudia Eller
Joe Roth was once Hollywood's golden boy. As a scrappy producer in the 1980s, he co-founded the independent movie company behind such low-budget hits as "Major League" and "Young Guns," then went on to run two major studios -- 20th Century Fox and Disney -- before leaving corporate life in 2000 to launch lavishly financed Revolution Studios, which employed 55 people. But after more than two decades of good fortune, his star turn ended when Revolution produced more flops than hits and went under after seven years.
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BUSINESS
August 8, 2000 | Bob Howard
Revolution Studios, a new film production company founded by former Walt Disney Studios chairman Joe Roth, signed a seven-year, $24-million lease for 61,000 square feet of space in a building now under construction at Hines Interests' Lantana Center office project in Santa Monica. The company expects to move into the new building in April, according to brokers from Julien J. Studley Inc. who represented Revolution in lease negotiations.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2006 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
WHEN Brad Grey got on the phone Friday, the chairman of Paramount Pictures had a pretty good idea what I was going to ask. Did Gail Berman, his embattled production chief, still have his backing? "Gail has my full confidence and support," he said. "Our plan is for our films to speak for themselves instead of being swayed by the Hollywood rumor mill."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2005 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
Things are starting to "Come Together" for "All You Need Is Love." Revolution Studios' $50-million romantic musical directed by Julie Taymor ("Frida"), which begins shooting Sept. 7 in New York, has just licensed the rights to about 30 classic Beatles songs. It won't be John, Paul, George and Ringo belting out their original hits, like "I Want to Hold Your Hand" or "Let It Be," since the price tag would have been astronomical.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2004
Sequel: Revolution Studios has committed to making "Hellboy II," with comic-book creator Mike Mignola developing the story with "Hellboy" writer-director Guillermo del Toro. Revival: Natasha Richardson will star as Blanche du Bois in a revival of Tennessee Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire" at the Roundabout Theatre Company's Studio 54 in New York next spring. Time chief: Bob Safian, managing editor of Money magazine since 1998, was named executive editor of Time magazine.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2005 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Veteran Hollywood deal maker Rob Moore was named Thursday as Paramount Pictures' top business executive as the revamping of the venerable Hollywood studio continues. In taking the job as president of worldwide marketing, distribution and operations, Moore relinquishes his partnership in Revolution Studios, the 5-year-old movie company founded by Joe Roth, former film chief at Walt Disney Co. and 20th Century Fox. Moore becomes the second of Revolution's four original partners to leave this year.
NATIONAL
February 29, 2004 | Rachel Abramowitz and John Horn, Times Staff Writers
Backstage at the Kodak Theatre three days before the Academy Awards, Oscar producer Joe Roth is swimming in Hollywood royalty. Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg have just finished rehearsing their speeches. Renee Zellweger waits for her run-through in the green room. At this very moment, Roth's as popular as anyone in show business could ever be. You would never know he needs a hit.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2003 | Michael Cieply and Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writers
Joe Roth suspected eight months ago that his Revolution Studios was in for a rough ride this spring and summer. In a hurry to make its mark, the young company had committed nearly $350 million to a cluster of movies that included two from filmmakers Ron Shelton and Martin Brest. Each would write, produce and direct his own picture -- and enjoy the prerogative of final cut, depriving Revolution of creative control over their work.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2001 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Animal" could be more profitable than it would appear at first blush thanks to a unique arrangement the film's producer, Revolution Studios, has with its distributor and co-financier, Sony Pictures, according to Revolution executives. Of the $22 million it cost to make the movie, Sony put up only about $9 million.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2005 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Veteran Hollywood deal maker Rob Moore was named Thursday as Paramount Pictures' top business executive as the revamping of the venerable Hollywood studio continues. In taking the job as president of worldwide marketing, distribution and operations, Moore relinquishes his partnership in Revolution Studios, the 5-year-old movie company founded by Joe Roth, former film chief at Walt Disney Co. and 20th Century Fox. Moore becomes the second of Revolution's four original partners to leave this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2005 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
Things are starting to "Come Together" for "All You Need Is Love." Revolution Studios' $50-million romantic musical directed by Julie Taymor ("Frida"), which begins shooting Sept. 7 in New York, has just licensed the rights to about 30 classic Beatles songs. It won't be John, Paul, George and Ringo belting out their original hits, like "I Want to Hold Your Hand" or "Let It Be," since the price tag would have been astronomical.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2004 | Claudia Eller and Michael Cieply, Times Staff Writers
Joe Roth is down to two hours' sleep a night. Movie previews and marketing meetings at his Revolution Studios are squeezed into Sundays to fit his schedule. The rest of Roth's week, nights included, belong to directing the comedy "Christmas With the Kranks" starring Tim Allen and Jamie Lee Curtis. On top of that, he would love to be asked to produce next year's Oscars, as he did for the show in February.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2004
Sequel: Revolution Studios has committed to making "Hellboy II," with comic-book creator Mike Mignola developing the story with "Hellboy" writer-director Guillermo del Toro. Revival: Natasha Richardson will star as Blanche du Bois in a revival of Tennessee Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire" at the Roundabout Theatre Company's Studio 54 in New York next spring. Time chief: Bob Safian, managing editor of Money magazine since 1998, was named executive editor of Time magazine.
NATIONAL
February 29, 2004 | Rachel Abramowitz and John Horn, Times Staff Writers
Backstage at the Kodak Theatre three days before the Academy Awards, Oscar producer Joe Roth is swimming in Hollywood royalty. Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg have just finished rehearsing their speeches. Renee Zellweger waits for her run-through in the green room. At this very moment, Roth's as popular as anyone in show business could ever be. You would never know he needs a hit.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2003 | Michael Cieply and Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writers
Joe Roth suspected eight months ago that his Revolution Studios was in for a rough ride this spring and summer. In a hurry to make its mark, the young company had committed nearly $350 million to a cluster of movies that included two from filmmakers Ron Shelton and Martin Brest. Each would write, produce and direct his own picture -- and enjoy the prerogative of final cut, depriving Revolution of creative control over their work.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2010 | By Claudia Eller
Joe Roth was once Hollywood's golden boy. As a scrappy producer in the 1980s, he co-founded the independent movie company behind such low-budget hits as "Major League" and "Young Guns," then went on to run two major studios -- 20th Century Fox and Disney -- before leaving corporate life in 2000 to launch lavishly financed Revolution Studios, which employed 55 people. But after more than two decades of good fortune, his star turn ended when Revolution produced more flops than hits and went under after seven years.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2003 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Sony Pictures isn't quite ready to swear off "Charlie's Angels 3." Nor has Universal Pictures definitely decided to abandon its car chase series "The Fast and the Furious." But corporate Hollywood, stung by a run of huge budgets and softer-than-hoped-for showings in its peak summer season, has begun a palpable shift in attitude regarding yesterday's sure thing: the sequel.
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