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Reza Abdoh

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MAGAZINE
February 10, 1991
Reza Abdoh was given praise as a "Southern California's theatrical wunderkind ." The article credits him as creator and director of seven original pieces. What is missing, however, is any mention of Mira-Lani Oglesby, the talented co-author of three of Abdoh's most successful plays, "Peep Show," "Minimata" and "Father Was a Masculine Man." Oglesby's contribution deserves mention in any discussion of the works, and, in my opinion, this article was simply not complete without it. HELMI A. HISSERICH Los Angeles
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1995 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A subdued crowd of approximately 250 gathered at the Mark Taper Forum on Thursday for a memorial in honor of avant-garde theater director Reza Abdoh, who died May 11 in New York of complications of AIDS. An image of Abdoh's face--with its chiseled features, dark eyes, heavy brows and full lips--was projected onto the back wall of the set of the current production of Terrence McNally's "Master Class."
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NEWS
May 12, 1995 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reza Abdoh, the confrontational theater and operatic director whose casts mooned audiences, became slaves under torture and hung nude and upside down in fish tanks, died Thursday. His producer, Diane White, said he died in his New York City home at age 32 of the complications of AIDS. The half-Persian, half-Italian writer and philosopher, whose in-your-face theatrical spectacles prompted equal amounts of rage and applause, made his life an animated protest of what he saw as a society in decay.
NEWS
May 12, 1995 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reza Abdoh, the confrontational theater and operatic director whose casts mooned audiences, became slaves under torture and hung nude and upside down in fish tanks, died Thursday. His producer, Diane White, said he died in his New York City home at age 32 of the complications of AIDS. The half-Persian, half-Italian writer and philosopher, whose in-your-face theatrical spectacles prompted equal amounts of rage and applause, made his life an animated protest of what he saw as a society in decay.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Corporate greed and environmental pollution are the targets of playwright Reza Abdoh in "Minamata," opening Friday at the Los Angeles Theatre Center. "Minamata is the name of a fishing village in Japan," said the writer-director ("Peep Show," "Eva Peron," "Rusty Sat on a Hill One Dawn and Watched the Moon Go Down"), who wrote the piece with Mira-Lani Oglesby. "Chisso, a company that makes parts for plastic, dumped mercury waste into the water supply and the fishermen got sick. A high percentage of the villages depended on fish and fishing so their livelihoods dried up too. "The story of Minamata is just the departure point for the play," the writer said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
There was a time when Reza Abdoh was into activism. Even lyricism (remember "Rusty Sat on a Hill One Dawn and Watched the Moon Go Down"?). But the balance started to shift last year with "The Hip-Hop Waltz of Eurydice." A stridency pierced the work like a knife. Now the mood has tilted--plunged or soared, depending on the point of view.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1995 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A subdued crowd of approximately 250 gathered at the Mark Taper Forum on Thursday for a memorial in honor of avant-garde theater director Reza Abdoh, who died May 11 in New York of complications of AIDS. An image of Abdoh's face--with its chiseled features, dark eyes, heavy brows and full lips--was projected onto the back wall of the set of the current production of Terrence McNally's "Master Class."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1991 | RICHARD STAYTON, Richard Stayton is a playwright and freelance journalist.
Do not go gentle into that good night Rage, rage against the dying of the light. --Dylan Thomas It is 9:30 on a Saturday night and the cavernous lobby of Los Angeles Theatre Center is eerily vacant. Sounds from the four stages don't penetrate the 1916 bank building's thick marble walls. No one sits at the cafe tables. No one stands at the base of the towering thermometer poster that marks LATC donations, pleading in huge hand-printed letters: "Help the Miracle Continue by September 1!"
MAGAZINE
December 23, 1990 | Richard Stayton, Richard Stayton, former theater critic for the Los Angeles Herald Examiner, is a free-lance writer.
IT IS ALMOST NOON in rehearsal room 5C, and the cast and crew of the Los Angeles Theatre Center's 26th world premiere will soon start another day's work. An atmosphere of reverent meditation permeates this spare, windowless space. Verdi's Requiem mournfully echoes in the background. Lead actor Tom Fitzpatrick sits on the floor, shirtless, barefoot, twisting and turning his limber body into yogic positions.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Abdoh's Next Date: Reza Abdoh, creator of the controversial "Bogeyman" now playing at the Los Angeles Theatre Center, will unveil his newest work, "The Law of Remains," Jan. 27 in a former New York porno movie theater on 42nd Street. Based on the Egyptian Book of the Dead, the show marks the first New York production of Abdoh's Dar A Luz performance works company and will include several actors from the "Bogeyman" cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1995 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ken Roht is a choreographer and performer for Reza Abdoh, whose large-scale performance pieces at Los Angeles Theatre Center and elsewhere almost always provoke strong passions. Roht has created his own small-scale piece at Playwrights' Arena, "7 Seals and a Riding Monkey." Some of Roht's choreography here is indeed reminiscent of Abdoh productions--for example, a repeated image of a row of furious typists, counting out loud to themselves, lit spookily from below.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1993 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Reza Abdoh's "Quotations From a Ruined City" is a violent attack on violence. The promising and intermittently powerful work-in-progress--which has been one of the most anticipated events of the ongoing L.A. Festival--is a daring polemic that goes out on the edge and stays there. Abdoh, who created, directed and co-choreographed "Quotations," is working squarely within the stylistic frame, if not the apoliticality, of the post-modern avant-garde.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1992 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Brash and brainy young director Reza Abdoh is joining forces with venerable basso Jerome Hines for the Long Beach Opera's highly stylized new production of Giuseppe Verdi's "Simon Boccanegra" with performances Sunday and Wednesday. The 30-ish Abdoh is best known for his violent, erotic and highly politicized spectacles, and the 70-ish Hines is one of opera's best-traveled artists, a veteran of the world's major stages. The director is making his opera debut.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1992 | RICHARD STAYTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Southern Californians have witnessed Reza Abdoh's in-your-face assaultive style at the defunct Los Angeles Theatre Center. Now in "The Law of Remains," New Yorkers are confronting a similar experience. Saturday night, Abdoh mooned Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1991
I do not know and have never met Reza Abdoh, but I would venture to say that he has a good deal of anger on certain issues, based on reading "Theater on the Edge" (Aug. 25) and viewing a performance of "Bogeyman." Based on letters in The Times (Sept. 8) and a Counterpunch piece the next day, I'd say the authors of those pieces also have some real anger. Personally, I find nothing wrong or offensive about anger: It can be protecting, inspiring and even funny. I do, however, find offensive ignorance, arrogance and intolerance.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Abdoh's Next Date: Reza Abdoh, creator of the controversial "Bogeyman" now playing at the Los Angeles Theatre Center, will unveil his newest work, "The Law of Remains," Jan. 27 in a former New York porno movie theater on 42nd Street. Based on the Egyptian Book of the Dead, the show marks the first New York production of Abdoh's Dar A Luz performance works company and will include several actors from the "Bogeyman" cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1991
Regarding "Theater on the Edge," Richard Stayton's profile of playwright-director Reza Abdoh (Aug. 25): I am a supporter of the Los Angeles Theatre Center and have held season tickets off and on since its first year. Over the years I've been to performances that have brought me out of my seat--sometimes to cheer and sometimes to leave. I've been excited, challenged, insulted and bored. But now I'm scared. The kind of attitude that Abdoh has will lead to more desertions, not simply by the politicians but by LATC supporters.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
There was a time when Reza Abdoh was into activism. Even lyricism (remember "Rusty Sat on a Hill One Dawn and Watched the Moon Go Down"?). But the balance started to shift last year with "The Hip-Hop Waltz of Eurydice." A stridency pierced the work like a knife. Now the mood has tilted--plunged or soared, depending on the point of view.
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