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Reynolds Aluminum Recycling Co

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1988
A recently enacted state law requires cities and counties to permit the establishment of recycling centers on commercial and industrial zoned property. But the City Council, fearing that such collection centers may proliferate and become eyesores, moved Monday to exert additional control. The council adopted an ordinance giving the city some measure of authority over the "reverse vending-machines," which take cans and give money, as well as mobile recycling trailers.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1987 | VICTOR F. ZONANA
Despite California's new legislation encouraging recycling of all beer and soft drink containers, aluminum cans remain the most economically attractive for recycling. Aluminum cans are light and easy to transport, and recycling saves about 90% of the energy required to extract aluminum from bauxite ore. In a typical recycling operation, unwashed cans are shredded, melted at 1,100 degrees to 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit, cast into ingots and rolled into sheets.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shoppers frustrated by the closing of hundreds of beverage-container recycling centers around the state will probably see many reopening in the next few months, according to major recycling firms. The collection companies had long charged that state recycling laws made many of their centers money-losers. Now several bills supported by the collectors to improve recycling economics--particularly for such materials as glass--have been signed into law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1986 | REBECCA KOLBERG, United Press International
A new breed of entrepreneurs reminiscent of old-fashioned rag pickers has appeared on the urban scene, trundling battered grocery carts up and down alleys in search of recyclable aluminum cans. At first glance, many of the "cart" people appear to belong to the mass of homeless people who frequent downtown areas of major U.S. cities. But most are far removed from that desperate world, if not so much by appearance as by attitude.
NEWS
February 13, 1986 | ROSELLE M. LEWIS
Junk ain't junk no more Cause junk can win the war. What's junk to you Has a job to do Cause junk ain't junk no more. --1942 song by Allen Kent and Austin Croom-Johnson W B Music Corp. Since the end of World War II, with its rationing and scrap drives, Americans have possibly become the world's most conspicuous consumers. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, every American throws out more than four pounds of junk each day.
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