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Reward System

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NEWS
May 7, 1987
The City Council unanimously authorized rewards for information leading to the arrest and conviction of anyone vandalizing public property. The reward system, recommended by Police Chief Ted J. Mertens at the request of council members Gil Archuletta and Connie Sieber, would establish a $50 reward in cases of vandalism costing less than $500 and a $100 reward for more than $500 damage to city property, buildings and parks.
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HEALTH
April 4, 2014 | By Lily Dayton
Picture potato chips or chocolate - or any food you feel you can't resist. Chances are, your brain associates this food with a promise of happiness, says Kelly McGonigal, psychology instructor at Stanford University. But foods we have little control around act like the elusive carrot on a stick: The more we eat, the more we want. We never feel we have enough because the promise of reward is always in front of us - if only we eat one more, then another, and soon we're left with crumbs at the bottom of the bag. Yet the longing remains.
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HEALTH
April 4, 2014 | By Lily Dayton
Picture potato chips or chocolate - or any food you feel you can't resist. Chances are, your brain associates this food with a promise of happiness, says Kelly McGonigal, psychology instructor at Stanford University. But foods we have little control around act like the elusive carrot on a stick: The more we eat, the more we want. We never feel we have enough because the promise of reward is always in front of us - if only we eat one more, then another, and soon we're left with crumbs at the bottom of the bag. Yet the longing remains.
SCIENCE
March 6, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Everyone dislikes some kind of music, but are there people out there who don't respond to musical pathos? Apparently, yes, and they weren't lying when they said so, according to a study published online Thursday in Current Biology. A team of researchers from Spain and Canada was trying to develop an accurate questionnaire to gauge people's sense of reward from music when they found that roughly 5% of their study subjects reported getting no pleasure at all from music. So they followed up by testing 30 subjects, grouped by their relative affinity for music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1995 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gary Ries thought he had found the perfect job. He slept in, watched soap operas, padded around in socks. Some months, the money just rolled in, and he never had to leave the house. All he had to do was listen for the rattle of spray-paint cans, get out his camera and videotape the gang members who were painting the wall across the street from his Hollywood apartment. Ries' paycheck was usually guaranteed--courtesy of the city of Los Angeles. Call it cashing in on a crime wave.
SCIENCE
August 29, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
What makes Facebook a rewarding experience instead of a bummer? It may be that monitoring “likes” and feedback stimulates the same part of your brain that fires up in response to imagery of food, sex and rewards in general, a new study suggests. Researchers found that brain scans taken while someone received positive feedback could be used to predict that user's intensity of Facebook use. The results suggest that people may be driven to use Facebook by a desire to monitor their reputation, said neurologist Dar Meshi of the Free University of Berlin, lead author of the study published Thursday in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1986 | DELTHIA RICKS, United Press International
The government can generate more revenue at lower cost by rewarding people who tell the truth on tax forms and punishing those who lie, a Caltech research team has concluded. Economists studying ways to make tax auditing more efficient created a game governed by mathematical principles to illustrate how the Internal Revenue Service might increase the amount of money it can collect.
SCIENCE
March 6, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Everyone dislikes some kind of music, but are there people out there who don't respond to musical pathos? Apparently, yes, and they weren't lying when they said so, according to a study published online Thursday in Current Biology. A team of researchers from Spain and Canada was trying to develop an accurate questionnaire to gauge people's sense of reward from music when they found that roughly 5% of their study subjects reported getting no pleasure at all from music. So they followed up by testing 30 subjects, grouped by their relative affinity for music.
HEALTH
October 18, 2010 | By Marilyn Elias, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Sweet is revenge," Lord Byron wrote in "Don Juan" ? and how could it be otherwise? Who wouldn't enjoy getting even with a sadistic boss, a two-faced friend who slept with your spouse or that teacher who had it in for your child for no good reason? Most of us have revenge fantasies, human behavior researchers say, and nearly everyone believes that punishing someone who did him wrong would feel tremendously satisfying. But new studies suggest the reality of revenge is far different.
SPORTS
March 9, 2012
It is amazing to me that when confronted with the Saints bounty scandal, people are discussing what level of fines, suspensions and sanctions would be appropriate. This is criminal activity. It's Tonya Harding stuff. In that case, people went to prison. If Johnny Perp organized a couple dozen of his friends to ambush off-duty cops in bars and crush their trigger fingers, do you think the police would be talking about fines? It was known at the highest levels of the organization.
SCIENCE
August 29, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
What makes Facebook a rewarding experience instead of a bummer? It may be that monitoring “likes” and feedback stimulates the same part of your brain that fires up in response to imagery of food, sex and rewards in general, a new study suggests. Researchers found that brain scans taken while someone received positive feedback could be used to predict that user's intensity of Facebook use. The results suggest that people may be driven to use Facebook by a desire to monitor their reputation, said neurologist Dar Meshi of the Free University of Berlin, lead author of the study published Thursday in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.
SPORTS
March 9, 2012
It is amazing to me that when confronted with the Saints bounty scandal, people are discussing what level of fines, suspensions and sanctions would be appropriate. This is criminal activity. It's Tonya Harding stuff. In that case, people went to prison. If Johnny Perp organized a couple dozen of his friends to ambush off-duty cops in bars and crush their trigger fingers, do you think the police would be talking about fines? It was known at the highest levels of the organization.
HEALTH
October 18, 2010 | By Marilyn Elias, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Sweet is revenge," Lord Byron wrote in "Don Juan" ? and how could it be otherwise? Who wouldn't enjoy getting even with a sadistic boss, a two-faced friend who slept with your spouse or that teacher who had it in for your child for no good reason? Most of us have revenge fantasies, human behavior researchers say, and nearly everyone believes that punishing someone who did him wrong would feel tremendously satisfying. But new studies suggest the reality of revenge is far different.
HEALTH
October 8, 2007 | Jay Blahnik, Special to The Times
Question: I've started an exercise program many times, but I can never seem to stick to it for more than a month or so. Can you give me some advice that might make it easier? Jill Palm Springs Answer: The single biggest exercise challenge for most people is remaining consistent. Family and work responsibilities, special events and even traffic can make it tough to fit exercise into our busy schedules, but here are some practical tips to help your exercise regimen stick: * Buddy up.
NEWS
September 26, 1998 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Japan resumed its attempt this week to repair a crippled banking system--a task on which the recovery of Asia arguably depends--there may be no clearer example of the obstacles it faces than the cultural resistance to simply rewarding bank employees for doing a good job. This is hardly a revolutionary concept for most Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1995 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gary Ries thought he had found the perfect job. He slept in, watched soap operas, padded around in socks. Some months, the money just rolled in, and he never had to leave the house. All he had to do was listen for the rattle of spray-paint cans, get out his camera and videotape the gang members who were painting the wall across the street from his Hollywood apartment. Ries' paycheck was usually guaranteed--courtesy of the city of Los Angeles. Call it cashing in on a crime wave.
NEWS
September 26, 1998 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Japan resumed its attempt this week to repair a crippled banking system--a task on which the recovery of Asia arguably depends--there may be no clearer example of the obstacles it faces than the cultural resistance to simply rewarding bank employees for doing a good job. This is hardly a revolutionary concept for most Americans.
SPORTS
April 6, 1994 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob Gustafson is almost embarrassed to admit it now, but he actually voted against the Southern Section's new scoring system for boys' tennis. Gustafson's San Clemente team has made the county's biggest turnaround, rebounding from a 1-17 record last season to open 8-1 this year. The reason for the turnaround? Of course, the new scoring system. Gustafson's well-balanced but not star-studded team probably has benefited from the sudden emphasis on doubles more than any other in the county.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1994 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN and JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
You wouldn't know it by looking at the chief executive's base salary, but Fidelity National Financial Inc. placed first among Orange County companies in stock appreciation over a five-year period. The nation's fifth largest title insurance companies, Newport Beach-based Fidelity saw the value of its shares increase more than tenfold. According to its proxy statement to shareholders, $100 invested in Fidelity shares in 1988 was worth $1,388.50 at the end of the company's 1993 fiscal year.
SPORTS
April 6, 1994 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob Gustafson is almost embarrassed to admit it now, but he actually voted against the Southern Section's new scoring system for boys' tennis. Gustafson's San Clemente team has made the county's biggest turnaround, rebounding from a 1-17 record last season to open 8-1 this year. The reason for the turnaround? Of course, the new scoring system. Gustafson's well-balanced but not star-studded team probably has benefited from the sudden emphasis on doubles more than any other in the county.
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