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NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By David A. Keeps
Kelly Wearstler is always up for a challenge. After establishing herself as one of the nation's leading interior designers, she followed up her high-voltage interiors, furniture and home accessories with a signature clothing collection. “Designing ready-to-wear clothing was the hardest thing I've ever attempted,” Wearstler said. “Learning fashion is like speaking another language.” Now comes “Rhapsody,” Wearstler's fourth book, to be published Oct. 23 by Rizzoli.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Streaming music pioneer Rhapsody, one of the first digital music companies to offer access to songs through monthly subscriptions, has cut its staff by 15%. Also, its president, Jon Irwin, is stepping down and will continue as a strategic advisor.  Rhapsody International, the service's parent, said Monday that the layoffs were concurrent with New York investment firm Columbus Nova Technology Partners' taking a large share in the company....
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NEWS
January 13, 2004
"Grasping for Air," as all of John Balzar's writing about sailing, was informative and delightful. For thousands of years, courageous men of iron have sailed ships of wood. The celebration of sailing remains a spiritual, historical and satisfying experience. Rob George Hermosa Beach
BUSINESS
May 16, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc. upended the Internet with its search engine. It launched its own email service, made roads and highways easier to navigate, developed the world's most popular operating system for mobile devices and took a shot at Apple Inc.'s iTunes with its own Google Play store. Now the technology giant is cranking up the volume with the debut of a subscription music service that provides access to millions of songs for a monthly fee, taking on the likes of Spotify and Pandora and going after the next big wave in digital music: streaming on mobile devices.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1997 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF
Rhapsody in Taps, a locally based company celebrating its 15th anniversary season, may be the Betty Crocker of the tap world: The group is deadly wholesome, gooily homogenized, and seemed to require very little cooking to elicit cheers from the sold-out audience at Robert B. Moore Theatre at Orange Coast College on Saturday night.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
RealNetworks Inc.'s subscription music service Rhapsody has been approved for use on iPhones and iPod Touches, the first time that Apple Inc. has allowed an on-demand music streaming program on its devices in the U.S. The initial download will be free, but new subscribers will have to pay $14.99 a month if they want to try it for longer than seven days.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2010 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
As Brian Wilson remembers it, the head Beach Boy was still a beach toddler the first time he heard George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue," a piece of music that would have a profound effect on the rest of his life. "I was 2 years old," Wilson, 68, said recently while seated on the couch in the living room at his Beverly Hills home, his voice carrying the enthusiasm of a discovery made last week. "My mother played it for me, and she said I turned my head like this [cocking his head to the left]
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2001
Despite two recent films about adoption, a very sensitive subject, filmmakers and reviewers insensitively insult those who adopt or are adopted. In "A.I. Artificial Intelligence," David hears that he is not the "real son" of his adoptive parents. In his review of "An American Rhapsody," ("A Broken Childhood in 'American Rhapsody,' " Aug. 10), Kenneth Turan refers to Suzanne's birth parents as "natural parents," as if to imply that adoption is an unnatural act. Let the word go forth that the correct terminology is to distinguish birth parents from adoptive parents, birth children from adoptive children, and that there is nothing more natural and humane than for parents to adopt children and love them as very special.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1990
As one who has studied with many of our greatest tap masters at tap festivals across the country, I was upset by Cathy Curtis' review of Rhapsody in Taps ("Rhapsody in Taps Performs Hines Work at Japan America," Oct. 29). The review was an example of one of tap-dancers' major concerns now--the problem being that tap is not critiqued as an art form. Seldom are choreographic style, rhythmic accuracy and interest, musicality or technical ability mentioned; costume and body type are always discussed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Student Honors: Two USC students have won College Television Awards from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. They and other winners each received a $2,000 prize Sunday in ceremonies in Beverly Hills. David Mackay of USC was one of three winners in the entertainment division. He won for the drama "Providence." Also selected were Cheng Long of Temple University for the musical "Rhapsody" and Skip Martin of Florida State University for the comedy "The Making of Killer Kite."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2013 | By Daniel Miller, Los Angeles Times
Fay Kanin, an Oscar-nominated screenwriter for the 1958 Clark Gable-Doris Day comedy "Teacher's Pet" and former president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, died Wednesday. She was 95. In a writing career that spanned more than four decades, Kanin penned screenplays for movies such as the 1954 Elizabeth Taylor romantic drama "Rhapsody" and television specials such as "Tell Me Where It Hurts," for which she won two Emmy Awards in 1974. She won another Emmy in 1979 for producing "Friendly Fire," a critically acclaimed Carol Burnett TV movie based on the true story of an American soldier killed in the Vietnam War. Kanin served as president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences from 1979 to 1983, and was its second female president after actress Bette Davis.
NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By David A. Keeps
Kelly Wearstler is always up for a challenge. After establishing herself as one of the nation's leading interior designers, she followed up her high-voltage interiors, furniture and home accessories with a signature clothing collection. “Designing ready-to-wear clothing was the hardest thing I've ever attempted,” Wearstler said. “Learning fashion is like speaking another language.” Now comes “Rhapsody,” Wearstler's fourth book, to be published Oct. 23 by Rizzoli.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
I am sitting on a couch facing two turntables, a DJ mixer, a dual-drive CD player/recorder, a cassette deck and a wireless two-terrabyte hard drive half full of music - all in one way or another plugged into my sound system. The various components live in service of the thousands of LPs and 45s on shelves spread throughout my home, which I love, and the 3,000 CDs stored in containers in a closet that I'm reasonably ambivalent about but haven't figured out what to do with. They're near a tub full of tapes that I once tried to throw away but retrieved from the dumpster a few hours later and the MP3s on the hard drive, which I used to access way more than I do now and have no emotional attachment to whatsoever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2012 | By Jason Kehe
Robert Shaw, a piano teacher and former punk-rock musician, spent years telling his friends that Los Angeles was not a piano-friendly town. If a club or restaurant owned a piano -  a rarity to begin with -  they were just dormant keyboards. Opportunities to jam in public with friends were few. So when his girlfriend walked him down to the Santa Monica Pier one April day, where a colorful piano was sitting in the open for anyone to play, Shaw experienced a bit of heaven. He rushed over and performed “Rhapsody in Blue,” attracting a small crowd in the process.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2011
A pair of new Blu-ray releases might make the perfect gifts for the cinephile on your list. Gary Cooper, Fredric March and Miriam Hopkins star in Ernst Lubitsch's "Design for Living," a pre-code comedy adapted from Noel Coward's play "Brief Encounter. " The 1933 classic centers on a beautiful commercial artist courted by a dashing painter (Cooper) and a dashing playwright (March) that she meets on a train trip to Paris. Another train-centered film fan favorite, Alfred Hitchcock's 1938 comic thriller "The Lady Vanishes," stars Margaret Lockwood as a woman traveling across Europe when she encounters a spinster (Dame May Whitty)
BUSINESS
October 4, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Best Buy Co. has given up on the increasingly crowded digital music market, selling its struggling Napster online music service to competitor Rhapsody in exchange for a minority stake in the combined company. The deal comes three years after Best Buy paid $121 million to acquire Napster Inc., the first wildly popular source of Internet piracy that morphed into a legitimate paid music service. It gives Rhapsody more power to compete against hot digital music upstarts such as Spotify, MOG and Rdio.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
I am sitting on a couch facing two turntables, a DJ mixer, a dual-drive CD player/recorder, a cassette deck and a wireless two-terrabyte hard drive half full of music - all in one way or another plugged into my sound system. The various components live in service of the thousands of LPs and 45s on shelves spread throughout my home, which I love, and the 3,000 CDs stored in containers in a closet that I'm reasonably ambivalent about but haven't figured out what to do with. They're near a tub full of tapes that I once tried to throw away but retrieved from the dumpster a few hours later and the MP3s on the hard drive, which I used to access way more than I do now and have no emotional attachment to whatsoever.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
Ending an 18-month tour that began in New York last year, and has touched down in, among other places, Rome, Washington and Long Island, conductor Maurice Peress, pianist Ivan Davis and an ad hoc orchestra bring "Paul Whiteman's Historic Aeolian Hall Concert" to Ambassador Auditorium in Pasadena tonight and Wednesday. The program is a musical re-creation of the concert in New York City on Feb.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2011 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
When Scott Riggs took his first commercial radio DJ job in 1995, he was handed a list of songs and told never to veer from it. "It was a shock," said Riggs, who soon learned that DJs rarely get to choose the music at broadcast stations, where playlists are dictated by top 40 hits. "I wanted to be the guy who played a new song that blew someone's mind and turned them on to great music. " Today Riggs, 41, gets to do just that. As director of music programming at the San Diego online music service Slacker Inc., Riggs oversees about 70 DJs who select most of the songs played on the company's 150 stations, including genres as varied as trance, hip-hop, gospel and swing.
OPINION
February 19, 2011
As CD sales plummeted, music executives looked in hope toward a new business model: Instead of trying to sell albums for $15 to $20 apiece, offer unlimited access to songs online for a flat monthly fee. The idea, however, has yet to catch on with the masses of music fans. The main impediment for many years was that subscribers couldn't use the services on the MP3 players that most of them owned, Apple's iPods. Now, with iPods giving way to iPhones and other mobile devices that support subscription services, Apple is putting a new hurdle in their path: It's trying to grab a huge chunk of the subscription revenue.
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