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Reyes Syndrome

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NEWS
November 18, 1988 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday proposed a tougher warning label for aspirin that would urge women to avoid aspirin in the last three months of pregnancy. The agency also proposed new labeling for acetaminophen, another popular over-the-counter pain reliever used in such products as Tylenol and Anacin-3, that would strengthen an existing warning that consumers should seek treatment quickly if they take an accidental overdose.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1999
Reye's syndrome, a rare but deadly disorder usually caused by giving aspirin to children with flu or chickenpox, has almost disappeared, thanks to a public education campaign, researchers report in today's New England Journal of Medicine. From a high of 555 cases among American children in 1980, doctors have reported no more than 36 cases per year since 1987, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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NEWS
January 9, 1985 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
A new federal study has found such a strong association between the use of aspirin in children and the often-fatal Reye's Syndrome that scientists are expected to call for an immediate warning against the drug's use on ill youngsters. The still-unpublished pilot study conducted by the federal Centers for Disease Control found that children suffering from flu or chicken pox were 12 to 25 times more likely to develop the disease when given aspirin than were sick children who did not take the drug.
NEWS
December 10, 1993 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wading into the debate over the rights of U.S. consumers who do not speak English, the state Supreme Court on Thursday said manufacturers of non-prescription drugs need not print label warnings in foreign languages. The decision came in the case of Jorge Ramirez, a Modesto boy who contracted Reye's syndrome after his Spanish-speaking mother gave him St. Joseph's Aspirin for Children when he had a cold in 1986.
NEWS
May 31, 1987 | LARRY DOYLE, United Press International
Jessica Van Dyke was an exceptionally bright 13-year-old. Her parents cannot believe she would have taken aspirin for chicken pox if she had thought it anything but safe. "Our philosophy has always been, when there's any doubt, you don't do it," said Roger D. Heller, her stepfather. "That's what we always taught Jessica." Jessica liked to write poetry and played field hockey at Wiley Middle School in University Heights, a suburb of Cleveland.
NEWS
November 16, 1985 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The Food and Drug Administration has reached "an agreement in principle" with aspirin manufacturers to require mandatory labels on aspirin bottles with new, stronger language warning of the association between the drug and the sometimes fatal Reye's syndrome in children, congressional sources said Friday. If approved by Health and Human Services Secretary Margaret M.
NEWS
October 24, 1985 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on health, calling the aspirin industry's voluntary labeling program inadequate, voted Wednesday to require explicit messages on all aspirin containers warning of the association between the drug and the often-fatal Reye's syndrome in children and teen-agers. The subcommittee also voted to require warning labels for smokeless tobacco--chewing tobacco and snuff--and to prohibit broadcast advertising of the products.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1999
Reye's syndrome, a rare but deadly disorder usually caused by giving aspirin to children with flu or chickenpox, has almost disappeared, thanks to a public education campaign, researchers report in today's New England Journal of Medicine. From a high of 555 cases among American children in 1980, doctors have reported no more than 36 cases per year since 1987, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
September 23, 1987 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The number of cases of Reye's syndrome--the often-fatal childhood ailment associated with the use of aspirin in treating flu and chicken pox--declined "markedly" between 1980 and 1985, corresponding to "sharp" decreases in the purchase and use of children's aspirin during the same period, federal health officials said Tuesday. Reported cases decreased from a peak of 658 in 1980 to 93 in 1985, according to the Food and Drug Administration, which has been monitoring the trends.
NEWS
December 10, 1993 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wading into the debate over the rights of U.S. consumers who do not speak English, the state Supreme Court on Thursday said manufacturers of non-prescription drugs need not print label warnings in foreign languages. The decision came in the case of Jorge Ramirez, a Modesto boy who contracted Reye's syndrome after his Spanish-speaking mother gave him St. Joseph's Aspirin for Children when he had a cold in 1986.
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday proposed a tougher warning label for aspirin that would urge women to avoid aspirin in the last three months of pregnancy. The agency also proposed new labeling for acetaminophen, another popular over-the-counter pain reliever used in such products as Tylenol and Anacin-3, that would strengthen an existing warning that consumers should seek treatment quickly if they take an accidental overdose.
NEWS
September 23, 1987 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The number of cases of Reye's syndrome--the often-fatal childhood ailment associated with the use of aspirin in treating flu and chicken pox--declined "markedly" between 1980 and 1985, corresponding to "sharp" decreases in the purchase and use of children's aspirin during the same period, federal health officials said Tuesday. Reported cases decreased from a peak of 658 in 1980 to 93 in 1985, according to the Food and Drug Administration, which has been monitoring the trends.
NEWS
May 31, 1987 | LARRY DOYLE, United Press International
Jessica Van Dyke was an exceptionally bright 13-year-old. Her parents cannot believe she would have taken aspirin for chicken pox if she had thought it anything but safe. "Our philosophy has always been, when there's any doubt, you don't do it," said Roger D. Heller, her stepfather. "That's what we always taught Jessica." Jessica liked to write poetry and played field hockey at Wiley Middle School in University Heights, a suburb of Cleveland.
NEWS
November 16, 1985 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The Food and Drug Administration has reached "an agreement in principle" with aspirin manufacturers to require mandatory labels on aspirin bottles with new, stronger language warning of the association between the drug and the sometimes fatal Reye's syndrome in children, congressional sources said Friday. If approved by Health and Human Services Secretary Margaret M.
NEWS
October 24, 1985 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on health, calling the aspirin industry's voluntary labeling program inadequate, voted Wednesday to require explicit messages on all aspirin containers warning of the association between the drug and the often-fatal Reye's syndrome in children and teen-agers. The subcommittee also voted to require warning labels for smokeless tobacco--chewing tobacco and snuff--and to prohibit broadcast advertising of the products.
NEWS
January 9, 1985 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
A new federal study has found such a strong association between the use of aspirin in children and the often-fatal Reye's Syndrome that scientists are expected to call for an immediate warning against the drug's use on ill youngsters. The still-unpublished pilot study conducted by the federal Centers for Disease Control found that children suffering from flu or chicken pox were 12 to 25 times more likely to develop the disease when given aspirin than were sick children who did not take the drug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1993 | REBECCA BRYANT
A 19-year-old San Fernando Valley woman has been diagnosed with influenza A, a highly contagious respiratory infection that can lead to pneumonia and bronchitis and can be fatal. The woman was diagnosed Friday at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Woodland Hills. The symptoms of the disease include high fever, cough, headache, malaise and muscle aches. "It has much stronger symptoms than the common cold," said Laurene Mascola, chief of the county's acute communicable disease control unit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1985 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
Minutes after Thomas Wyrick was sentenced to 15 years to life in prison Thursday for murdering a 2-year-old girl, he borrowed the courtroom to marry the victim's mother. The bride, Sally Martinez, whose daughter Natalie died in 1983 while in Wyrick's care, believes Wyrick's claim that the child's injuries were the result of his attempt to administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation after she became ill, Wyrick's lawyer said.
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