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April 26, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Reynolds American Inc. vaulted into the smokeless-tobacco market by agreeing to pay $3.5 billion for the maker of Kodiak snuff and Levi Garrett chewing tobacco. The company behind Camel and Kool cigarettes is buying Memphis, Tenn.-based Conwood, owned by the holding company for Chicago's Pritzker family.
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BUSINESS
April 26, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Reynolds American Inc. vaulted into the smokeless-tobacco market by agreeing to pay $3.5 billion for the maker of Kodiak snuff and Levi Garrett chewing tobacco. The company behind Camel and Kool cigarettes is buying Memphis, Tenn.-based Conwood, owned by the holding company for Chicago's Pritzker family.
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BUSINESS
February 10, 2005 | From Reuters
A federal appeals court threw out a $15-million punitive damage award to a lifelong smoker who sued R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. after losing his legs from a cigarette-related illness. But the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, in a split decision, left intact a Kansas jury's compensatory damages of $196,416, finding the cigarette maker failed to warn David Burton of the dangers of smoking.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. will pay $1.46 million as part of a settlement with New York, Illinois and Maryland over the marketing of Kool cigarettes. R.J. Reynolds agreed to "substantial limitations" on future "Kool Mixx" campaigns that authorities said targeted children, New York Atty. Gen. Eliot Spitzer said. The suit also named British American Tobacco's Brown & Williamson unit, maker of Kool cigarettes, which Reynolds bought in July. A spokeswoman for R.J.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
A New York jury ordered Altria Group Inc.'s Philip Morris USA and Reynolds American Inc. to pay $3.4 million to a woman who said smoking caused her lung cancer. Norma Rose, 72, and her husband, Leonard, sued Philip Morris, the biggest U.S. cigarette maker, and American Tobacco, said Stuart Finz, the couple's lawyer. Reynolds American, the No. 2 cigarette maker, is the successor to American Tobacco, which no longer exists. The jury will consider a possible award of punitive damages.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2005 | From Reuters
A jury in Independence, Mo., ordered Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. to pay $22 million to the family of a 73-year-old woman who died of lung and heart disease after smoking Kools for 58 years. Ken McClain, attorney for the woman's family, said the jury found Brown & Williamson, a unit of Reynolds American Inc., liable for 25% of the illness that led to Barbara Smith's death in 2000.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Reynolds American Inc., the No. 2 U.S. cigarette maker, said second-quarter profit more than doubled because it cut costs ahead of last week's $3-billion acquisition of Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. Net income climbed to $151 million, or $1.77 a share, from $70 million, or 83 cents, a year earlier, the Winston-Salem, N.C.-based company said. Sales fell 5.5% to $1.35 billion at the company, known as R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Holdings Inc. before the purchase.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
The Justice Department asked a federal appeals court to let it pursue a $280-billion racketeering claim against Altria Group Inc.'s Philip Morris USA, Reynolds American Inc. and other U.S. cigarette makers. U.S. racketeering laws permit the forfeiture or "disgorgement" of profits that the industry allegedly made from selling cigarettes to people who started smoking as children, government lawyers argued in papers filed with the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
A Minnesota judge said smokers who bought "light" cigarettes couldn't sue Reynolds American Inc.'s R.J. Reynolds Tobacco unit over claims that the company defrauded them. The smokers' claims are precluded by federal cigarette labeling laws, which don't permit states to impose additional requirements on tobacco companies, Minnesota District Judge Diana S. Eagon said in a decision. Separately, the National Assn. of Attorneys General said it had warned R.J.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
An appeals court for a second time dismissed lawsuits that accused Reynolds American Inc. and British American Tobacco of smuggling cigarettes to avoid taxes and customs duties. The ruling by the 2nd U.S. Court of Appeals in New York rejected separate lawsuits by the European Union and by 25 departments of Colombia, which are equivalent to U.S. states. The European Union sued R.J. Reynolds, a unit of Reynolds American.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2006 | From Reuters
A U.S. appeals court has decided to review a lower court ruling that let a $200-billion lawsuit filed by "light" cigarette smokers proceed as a class action and stopped proceedings in the suit. Defendants in the case include Altria Group Inc.'s Philip Morris USA unit, Reynolds American Inc.'s R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Loews Corp.'s Lorillard Tobacco unit, Vector Group Ltd.'s Liggett Group and British American Tobacco (Investments) Ltd. In September, U.S.
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