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Reynolds Price

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
In 1984, when he was 51, novelist Reynolds Price learned that a pencil-shaped tumor, about 10 inches long and malignant, had invaded his spine. Several surgeries and dozens of radiation treatments followed, leaving him a paraplegic racked with pain and the uncertainty of his survival. His happy life of teaching Milton at Duke University and writing several hours a day was over, or so it seemed in his many dark moments. Then, after a year of this agony, something miraculous happened: He knocked out a commissioned play in two months and finished the last two-thirds of his seventh novel, "Kate Vaiden," which won the National Book Critics Circle Award as the best work of fiction in 1986.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
In 1984, when he was 51, novelist Reynolds Price learned that a pencil-shaped tumor, about 10 inches long and malignant, had invaded his spine. Several surgeries and dozens of radiation treatments followed, leaving him a paraplegic racked with pain and the uncertainty of his survival. His happy life of teaching Milton at Duke University and writing several hours a day was over, or so it seemed in his many dark moments. Then, after a year of this agony, something miraculous happened: He knocked out a commissioned play in two months and finished the last two-thirds of his seventh novel, "Kate Vaiden," which won the National Book Critics Circle Award as the best work of fiction in 1986.
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BOOKS
December 29, 1996 | CHRISTOPHER TILGHMAN
In the preface to his splendid and exhilarating new exploration of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ, Reynolds Price tells us that the stories--the "central narratives" as he calls them, in the Old Testament and New Testament--"drew early at my mind and have kept their magnetism for me . . . undiminished for nearly six decades."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2009 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Spring is impossibly verdant in Raleigh, so lush it's steamy. The path to the door of Reynolds Price's house in the woods is scattered with beechnuts. Tree frogs babble, the screen door slams, somewhere in the pond outside the kitchen an old snapping turtle raises its head. It's hard not to think of the song "Copperline" which Price wrote with his friend and fellow North Carolinian, James Taylor. Price, 76, is North Carolina born and bred.
BOOKS
May 17, 1987 | Helen Buck Bartlett, Bartlett is a contributing editor for The Paris Review. and
W.H. Auden once wrote, "Through art, we are able to break bread with the dead, and without communion with the dead a fully human life is impossible." In June of 1982, Reynolds Price discovered he had cancer. Many of the poems in this collection explore the territory of dying. As a poet, he treads the line between the living and the dead. He writes to the dead, and the dead speak back through his poems. Price is best known as a novelist.
BOOKS
June 21, 1992 | Michael Coffey, Coffey is at work on a novel about John Brown
Readers of Reynolds Price have come to expect a certain something from the man--portraits of flawed, homely Southern men and women with messy pasts and proud bearings, living in a kind of Sophoclean twilight. Like the great Greek tragedian, Price opposes guilt and fate, agency and innocence, in a contest cleverly rigged by its creator.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When you tell Reynolds Price that you hope to see him on this or that day, the fates be willing, he laughs with such understanding that you know you've touched on an idea he has thought about more than a little. Struck by cancer of the spinal cord six years ago, the author is no longer so bold as to challenge destiny with a level gaze.
BOOKS
May 22, 1988 | Sven Birkerts, Birkerts is the author of "An Artificial Wilderness: Essays on Twentieth Century Literature" (William Morrow). and
Reynolds Price's first novel, "A Long and Happy Life," originally published in 1962, recounted--or, better, evoked--the back-country courtship of the young Rosacoke Mustian and Wesley Beavers. Beginning with "Wesley's impulsive and short-lived abandonment of Rosa at her friend's funeral, encompassing their awkward sexual initiation, the novel culminated with Wesley's decision to do the right thing by the girl he'd made pregnant. A quarter century later, it remains a nearly perfect novella.
BOOKS
June 30, 1996 | Christopher Tilghman, Christopher Tilghman is the author of the short story collection, "In a Father's Place," and the novel, "Mason's Retreat," just published by Random House
In the preface to his splendid and exhilarating new exploration of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ, "Three Gospels," fiction writer Reynolds Price tells us that the stories--the "central narratives" as he calls them, in the Old and New Testament--"drew early at my mind and have kept their magnetism for me . . . undiminished for nearly six decades."
BOOKS
June 16, 1991 | Winston Groom, Groom is a novelist and screenwriter living in Magnolia Springs, Ala
Comes now Reynolds Price with his 22nd book, consisting of three "long-form" stories in the North Carolina setting he is so comfortable with. They concern men going to or returning from war; in the first two, World War II, and in the last, Vietnam. In each, Price explores his characters' relationships with women, wives or otherwise, in the context--greater or lesser--of their military experience. In two of the stories, miscegenation is a major theme; the third revolves around jealousy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2005 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
THERE seems to be scarcely an American writer who has not been drawn to the events of 9/11. Now it is the turn of the prolific Southern novelist Reynolds Price. In "The Good Priest's Son," his 36th book, Price has his Southern protagonist, Mabry Kincaid, an art conservator, living in a loft near the World Trade Center. That fatal morning Mabry -- no name could be more Southern -- is flying home from France with a small picture for a New York client.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2003 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
A Serious Way of Wondering The Ethics of Jesus Imagined Reynolds Price Scribner: 148 pp., $23 A Serious Way of Wondering The Ethics of Jesus Imagined Reynolds Price Scribner: 148 pp., $23 * Novelist and poet Reynolds Price has written a number of books in which he brings biblical stories to life for contemporary readers.
BOOKS
September 24, 2000
A PERFECT FRIEND By Reynolds Price; Jacket illustration by Maurice Sendak; Simon & Schuster/Atheneum: 128 pp., $16 In his first book for children, Reynolds Price pens a slow, dreamy story of a boy wrestling with grief over his mother's death. Ben Barks, now 11, and his mother used to spend hours drawing elephants and reading about them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1999 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nothing concentrates the mind on God, to slightly mangle an old saying, more than the imminent prospect of one's own death. That explains why Reynolds Price, among the most accomplished and honored novelists of his generation, was moved to think out loud about God during his decade of struggle with spinal cancer in the 1980s.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Philip Morris Cos. and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. on Monday raised wholesale prices on their cigarettes by 5 cents a pack, or $2.50 per thousand cigarettes, effective immediately. The increase is the fourth in 14 months for the nation's two largest cigarette makers. In a separate development, BAT Industries' Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp.
BOOKS
December 29, 1996 | CHRISTOPHER TILGHMAN
In the preface to his splendid and exhilarating new exploration of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ, Reynolds Price tells us that the stories--the "central narratives" as he calls them, in the Old Testament and New Testament--"drew early at my mind and have kept their magnetism for me . . . undiminished for nearly six decades."
BOOKS
July 16, 1995 | John Gregory Brown, John Gregory Brown is the author of the novel "Decorations in a Ruined Cemetery." He holds the Julia Jackson Nichols Chair in English and Creative Writing at Sweet Briar College in Virginia
The shadow cast by the ghost of William Faulkner over the Southern novel is a lengthy, broad-shouldered, even menacing one. When a Southern novelist thinks for a moment that he might try to grow something in the literary garden concerning the awful weight of family or the exquisite and torturous allure of memory, there's the ghost of ol' Bill using his mighty figure to forever block the sun.
BOOKS
January 3, 1988 | Brian Stonehill, Stonehill teaches contemporary fiction at Pomona College
A novelist and story writer of genuine distinction, Reynolds Price has ever been a realist, embracing Aristotle's view that the artist's job is to imitate life as he sees it. But Price has never been content, in his fiction, to present a narrow, personal view; he has always reached for the universals that account for our predicament.
NEWS
July 19, 1996 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his paper coffee cup on the blue tablecloth before him, Reynolds Price reads from his new book. At first it sounds presumptuous: "Then they led him out to crucify him," he begins. Clearly, the line is not his own. In "Three Gospels" (Scribner), Price crosses over from his usual place as a fiction writer to translate the Greek New Testament Gospels of Mark and John, with a scholarly critique of both. The third gospel is his own. He wrote it based on Mark's account.
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