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NATIONAL
May 28, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
You can't run in the hallways. Now you can't hide in them, either. The Northside Independent School District in San Antonio, Texas, will embark on an experimental project next year to track thousands of students at two schools by putting scanner chips in their ID cards.  “We want to harness the power of technology to make schools safer, know where our students are all the time in a school, and increase revenues,” district spokesman  Pascual Gonzalez  told the San Antonio Express-News . “Parents expect that we always know where their children are, and this technology will help us do that.”  Wait - “increase revenues”?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
May 28, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
You can't run in the hallways. Now you can't hide in them, either. The Northside Independent School District in San Antonio, Texas, will embark on an experimental project next year to track thousands of students at two schools by putting scanner chips in their ID cards.  “We want to harness the power of technology to make schools safer, know where our students are all the time in a school, and increase revenues,” district spokesman  Pascual Gonzalez  told the San Antonio Express-News . “Parents expect that we always know where their children are, and this technology will help us do that.”  Wait - “increase revenues”?
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BUSINESS
April 13, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Oracle Corp. and Intel Corp. said Tuesday that they would work together to develop products based on radio frequency identification, technology that uses chips emitting a radio signal to track inventory. Development teams from Oracle, the world's No. 3 software maker, and Intel, the world's largest computer chip maker, will adapt existing company products to create RFID products, Redwood City, Calif.-based Oracle said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2007 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Tackling a dilemma right out of a science fiction novel, the state Senate passed legislation Thursday that would bar employers from requiring workers to have identification devices implanted under their skin. State Sen. Joe Simitian (D-Palo Alto) proposed the measure after at least one company began marketing radio frequency identification devices for use in humans. The devices, as small as a grain of rice, can be used by employers to identify workers.
OPINION
August 23, 2005
IT SEEMS ODD for a legislator from Silicon Valley to be pushing for unprecedented restrictions on a new technology. But that's what Sen. Joe Simitian (D-Palo Alto) is trying to do in the arena of government-issued identity cards, much to the chagrin of some constituents. At issue is an emerging technique for embedding personal information into driver's licenses, library cards and other government-issued IDs.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2008 | DAVID LAZARUS
You might not know it, but as of January it became illegal in California for companies to require workers to have devices implanted under their skin that would reveal their whereabouts at all times. State Sen. Joe Simitian (D-Palo Alto) called his legislation a safeguard against "the ultimate invasion of privacy." Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed the bill into law in October. But your privacy may not be completely safe.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2004 | Debora Vrana, Times Staff Writer
Inside a nondescript, low-rise office building across the street from a gravel pit in Irwindale, a scientist in a white lab coat is making a high-tech trip to the grocery store. In his basket are familiar items: Total cereal, white-corn taco shells, facial tissue, Triscuits. But he doesn't go through a typical checkout process. As he carries his basket past black scanners that look like flat stereo speakers, the bill appears on a nearby computer screen, detailing the cost of each item.
TRAVEL
October 14, 2007 | Terry Gardner, Special to The Times
If you flew in July, chances were greater this year than last that your bag didn't make the trip with you. Department of Transportation statistics showed that nearly eight of every 1,000 passengers in the U.S. arrived at their destination without the luggage they started with. That was up from about 6 1/2 passengers (and how we pity you half-passengers) the previous July. But lost (or, more correctly, mishandled) luggage may one day be a thing of the past, thanks to an evolving technology.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2006
* Pasadena-based label maker Avery Dennison Corp. said it had acquired RF Identics for $15 million. The Grand Rapids, Mich.-based company provides radio frequency identification (RFID) technology. * * Biolase Technology Inc., a medical device maker, said it had received a warning letter from U.S. regulators after an August inspection of the company's Irvine plant.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Label maker Avery Dennison Corp. sued Japanese rival Toray International Inc. over chips embedded in clothing and other products to manage supplies and cut down on shoplifting. Pasadena-based Avery alleges that Toray's chips infringe a patent it owns for radio-frequency identification devices. Avery also said it inked a pact to supply RFID chips to Motorola Inc.
SCIENCE
December 13, 2008 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Utah researchers have developed a car key that can prevent teens from talking on their cellphones while driving, the university said Thursday. Connected through Bluetooth or RFID technologies, when the key is inserted in the ignition, it sends a signal deactivating the phone. About 10% of teenagers are thought to be talking or texting while driving, and such activities quadruple the risk of an accident. The device could be available in about six months at a cost of $50 plus a monthly service fee.
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