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Rheedlen Centers For Children And Families

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July 2, 1995 | Jabari Asim, Jabari Asim's fiction appears in the recently published book "Brotherman: The Odyssey of Black Men in America" (Ballantine). He is an arts writer at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch
My son is nearly 12, and literally looming large. His brown limbs have lengthened and grown sinewy; his "baby fat" has shape-shifted into dark, lean strips of muscle. Many things about him suggest that he is almost a man: His voice changes without warning from a shrill whisper to a husky drawl. His walk, once hesitant and childish, is now a rhythmic, leonine strut. Various prohibitions must accompany his transformation. Don't wander far from the porch, I tell him: Stay out front where I can see you. If your mother sends you to the store, come right back.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1998 | NONA YATES
Children's advocates will meet in Los Angeles next week for two national assemblies: a two-day Episcopal gathering, "Our Church's Voice for Children," and the 25th annual Children's Defense Fund conference. Marian Wright Edelman, Children's Defense Fund founder and president, will be honored at the Episcopalian event Tuesday afternoon. She will deliver the keynote address to the group Wednesday morning, discussing ways that the church can increase its role in protecting and nurturing children.
NEWS
September 26, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
" Jun Bi! " The voice barks the "ready" command in Korean, and several dozen small bodies stiffen, their arms straight out at a slight downward angle, hands in fists, bare feet apart, toes up. The line is resplendent in white, the bleached brightness of each gi punctuated only by a sash of color at the waist. Belt colors denote rank: the higher-level browns stand in the most honored place at the far right end of the line. Beginners, all in white, are to the left.
NEWS
March 6, 1998 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The big map of Harlem was mounted like a battle plan, an appropriate display, since the mission was a war on despair. The map divided the poor, drug-ridden area into three zones, and on one corner, a circle marked the building where the Rheedlen Centers for Children and Families hopes to relocate. The only problem was, the CEO heard his staff report, the place has no roof. OK, he said, we'll build a roof. And by the way, the staff continued, all the floors fell in.
NEWS
April 12, 1996 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She is a California golden girl, swimsuit-model slender and supremely self-assured. Her eyes are the icy blue of a mountain lake on a cool, cloudless day. Her hair is tawny, pulled back with a scrunchie in the haphazard high fashion of adolescence. The pearly pink polish on her nails is a shade a younger girl might have chosen, probably the only choice there at the San Francisco juvenile detention center. Penny is 16 and doing time for murder, 25 years to life.
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