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January 12, 1991 | STAN YARBRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The government has succeeded in pacifying the notorious Medellin cocaine cartel, but recent attacks by a different public enemy have shattered fragile hopes for an end to terrorism in Colombia. Leftist guerrillas of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia are replacing Medellin traffickers as the country's most lethal armed group as they continue an offensive that has killed 41 police officers and soldiers so far this month.
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WORLD
October 15, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
BOGOTA, Colombia - Among the many thorny issues to be hammered out in peace talks beginning Wednesday in Oslo between Colombia's government and the country's largest rebel group is what sort of post-conflict political role will be afforded to the insurgents. Guaranteeing a political voice for the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, is one of the five main issues in the talks, which are to begin in the Norwegian capital and then move to Havana. The other points to be negotiated are agrarian reform, victims' rights, an end to the rebels' alleged drug trafficking and logistics for stopping the conflict.
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NEWS
February 7, 1991 | STAN YARBRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leftist guerrillas excluded from this week's first meetings to rewrite the Colombian constitution managed, nevertheless, to raise their bloody objection to the assembly. Stepped-up actions by two guerrilla groups have resulted in the deaths of at least 47 people since the leftist attacks began Monday, hours before the opening of the constitutional assembly.
WORLD
November 27, 2011 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
Four military hostages who had been held for as long as 14 years were executed by Colombian rebels during a rescue attempt by the army in a southern jungle, Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzon said Saturday. He said three of the hostages were shot in the head and the other was shot in the back by fighters with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known by its Spanish initials, FARC. One of the dead was a soldier; the other three were members of the national police. "We regret profoundly that these victims were killed in cold blood, in a state of absolute defenselessness," Pinzon said at a hastily called news conference in Bogota, the Colombian capital.
WORLD
November 6, 2011 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
Although Colombia's armed forces delivered a serious blow to the country's largest rebel force with the killing of its leader, analysts Saturday held out little hope for a peace initiative by the decimated but still potent leftist insurgent group. The 63-year-old rebel leader, who went by the alias Alfonso Cano, was killed Friday in a military operation in southwestern Colombia. At a news conference Saturday, President Juan Manuel Santos called on the rebels to lay down their arms.
WORLD
October 15, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
BOGOTA, Colombia - Among the many thorny issues to be hammered out in peace talks beginning Wednesday in Oslo between Colombia's government and the country's largest rebel group is what sort of post-conflict political role will be afforded to the insurgents. Guaranteeing a political voice for the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, is one of the five main issues in the talks, which are to begin in the Norwegian capital and then move to Havana. The other points to be negotiated are agrarian reform, victims' rights, an end to the rebels' alleged drug trafficking and logistics for stopping the conflict.
WORLD
November 27, 2011 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
Four military hostages who had been held for as long as 14 years were executed by Colombian rebels during a rescue attempt by the army in a southern jungle, Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzon said Saturday. He said three of the hostages were shot in the head and the other was shot in the back by fighters with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known by its Spanish initials, FARC. One of the dead was a soldier; the other three were members of the national police. "We regret profoundly that these victims were killed in cold blood, in a state of absolute defenselessness," Pinzon said at a hastily called news conference in Bogota, the Colombian capital.
WORLD
September 23, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Suspected rebels ambushed and killed 10 police officers on a remote highway near La Cruz, 290 miles southwest of Bogota. Narino state Lt. Gov. Fabio Trujillo said either the National Liberation Army or the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia was likely to blame.
WORLD
October 5, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A bomb packed inside a pickup truck and apparently meant to target government forces killed two children and a man, all family members, Colombian police said. The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia probably planted the bomb, said police Col. Uriel Toro.
WORLD
August 26, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Rebels killed 13 coca harvesters and their cook, the latest victims in the guerrillas' feud with paramilitary gangs over control of Colombia's lucrative cocaine trade, authorities said. Rebels of the leftist Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia gunned down Flor Maria Gutierrez and 13 men as she was serving them lunch Wednesday on a farm near Puerto Valdivia, the officials said.
WORLD
November 6, 2011 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
Although Colombia's armed forces delivered a serious blow to the country's largest rebel force with the killing of its leader, analysts Saturday held out little hope for a peace initiative by the decimated but still potent leftist insurgent group. The 63-year-old rebel leader, who went by the alias Alfonso Cano, was killed Friday in a military operation in southwestern Colombia. At a news conference Saturday, President Juan Manuel Santos called on the rebels to lay down their arms.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | STAN YARBRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leftist guerrillas excluded from this week's first meetings to rewrite the Colombian constitution managed, nevertheless, to raise their bloody objection to the assembly. Stepped-up actions by two guerrilla groups have resulted in the deaths of at least 47 people since the leftist attacks began Monday, hours before the opening of the constitutional assembly.
NEWS
January 12, 1991 | STAN YARBRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The government has succeeded in pacifying the notorious Medellin cocaine cartel, but recent attacks by a different public enemy have shattered fragile hopes for an end to terrorism in Colombia. Leftist guerrillas of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia are replacing Medellin traffickers as the country's most lethal armed group as they continue an offensive that has killed 41 police officers and soldiers so far this month.
WORLD
July 23, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Colombian Marxist rebels have freed a soldier captured a month ago, in what they called a peace gesture aimed at paving the way toward a possible exchange of about 70 hostages for jailed guerrillas. The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia said in an e-mail that they had released Duverney Orozco, captured during an assault on the jungle village of Teteye on June 25, when rebels killed 25 soldiers. The army confirmed his release.
WORLD
January 27, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Colombian prison guards killed seven inmates after jailed Marxist rebels blew a hole in a wall with smuggled explosives, the national prison service said. Twenty inmates fled Picalena prison in Ibague, central Colombia, Tuesday night after the rebels inside the jail blasted the hole and Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia comrades outside provided cover with assault rifles. Guards fired back, killing seven inmates and wounding four, the prison authorities said.
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