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Revolutionary United Front

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NEWS
May 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Ninety-three exhausted Zambian and Kenyan U.N. peacekeepers, held hostage for two weeks in the bush by rebels in Sierra Leone, flew back to this government-controlled capital late Tuesday from neighboring Liberia. But there was no sign of progress in efforts to secure the release of about 350 U.N. troops of many nationalities still apparently being held by the Revolutionary United Front.
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WORLD
April 27, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon and Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The litany of abuses was chilling: mass murder, rape, sexual slavery. Forcing children to fight. Chopping off victims' limbs. Former Liberian President Charles Taylor's conviction Thursday by an international tribunal in the Netherlands on charges of abetting such war crimes in the West African country of Sierra Leone sent a powerful message to other warlords that they will eventually face justice, human rights activists and prosecutors say. But it also highlights what can be a wrenching tension between pursuing justice or peace first in some of the world's most violent, chaotic corners.
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NEWS
May 6, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebels in the West African nation of Sierra Leone are holding more than 300 U.N. troops and military observers hostage, officials said Friday, creating a grave crisis for the world body's biggest peacekeeping operation. There were reports that rebels of the Revolutionary United Front, or RUF, were using captured U.N. armored personnel carriers in military maneuvers. Gen. Vijay Kumar Jetley of India--commander of the U.N.'
NEWS
May 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Ninety-three exhausted Zambian and Kenyan U.N. peacekeepers, held hostage for two weeks in the bush by rebels in Sierra Leone, flew back to this government-controlled capital late Tuesday from neighboring Liberia. But there was no sign of progress in efforts to secure the release of about 350 U.N. troops of many nationalities still apparently being held by the Revolutionary United Front.
WORLD
April 27, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon and Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The litany of abuses was chilling: mass murder, rape, sexual slavery. Forcing children to fight. Chopping off victims' limbs. Former Liberian President Charles Taylor's conviction Thursday by an international tribunal in the Netherlands on charges of abetting such war crimes in the West African country of Sierra Leone sent a powerful message to other warlords that they will eventually face justice, human rights activists and prosecutors say. But it also highlights what can be a wrenching tension between pursuing justice or peace first in some of the world's most violent, chaotic corners.
NEWS
August 30, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Thirty-one civilians and seven soldiers were killed in a rebel ambush in eastern Sierra Leone, the military said, raising fears of renewed fighting after months of relative calm. It said fighters of the Revolutionary United Front attacked a government position Monday in Foindu, about 200 miles east of Freetown, the capital.
NEWS
February 4, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A boat full of refugees fleeing fighting in Sierra Leone's capital, Freetown, hit a rock near the border with neighboring Guinea-Bissau and sank Monday, killing 50 people, officials said. Thousands of refugees have fled Freetown since fighting began there in January. As many as 3,000 people have died in fighting nationwide since December.
NEWS
January 13, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Detained rebel leader Foday Sankoh was flown to neighboring Guinea, where U.N. sources said he had long talks with West African mediators and Sierra Leone officials about a cease-fire after a week of fierce fighting in Sierra Leone's capital, Freetown. U.N. sources said the talks were adjourned after three hours with no news of an agreement between Sankoh's Revolutionary United Front and a Nigerian-led regional force backing President Ahmad Tejan Kabbah's government.
NEWS
January 9, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Rebels in Sierra Leone who have seized part of Freetown, the capital, rejected the government's offer of a truce. Instead, the rebels hardened their political demands and vowed to continue their military offensive. Fighting in Freetown continued for a third day, according to journalists and international aid agency workers in the war-torn nation. The rebel forces of the Revolutionary United Front are fighting to unseat President Ahmad Tejan Kabbah, who was ousted in a May 1997 military coup.
WORLD
May 12, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Clashes erupted in Freetown, Sierra Leone's capital, between former rebels and supporters of President Ahmad Tejan Kabbah ahead of a Tuesday election that follows a decade of war. Police said some Kabbah supporters might have been killed in the violence, which followed scuffles near the office of the Revolutionary United Front Party. Kabbah's supporters choked the streets--drumming, dancing, singing and waving cans of beer and the palm frond symbol of the ruling Sierra Leone People's Party.
NEWS
May 6, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebels in the West African nation of Sierra Leone are holding more than 300 U.N. troops and military observers hostage, officials said Friday, creating a grave crisis for the world body's biggest peacekeeping operation. There were reports that rebels of the Revolutionary United Front, or RUF, were using captured U.N. armored personnel carriers in military maneuvers. Gen. Vijay Kumar Jetley of India--commander of the U.N.'
NEWS
May 3, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Rebels seized 50 U.N. workers as the West African intervention force that defended the government during eight years of bloody civil war completed its pullout from Sierra Leone, U.N. officials said. Revolutionary United Front rebels captured the U.N. military observers and peacekeepers--mainly Indians, Kenyans and Nigerians--in three cities, U.N. officials said. U.N. force commander Maj. Gen. Vijay Kumar Jetley said the rebels promised to free the peacekeepers today. In New York, the U.N.
NEWS
January 22, 1995 | Reuters
Sierra Leone rebels seized two Britons in an attack on a U.S.-owned mining compound Friday, two days after they attacked a Swiss-owned mine and abducted five Europeans. Nord Resources Corp., which owns Sierra Rutile Ltd., said a Sierra Leonean worker had also been seized. The British Foreign Office named the Britons as Peter White and Andrew Young. Six Britons have been reported missing in the former British colony since November.
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