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Rex Sinquefield

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BUSINESS
December 30, 2005 | Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writer
Rex Sinquefield gave up plans to become a Catholic priest in favor of a career in finance. The church, he jokes, is better off. And so is the investment world, according to Sinquefield's many fans. The 61-year-old Sinquefield will end an era today as he steps down as co-chairman of Santa Monica-based Dimensional Fund Advisors, an $86-billion-asset money management firm.
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BUSINESS
December 30, 2005 | Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writer
Rex Sinquefield gave up plans to become a Catholic priest in favor of a career in finance. The church, he jokes, is better off. And so is the investment world, according to Sinquefield's many fans. The 61-year-old Sinquefield will end an era today as he steps down as co-chairman of Santa Monica-based Dimensional Fund Advisors, an $86-billion-asset money management firm.
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BUSINESS
December 30, 2005 | Tom Petruno
Most "passive" investment funds seek to track specific market indexes, like the Standard & Poor's 500. Dimensional Fund Advisors approaches passive investing differently. "We say we're passive but not index," said Rex Sinquefield, the firm's co-founder. "We don't worry about perfect tracking of an index." Instead, the firm's managers essentially create their own indexes, fashioning portfolios from hundreds or thousands of stocks in their market niches -- for example, small Japanese shares.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2005 | Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writer
Rex Sinquefield, one of the fathers of so-called passive or index stock market investing, said Thursday that he would retire at year's end from Dimensional Fund Advisors Inc., his Santa Monica-based investment firm. Sinquefield, 60, said he wanted to spend more time on his 1,000-acre farm in Missouri and also planned to found an economic think tank. His wife, Jeanne Sinquefield, 58, who supervises Dimensional's trading, also plans to step down.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2008 | Tom Petruno, Petruno is a Times staff writer.
David Booth, chief executive of Santa Monica money manager Dimensional Fund Advisors, has given a $300-million gift to the University of Chicago's famed business school -- the largest ever donation to the university. The school now will be named for the 61-year-old Booth, a 1971 MBA graduate who has long kept a low profile in the money management business despite his success.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1996 | TOM PETRUNO
An investor's best shot at earning above-average future returns on stocks is to buy those issues that are most out of favor today. That's one approach that has gained favor in recent years, even with "efficient market " theorists who used to argue that the market simply couldn't be beat in the long run.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1997 | LINDA STERN, Linda Stern is a freelance writer who covers personal finance issues for Reuters
Investment success is part science, part art and oodles of luck. If you've ever wondered why some money managers seem to have more luck than others, it probably has to do with the way they approach the art and science of investing. "Investment Gurus," a new book by Peter Tanous (1997, New York Institute of Finance, $24.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1988 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Contradictions and confusion. Interest rates are going up, but the U.S. economy is slowing down--or speeding up. High inflation may be coming back--or it may not. With the economy as uncertain as the weather, what's the average person to do about investing money? Experts aren't sure.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO
What do you think you can earn on stock and bond investments in the 1990s? Seven percent a year? Ten percent? More? It's a tough question, all right, but it's important for every investor to think about how to answer it. Being realistic about future returns on financial assets like stocks and bonds can help you decide between those investments and others that compete for your money--such as a home, bank CDs, etc. Public pension funds have to wrestle with the same question of "what will we earn?"
BUSINESS
October 30, 1988 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The government injected a dash of somber reality into speculation about bigger-than-ever leveraged buyouts last week. On Wednesday, it reported that the economy grew more slowly than expected in the July-September quarter and capital spending by business was disappointing. On Thursday, it said consumer spending in September was flat. To be sure, there was a bright side to the news and a promise of long-term investment opportunity. But in the context of a single week, things looked bleak.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO
Small stocks have been the stars of this year's bull market--most investors know that. But many investors also assume that because small stocks have been so hot for nine months, it must be too late to buy. What's going to make the stocks rise from here? the doubters ask.
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