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Revolutionary Change

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1990 | RAY LOYND
Nicaraguan playwright Alan Bolt was surprised when Harold Pinter unexpectedly arrived at his farm one day. The farm is the home of a radical agricultural and theatrical cooperative run by Bolt in the mountains near Matagalpa, and it's a magical place, according to visitors. Many of them include movie stars and artists, and they make the two-hour drive from Managua almost as if they are on a political pilgrimage.
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OPINION
October 30, 2011
Things are looking up for future females born into the British royal family. After centuries during which first-born males succeeded to the throne ahead of their elder sisters, the British Commonwealth countries that recognize the monarch as head of state agreed Friday to abolish the practice of primogeniture. When it comes to inheriting the throne, birth order will now trump gender. Girls rule (when they're older than their brothers). For the rest of the Western world this development may not seem to be on the cutting edge of equal rights.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2004 | Peter Nicholas, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said Tuesday that he wanted a "revolutionary kind of change" in state government and might be forced to bypass the Legislature and take to the ballot a plan to streamline what he called a dated and creaky bureaucracy. But he said there was no urgency to act on his proposal to make the California Legislature part-time. On the day a statewide opinion poll showed public opposition to the idea, he said it might require considerable study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2004 | Peter Nicholas, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said Tuesday that he wanted a "revolutionary kind of change" in state government and might be forced to bypass the Legislature and take to the ballot a plan to streamline what he called a dated and creaky bureaucracy. But he said there was no urgency to act on his proposal to make the California Legislature part-time. On the day a statewide opinion poll showed public opposition to the idea, he said it might require considerable study.
NEWS
April 14, 2002 | JURA KONCIUS, WASHINGTON POST
When visitors to Mount Vernon started asking if the faded, tattered red toile bed hangings in the Downstairs Bedroom were the originals from Martha and George Washington's days, curators agreed it was time for some gentle refurbishment. So this year, fabrics and carpeting in four rooms at the mansion are undergoing a $100,000 make-over. Changing anything at a house as historic as Mount Vernon can take years of painstaking research and documentation--as well as fund-raising.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1993
Moving to end the taboo on women serving in combat units, Defense Secretary Les Aspin has told the armed services to begin immediately training women to fly fighters, bombers and attack helicopters, and is preparing to ask Congress to lift the ban that prevents women from serving aboard many warships. This is a giant and overdue if inevitably controversial step toward making the uniformed services truly gender-neutral.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1990 | WALTER LAQUEUR, Walter Laqueur is chairman of the Research Council of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, and author of the forthcoming "Stalin: The Glasnost Revelations " (Scribners). He recently returned from the Soviet Union.
Perhaps the most striking feature of today's political scene in the Soviet Union is the absence of the young generation. Speaker after speaker at the recent Communist Party Congress tended to be Russian, male--and well over 40. The average age of the opposition seemed not much younger. Indeed, a Soviet writer described the Moscow radical movement as "the revolution of the old-age pensioners."
NEWS
January 17, 1995 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Haitian military, the most powerful symbol and agent of the brutality and corruption that marked life here for half a century, is no more. The army is an object of public ridicule and the victim of a man it thought it had destroyed. In what many Haitian political analysts see as the most revolutionary change in Haitian life since the end of a U.S. military occupation more than 60 years ago, President Jean-Bertrand Aristide has erased the army as an institution and a factor in Haitian life.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood won't have the Roger of "Roger and Me" to kick around any more. Roger B. Smith, General Motors' controversial chairman who has unwittingly become best known to the general public as the absent target of Michael Moore's savagely satirical film "Roger and Me," announced Tuesday that he will turn over control of the world's largest industrial company to Robert C. Stempel.
OPINION
October 30, 2011
Things are looking up for future females born into the British royal family. After centuries during which first-born males succeeded to the throne ahead of their elder sisters, the British Commonwealth countries that recognize the monarch as head of state agreed Friday to abolish the practice of primogeniture. When it comes to inheriting the throne, birth order will now trump gender. Girls rule (when they're older than their brothers). For the rest of the Western world this development may not seem to be on the cutting edge of equal rights.
NEWS
April 14, 2002 | JURA KONCIUS, WASHINGTON POST
When visitors to Mount Vernon started asking if the faded, tattered red toile bed hangings in the Downstairs Bedroom were the originals from Martha and George Washington's days, curators agreed it was time for some gentle refurbishment. So this year, fabrics and carpeting in four rooms at the mansion are undergoing a $100,000 make-over. Changing anything at a house as historic as Mount Vernon can take years of painstaking research and documentation--as well as fund-raising.
NEWS
January 17, 1995 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Haitian military, the most powerful symbol and agent of the brutality and corruption that marked life here for half a century, is no more. The army is an object of public ridicule and the victim of a man it thought it had destroyed. In what many Haitian political analysts see as the most revolutionary change in Haitian life since the end of a U.S. military occupation more than 60 years ago, President Jean-Bertrand Aristide has erased the army as an institution and a factor in Haitian life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1993
Moving to end the taboo on women serving in combat units, Defense Secretary Les Aspin has told the armed services to begin immediately training women to fly fighters, bombers and attack helicopters, and is preparing to ask Congress to lift the ban that prevents women from serving aboard many warships. This is a giant and overdue if inevitably controversial step toward making the uniformed services truly gender-neutral.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1990 | WALTER LAQUEUR, Walter Laqueur is chairman of the Research Council of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, and author of the forthcoming "Stalin: The Glasnost Revelations " (Scribners). He recently returned from the Soviet Union.
Perhaps the most striking feature of today's political scene in the Soviet Union is the absence of the young generation. Speaker after speaker at the recent Communist Party Congress tended to be Russian, male--and well over 40. The average age of the opposition seemed not much younger. Indeed, a Soviet writer described the Moscow radical movement as "the revolution of the old-age pensioners."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1990 | RAY LOYND
Nicaraguan playwright Alan Bolt was surprised when Harold Pinter unexpectedly arrived at his farm one day. The farm is the home of a radical agricultural and theatrical cooperative run by Bolt in the mountains near Matagalpa, and it's a magical place, according to visitors. Many of them include movie stars and artists, and they make the two-hour drive from Managua almost as if they are on a political pilgrimage.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood won't have the Roger of "Roger and Me" to kick around any more. Roger B. Smith, General Motors' controversial chairman who has unwittingly become best known to the general public as the absent target of Michael Moore's savagely satirical film "Roger and Me," announced Tuesday that he will turn over control of the world's largest industrial company to Robert C. Stempel.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2011 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
It was his green tongue that helped give away Jimmy Candido Flores when police arrived at the fatal accident scene near Chico. Flores had run off the road and killed a jogger, Carrie Jean Holliman, a 56-year-old Chico elementary school teacher. California Highway Patrol officers thought he might be impaired and conducted a sobriety examination. Flores' tongue had a green coat typical of heavy marijuana users and a later test showed he had pot, as well as other drugs, in his blood.
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