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Rex Harrison

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2013 | By Susan King
British actor-singer Noel Harrison, best known for his recording of the Oscar-winning ballad  "The Windmills of Your Mind" and as secret agent Mark Slate in NBC's 1960s TV series "The Girl from U.N.C.L.E," died Saturday night at the age of 79. Harrison suffered a  heart attack at his home in Ashburton, Devon in England after performing at the village of Black Dog in Devon. His wife, Lori Chapman, told the Press Association, "He will be loved and missed by more people than I ever knew.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2013
Noel Harrison British singer-actor and skier Noel Harrison, 79, the British actor-singer best known for his recording of the Academy Award-winning ballad "The Windmills of Your Mind" from the 1968 film "The Thomas Crown Affair" and for his role as secret agent Mark Slate in the 1960s TV series "The Girl from U.N.C.L.E.," has died in England. Harrison suffered a heart attack after a performance Saturday in Devon and died at a hospital, his wife, Lori Chapman, told British media Tuesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1990 | United Press International
Elegantly attired ladies in wide hats and impeccably dressed gentlemen crushed together with fans in the Church of the Transfiguration today to honor the memory of actor Rex Harrison. "Let the angels beware," warned his son, Noel Harrison. "There is an unreconstructed man among you who hates the sanctimonious." He recalled that only a few days before his father died of pancreatic cancer on June 2, he said, "I've got a new philosophy of life, don't cower, charge."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2013 | By Susan King
British actor-singer Noel Harrison, best known for his recording of the Oscar-winning ballad  "The Windmills of Your Mind" and as secret agent Mark Slate in NBC's 1960s TV series "The Girl from U.N.C.L.E," died Saturday night at the age of 79. Harrison suffered a  heart attack at his home in Ashburton, Devon in England after performing at the village of Black Dog in Devon. His wife, Lori Chapman, told the Press Association, "He will be loved and missed by more people than I ever knew.
NEWS
June 16, 1990 | JOSEPH N. BELL
At my age, the death of any public figure is certain to stir memories, but the departure of Rex Harrison was especially evocative. Harrison--more or less inadvertently--taught me two lessons that have been of enormous help to me through much of my life. I chose to quit a well-paying, full-time job to turn to the fragile livelihood of free-lance writing the same year (1956) that "My Fair Lady" opened on Broadway. Although I had the full support of my family, it was a difficult year financially.
NEWS
June 16, 1989 | From Reuters
Veteran British actor Rex Harrison received a knighthood today in a traditional annual honors list marking the official birthday of Queen Elizabeth II. Harrison, 81, began acting in 1924 and won an Oscar for his best-known role as Prof. Henry Higgins in the 1964 movie "My Fair Lady." A fellow movie star, former President Ronald Reagan, received an honorary knighthood from the queen on Wednesday. 900 Awards Bestowed The queen bestowed more than 900 awards for meritorious service in all walks of life.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Rex Harrison, the sophisticated veteran of Noel Coward's drawing-room comedies of the 1930s, but known best to millions around the world as Prof. Henry Higgins in "My Fair Lady," died Saturday. He was 82. Harrison died in his sleep of pancreatic cancer at his Manhattan apartment, three weeks after dropping out of the hit Broadway show, "The Circle," said his attorney, Harold Schiff.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
The stage can prosper on form ("Cats," "Les Miserables"), content (Pinter, Ionesco, Shakespeare) and performance and any mixtures of the above. Yet there is nothing quite like the star turn to conquer an audience and gallop triumphantly over any lurking difficulties a production might have. Somerset Maugham's "The Circle" was first done nearly 70 years ago, in the very different world of 1921, and by now it seems the very model of the well-made play of a very different time indeed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2012
"Sexy Rexy" was the nickname of what Oscar- and Tony Award-winning British actor? Rex Harrison
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Actor Rex Harrison, 81, made it through two acts of W. Somerset Maugham's 1921 play "The Circle" Wednesday night in Baltimore, but was unable to finish because he was suffering pain from dental surgery. The audience was told he was unable to continue and an understudy took over. The play is headed for Broadway on Nov. 20 with Harrison, Glynis John and Stewart Granger as the stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2012
"Sexy Rexy" was the nickname of what Oscar- and Tony Award-winning British actor? Rex Harrison
BOOKS
February 24, 1991 | Chris Goodrich
A DAMNED SERIOUS BUSINESS: My Life in Comedy by Rex Harrison (Bantam Books: $21.95; 288 pp.). The complete quote from which Rex Harrison has taken the title of his autobiography is David Garrick's famous avowal that "Any fool can play Tragedy, but Comedy, Sir, is a damned serious business." It's a prescription with which Harrison agrees--to a fault, in fact, for the actor reveals little about himself in this volume other than his constant need to work.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1990 | United Press International
Elegantly attired ladies in wide hats and impeccably dressed gentlemen crushed together with fans in the Church of the Transfiguration today to honor the memory of actor Rex Harrison. "Let the angels beware," warned his son, Noel Harrison. "There is an unreconstructed man among you who hates the sanctimonious." He recalled that only a few days before his father died of pancreatic cancer on June 2, he said, "I've got a new philosophy of life, don't cower, charge."
NEWS
June 16, 1990 | JOSEPH N. BELL
At my age, the death of any public figure is certain to stir memories, but the departure of Rex Harrison was especially evocative. Harrison--more or less inadvertently--taught me two lessons that have been of enormous help to me through much of my life. I chose to quit a well-paying, full-time job to turn to the fragile livelihood of free-lance writing the same year (1956) that "My Fair Lady" opened on Broadway. Although I had the full support of my family, it was a difficult year financially.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
Not all men can wear tuxedos. On most of us they look rented even if they are not, and our likeliest fate is to be mistaken for a waiter or, possibly, a maitre d'. But not Rex Harrison, who wore the dinner jacket as naturally as John Wayne wore cavalry blue, and belonged in the drawing room as inevitably as Wayne belonged on a horse.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Rex Harrison, the sophisticated veteran of Noel Coward's drawing-room comedies of the 1930s, but known best to millions around the world as Prof. Henry Higgins in "My Fair Lady," died Saturday. He was 82. Harrison died in his sleep of pancreatic cancer at his Manhattan apartment, three weeks after dropping out of the hit Broadway show, "The Circle," said his attorney, Harold Schiff.
NEWS
April 30, 1989
Aaron R. Frosch, a theatrical-industry attorney who represented such entertainers as Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor, died Saturday. Frosch, 64, died in his sleep at his home in New York City after a lengthy illness, a family member said. Frosch graduated from Brooklyn Law School to build a practice that counted many stage and screen performers, Rex Harrison and Richard Burton among them, as clients. It was his work for Monroe and Taylor that drew public attention.
BOOKS
February 24, 1991 | Chris Goodrich
A DAMNED SERIOUS BUSINESS: My Life in Comedy by Rex Harrison (Bantam Books: $21.95; 288 pp.). The complete quote from which Rex Harrison has taken the title of his autobiography is David Garrick's famous avowal that "Any fool can play Tragedy, but Comedy, Sir, is a damned serious business." It's a prescription with which Harrison agrees--to a fault, in fact, for the actor reveals little about himself in this volume other than his constant need to work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
The stage can prosper on form ("Cats," "Les Miserables"), content (Pinter, Ionesco, Shakespeare) and performance and any mixtures of the above. Yet there is nothing quite like the star turn to conquer an audience and gallop triumphantly over any lurking difficulties a production might have. Somerset Maugham's "The Circle" was first done nearly 70 years ago, in the very different world of 1921, and by now it seems the very model of the well-made play of a very different time indeed.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Actor Rex Harrison, 81, made it through two acts of W. Somerset Maugham's 1921 play "The Circle" Wednesday night in Baltimore, but was unable to finish because he was suffering pain from dental surgery. The audience was told he was unable to continue and an understudy took over. The play is headed for Broadway on Nov. 20 with Harrison, Glynis John and Stewart Granger as the stars.
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