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Revolving Door Productions

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The thing about revolving doors is that they let you in--and they also show you the way out. These days, though, Joel Beers and his partners are thinking of the name of their fledgling theater group--Revolving Door Productions--as meaning only one thing: In, not Out. When the group started rehearsals at downtown Fullerton's Teatro Cometa for their current show, "An Evening of One-Acts", it was just a visitor, subletting the small black box space from the Teatro Cometa company.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's easy to connect the cult luminaries playwright-director Joel Beers acknowledges in the program for his new play, "Indio," to the play itself. Sam Shepard, Raymond Berry, David Lynch, Lenny Bruce, Sal Paradise and Blind Boy Grunt make up the list of American fringe cool guys. The big man missing from the list, but whose presence is felt all over Beers' play about pathologies run amok in the California desert, is Quentin ("Reservoir Dogs") Tarantino.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's easy to connect the cult luminaries playwright-director Joel Beers acknowledges in the program for his new play, "Indio," to the play itself. Sam Shepard, Raymond Berry, David Lynch, Lenny Bruce, Sal Paradise and Blind Boy Grunt make up the list of American fringe cool guys. The big man missing from the list, but whose presence is felt all over Beers' play about pathologies run amok in the California desert, is Quentin ("Reservoir Dogs") Tarantino.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The thing about revolving doors is that they let you in--and they also show you the way out. These days, though, Joel Beers and his partners are thinking of the name of their fledgling theater group--Revolving Door Productions--as meaning only one thing: In, not Out. When the group started rehearsals at downtown Fullerton's Teatro Cometa for their current show, "An Evening of One-Acts", it was just a visitor, subletting the small black box space from the Teatro Cometa company.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1996 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Deconstructing a classic is a common directorial approach these days. Sometimes it works, and sometimes it doesn't. Why directors do it is easy to figure out: They're trying to look at the work through a new prism, hoping to find fresh tones and maybe a contemporary slant. Often, though the pieces shift around, the story itself remains intact--as in Steve Spehar's adaptation and staging of Sophocles' "Oedipus. King." for Revolving Door Productions at the Tribune Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1995 | T. H. McCULLOH
Revolving Door Productions is being outrageous again at its Tribune Theatre home base. This time it's called "Mind's I," an evening of short monologues and a couple of pieces that qualify as one-acts, all written and directed by Terry McNichol. Some of it works, but most of it is pointless, aimless and spiritless. The evening opens with a Host (Nicholas Boicourt Jr.) dressed in black and bound with rope to a chair. He appears to be having a problem with his mind and invites the audience inside.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Christmas pageants aren't supposed to come with warning labels. Tradition demands that they proclaim, "Come one, come all, and don't forget the kids!" Not so with Revolving Door Productions' "A Dolt's Only Christmas Pageant," which opens Wednesday for a three-night run at the Tribune Theatre. There it is, standing out like a guy with a hockey mask and chain saw, on the show's press releases: "NOT SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN OR IMPRESSIONABLE ADULTS."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1994 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Revolving Door Productions has been spinning unevenly at the Tribune Theatre. A lame attempt at Shakespeare a few months ago was followed by an interesting but spotty evening of one-acts. But it's such a young and ambitious company that something was bound to get through the door on one spin or another. "Mud," a tragedy by Maria Irene Fornes, is an unusual piece for the troupe to be interested in. But it happens to be exactly Revolving Door's piece of meat. The group attacks "Mud" with bravado.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1995 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sam Shepard may be the ultimate example of that group of '60s and '70s playwrights who saw life through a glass cracked and smeared with offal. Their art was rhyparography, defined in Webster's Unabridged as the "painted or literary depiction of mean or sordid subjects." When Shepard is at his most honest, his plays are at their finest. Later in his career as a writer, his overindulgence, while still noticeable, got less in the way of the truth of his statements.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1995 | M.E. WARREN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's been almost half a century since Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Genet and Samuel Beckett became the beacons of a new artistic movement that came to be called theater of the absurd. Distilling man's most fundamental philosophical questions into brutal farce, their landmark plays, including "No Exit," "The Balcony" and "Waiting for Godot," still surprise audiences with a roller-coaster intellectualism that elicits squeals, giggles and an unsettled feeling.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1999 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If the caliber of its productions continues along the lines of its second offering--a revival of Fay and Michael Kanin's adaptation of the brain-tickling Japanese tale "Rashomon"--Rude Guerrilla Theatre Company might want to think about changing its name. Neither rude nor subversive, director Patrick Gwaltney's staging is rather a study in grace, quietly building passions and the human heart's mysteries.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1995 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Grey Haven is a run-down roadside tavern many miles from civilization on a lonely highway in Colorado. Owner Loretta (Shannon McDuff) serves bad food and rough drinks. Her customers are ragtag derelicts whose last stop this may be, assorted travelers and some offbeat locals. Revolving Doors' Tribune Theatre produces two plays, under the umbrella title "Tales From the Grey Haven," that take place in the tavern's back yard.
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