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Revolutionary War

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
RICHMOND, Va. - Seth Numrich can't quite get a straight answer. In character as Ben Tallmadge, the leader of a group of Revolutionary War spies known as the Culper Ring and a central character in the new AMC drama "Turn," he is interrogating a ragged-looking background player whose toes have been painted black to mimic frostbite. The unfortunate man is a scout who has failed to relay crucial information to Tallmadge and fellow spy Caleb Brewster (Daniel Henshall), who are working on behalf of Gen. George Washington, and his explanation for the botched mission is suspicious at best: He claims he fell in the river because he was blinded by fog. "It's very difficult to gather intelligence when we possess so little of it," says a frustrated Tallmadge, exiting a makeshift hospital tent that, on camera, appears situated in a dense thicket of woods but is actually inside a giant converted warehouse.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Slowly they return, the clean-shaven, square-jawed heroes of yore, displaced for so many years now by their darker, more intricately conflicted brethren - the detectives with one foot on either side of the law, the pill-popping acerbic doctors and philandering, power-mad family men. The broadcast networks pivoted first; the leads of shows like NBC's "Grimm," Fox's "Sleepy Hollow" and ABC's "Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. " are good guys through and through. Now AMC, the fledgling powerhouse that branded itself with the moral ambiguity of "Mad Men" and "Breaking Bad," and the bleak and ever-shifting convictions of "The Walking Dead," is entering the straight-up hero business.
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NEWS
July 1, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Just in time for the Fourth of July, a Revolutionary War cannon was hauled from the depths of Lake Champlain. Sens. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) and Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.) joined historians to watch a crane retrieve the 800-pound cannon found two years ago 50 feet underwater. Historians believe the cannon burst during the Battle of Valcour Island on Oct. 11, 1776, when 15 vessels commanded by Benedict Arnold were attacked by the British near what's now Plattsburgh, N.Y.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
RICHMOND, Va. - Seth Numrich can't quite get a straight answer. In character as Ben Tallmadge, the leader of a group of Revolutionary War spies known as the Culper Ring and a central character in the new AMC drama "Turn," he is interrogating a ragged-looking background player whose toes have been painted black to mimic frostbite. The unfortunate man is a scout who has failed to relay crucial information to Tallmadge and fellow spy Caleb Brewster (Daniel Henshall), who are working on behalf of Gen. George Washington, and his explanation for the botched mission is suspicious at best: He claims he fell in the river because he was blinded by fog. "It's very difficult to gather intelligence when we possess so little of it," says a frustrated Tallmadge, exiting a makeshift hospital tent that, on camera, appears situated in a dense thicket of woods but is actually inside a giant converted warehouse.
NEWS
April 16, 2000 | Associated Press
Colonial minutemen drove British redcoats from the Old North Bridge on Saturday--just as they did 225 years ago when the "shot heard 'round the world" opened the Revolutionary War. Thousands of war re-enactors from across the United States, Canada and England gathered in Lexington and Concord, and as many as 200,000 spectators were expected to watch the weekend reenactments, including Paul Revere's ride and the legendary battle at the bridge in Concord.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2006 | From Times staff reports
The Board of Supervisors on Tuesday postponed deciding whether an Oak Glen apple farm could continue its Revolutionary War reenactments whose musket fire and hundreds of visitors have incensed neighbors. Supervisors are scheduled to vote Aug. 22 whether Riley's Farm can build 30 structures to accommodate 1,224 visitors during the day and 144 overnight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library near Simi Valley is sponsoring a Revolutionary War weekend today and Sunday. The event will include a glimpse into Colonial life through dance, metal casting, spinning, weaving and other crafts. The event runs from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. General admission to the museum and library is $5. The event is free for children 15 and younger. For more information, call (800) 410-8354.
TRAVEL
October 6, 2002 | Jane Engle
Revolutionary War buffs have a new place to visit, thanks to the Fort Montgomery State Historic Site, which opens today on the bluffs above the Hudson River four miles south of the West Point military academy. The 14-acre area has an interpretive trail linking the foundations of fortifications involved in a 1777 battle in which British forces overwhelmed the American defenders, killing 70 Americans. It is open daily through October and then will reopen April 15. Admission is free.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1995 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
We've forgotten how impossible and nearly suicidal the American Colonial revolt against the British crown really was, and television does almost nothing to revive the memory. Movies, plays, even novels have left the War for Independence behind like some ancient skirmish.
NATIONAL
July 5, 2007 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
President Bush equated the war in Iraq on Wednesday with the U.S. war for independence. Like those revolutionaries who "dropped their pitchforks and picked up their muskets to fight for liberty," Bush said, American soldiers were also fighting "a new and unprecedented war" to protect U.S. freedom. In a reprise of speeches he delivered throughout the 2006 congressional campaign, the president said the threat that emerged on Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
Dinesh D'Souza made a polemic-camouflaged-as-documentary into a hit a couple years back with “2016: Obama's America,” an anti-Obama film that went over big with the base and garnered $33 million in theaters. Can he do the same with a film that has the earmarks of a polemic-camouflaged-as-narrative feature?  Reuniting with "2016" producer Gerald Molen, D'Souza has directed “America,” a counterfactual history that imagines a world in which George Washington is killed in battle and America, thus, never exists.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
A resurrected Revolutionary War hero, a double-ax-wielding horseman (headless), ghost trees, Colonial witches, horned beasts, ancient priests, a sassy female cop and at least one Starbucks joke? Long before Tom Mison's fit and dashing Ichabod Crane got around to mentioning (oh yes, he did) the Four Horseman of the Apocalypse, I was hopelessly, hopefully hooked on "Sleepy Hollow," Fox's new literate if historically zany spook-fest of a police procedural. Too much going on in the pilot, you say?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
For years the stories of pain and patriotism, of loss and heroism, have been locked away in a storage facility in Washington, D.C. But now a massive collection of American wartime correspondence from the Revolutionary War to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is on the verge of finding a permanent home that will provide greater access for students, historians and the general public. Author and historian Andrew Carroll, who has gathered 90,000-plus wartime letters since 1998, has reached an agreement to donate the ever-growing collection to Chapman University in Orange County.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2010 | By Rinker Buck
The scenic village green of Litchfield has long symbolized the charms of Connecticut small-town life. Settled in 1721, it hosts tourists drawn by its Revolutionary War history: Litchfield served as a "safe town" for Continental forces seeking refuge while the British occupied New York City. But this fall, the celebrated tourist town of about 8,500 will receive publicity for quite a different reason: charges of religious discrimination. This summer, a federal judge ruled that sufficient evidence of "discrimination against Jewish people" may exist, warranting a trial over the Borough of Litchfield's denial of a Hasidic group's application to build a synagogue on the west end of Litchfield Green.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2010 | James Oliphant
John Murtha, the Democratic congressman from Pennsylvania and decorated former Marine whose fierce opposition to the Iraq war helped catalyze public sentiment against the conflict, died Monday. He was 77. Murtha died at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington, Va., surrounded by his family, his office announced. He had been hospitalized with complications from gallbladder surgery. "With the passing of Jack Murtha, America lost a great patriot," House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a statement about Murtha, who was an ally of the California congresswoman.
OPINION
October 5, 2009 | Israel Drazin, Israel Drazin is a retired Army brigadier general.
Deep in the Mojave National Preserve, 125 miles northeast of Los Angeles, an 8-foot-tall metal structure juts upward from a rocky outcrop. The structure is a Latin cross -- the preeminent symbol of Christianity -- that the National Park Service has boarded up with plywood pending a decision on its future by the U.S. Supreme Court. The case, known as Salazar vs. Buono and slated to be taken up by the court on Wednesday, is the culmination of a nine-year legal battle over whether the cross is a religious symbol or a secular "commemoration" of soldiers who died in World War I. Like many legal cases, this one has grown more complicated over the years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1994 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Fourth of July celebrants who want to look beyond fireworks can experience the Revolutionary War and the 1770s lifestyle when the Southern California Community of Colonial Arts sets up a "living history" encampment across from Knott's Berry Farm this weekend. History buffs from around the region will don period dress and demonstrate the tools and crafts that helped people survive this country's early years. Visitors can wander through the encampment free of charge from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2008 | Brett Zongker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON -- Most accounts of the Revolutionary War give the impression that America's independence was won by brave white men. Maurice Barboza wants to tell the rest of the story. He's trying to revive an effort to build the first monument on the National Mall honoring black Colonial soldiers. The project would recognize such people as Crispus Attucks, the first patriot killed in the Boston Massacre, and James Lafayette, a Virginia slave who risked his life to spy on the British and was granted freedom in return.
OPINION
May 30, 2009
Re "Why we fought," editorial, May 25 Thank you, thank you. The Memorial Day editorial makes me very proud of my L.A. Times. A shame that such a relative minute portion of people have the opportunity to read these profound -- and delusional -- reflections of past presidents. Can't compete with Susan Boyle, eh? Philip J. Hilow Sunland -- Your editorial is right about the U.S. fighting the Revolutionary War, War of 1812 and World War II. By contrast, World War I was a great blood bath.
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