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Rhett Butler

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1988
To paraphrase Rhett Butler: Frankly, fundamentalists, I don't give a damn what you think. JOSEPH ZICHERMAN Carpenteria
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Cammie King Conlon, who jokingly lamented that she was famous for an experience she barely remembered, portraying Scarlett O'Hara and Rhett Butler's ill-fated young daughter in the film "Gone With the Wind," has died. She was 76. Conlon, whose brief movie-acting career included voicing the fawn Faline in "Bambi," died Wednesday of cancer at her home in Ft. Bragg, Calif., said Bruce Lewis, a friend. At 4, she was cast as Bonnie Blue Butler for her resemblance to her film-screen parents — Vivien Leigh and Clark Gable — but her memories of making the epic 1939 Civil War saga were vague, more like "snapshots," she often said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1986
Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep, the "dream team" to play Rhett Butler and Scarlett O'Hara in a "Gone With the Wind" sequel? Why not Danny DeVito and Bette Midler, John Travolta and Oliva Newton-John or, better yet, Sean Penn and Madonna? Get real! No wonder nobody goes to the movies anymore. IVY FRADIN Sherman Oaks
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hazel Warp, 93, who was Vivien Leigh's stunt double in "Gone With the Wind," died Tuesday at Livingston Memorial Hospital in Livingston, Mont. A cause of death was not released. Warp, who rode and trained horses, did the horseback riding scenes for Leigh in the 1939 movie. She also took a fall for Leigh, tumbling down the stairs of Tara in the famous scene near the end of the film when Scarlett O'Hara reaches out to slap Rhett Butler, loses her balance and falls. "I never will forget it," Warp said of her Hollywood work in a 2005 interview with the Bozeman (Mont.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1989 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Charge It With GWTW: Scarlett O'Hara's line in the classic "Gone With the Wind"--"Rhett, you never give me credit for anything"--may no longer hold true. To mark the 50th anniversary of the legendary movie and the eve of its re-premiere, Rhett Butler is finally "giving credit"--with a Gone With the Wind MasterCard. Issued by the Citizens and Southern National Bank in Atlanta, the cards will be reissued every two years with a different scene reproduced from movie stills.
NEWS
July 25, 1996 | EDITH STANLEY
When Mark White, 26, an Atlanta real estate analyst, went to a recent Olympic event, he was surprised to see a man he described as a double of Clark Gable's "Gone With the Wind" character, Rhett Butler. Near this Rhett look-alike was a box filled with small plastic bags of red Georgia clay. White, thinking the bags were free to Olympic visitors, picked one up and started to walk away with it, only to be caught from behind by the handsome Rhett Butler. "That will be $5," the man demanded.
NEWS
February 1, 1998 | Kevin Thomas
Here's a chance to see, minus commercials and segmenting, the most beloved American movie of them all. The glorious 1939 David O. Selznick production of Margaret Mitchell's Civil War novel has a perfect cast, headed by Vivien Leigh (pictured) as Scarlett O'Hara and Clark Gable (pictured) as Rhett Butler, with Olivia De Haviland and Leslie Howard and a cast of thousands. Directed (largely) by Victor Fleming, with key contributions by George Cukor.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1998 | Susan King
Not only has "Titanic" fever swept the universe, James Cameron's epic dominated the Oscar nominations with 14. Fifty-eight years ago, audiences were equally fanatic about "Gone With the Wind" and couldn't get enough of the tumultuous romance between Rhett Butler (Clark Gable) and Scarlett O'Hara (Vivien Leigh). Nominated for a then-record 13 Oscars, David O.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hazel Warp, 93, who was Vivien Leigh's stunt double in "Gone With the Wind," died Tuesday at Livingston Memorial Hospital in Livingston, Mont. A cause of death was not released. Warp, who rode and trained horses, did the horseback riding scenes for Leigh in the 1939 movie. She also took a fall for Leigh, tumbling down the stairs of Tara in the famous scene near the end of the film when Scarlett O'Hara reaches out to slap Rhett Butler, loses her balance and falls. "I never will forget it," Warp said of her Hollywood work in a 2005 interview with the Bozeman (Mont.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The London critics came, they saw, and frankly, my dear, most were unmoved by a new musical adaptation of "Gone With the Wind." Critics played on Rhett Butler's famous exit line to Scarlett O'Hara: "Frankly, it's hard to give a damn about this Wind," said the headline in Wednesday's Daily Express about the show that opened Tuesday at the West End's New London Theatre. The Times' Benedict Nightingale was gentler. "I did give a damn," he wrote. "But not as big a damn as I had hoped."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The London critics came, they saw, and frankly, my dear, most were unmoved by a new musical adaptation of "Gone With the Wind." Critics played on Rhett Butler's famous exit line to Scarlett O'Hara: "Frankly, it's hard to give a damn about this Wind," said the headline in Wednesday's Daily Express about the show that opened Tuesday at the West End's New London Theatre. The Times' Benedict Nightingale was gentler. "I did give a damn," he wrote. "But not as big a damn as I had hoped."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2007 | Linton Weeks, Washington Post
HIGHLAND COUNTY, Va. -- Donald McCaig has to make sure that the fences are mended so his sheep don't stray, that his border collies are tucked away in a kennel, that his Pyrenees guard dogs are being looked after and that the leftover venison from supper has been disposed of before he leaves his beloved farm for a 30-day tour to promote "Rhett Butler's People," the new sort-of-a-sequel to "Gone With the Wind."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1999 | STEVE HARVEY
Even Rhett Butler would give a darn about this. Discussing literature in his book "The Princess & The Package," publicist Michael Levine refers to "Ibsen's Nora, Puzo's Michael Corleone, Pasternak's Zhivago, Mead's Scarlett O'Hara . . . ." Whoa! Wrong Margaret there, Michael. Anthropologist Margaret Mead was the author of "Coming of Age in Samoa" and several other books. Margaret Mitchell, who wrote "Gone With the Wind," was closer to Savannah than Samoa.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Forget "Titanic." (As if.) With an adjusted domestic gross estimated by Variety at $1.2 billion, roughly twice what the James Cameron film has managed within this country, "Gone With the Wind" is without serious rivals as America's most popular film. And it's back. Starting Friday, "Gone With the Wind" will be seen in three dozen Southern California theaters, 200-plus nationwide. The film has been periodically re-released since its 1939 debut, the last time in 1989, but this version is special.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1998 | Susan King
Not only has "Titanic" fever swept the universe, James Cameron's epic dominated the Oscar nominations with 14. Fifty-eight years ago, audiences were equally fanatic about "Gone With the Wind" and couldn't get enough of the tumultuous romance between Rhett Butler (Clark Gable) and Scarlett O'Hara (Vivien Leigh). Nominated for a then-record 13 Oscars, David O.
NEWS
February 1, 1998 | Kevin Thomas
Here's a chance to see, minus commercials and segmenting, the most beloved American movie of them all. The glorious 1939 David O. Selznick production of Margaret Mitchell's Civil War novel has a perfect cast, headed by Vivien Leigh (pictured) as Scarlett O'Hara and Clark Gable (pictured) as Rhett Butler, with Olivia De Haviland and Leslie Howard and a cast of thousands. Directed (largely) by Victor Fleming, with key contributions by George Cukor.
NEWS
April 4, 1989 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
Even though "Gone With the Wind" was a work of fiction, a historian believes there is a lot of fact in the character of Rhett Butler. E. Lee Spence, who writes about treasure hunting, believes Butler was based in part on George Alfred Trenholm, a wealthy Charleston, S.C., businessman. Spence, president of Shipwreck Consultants on Sullivan's Island near Charleston, said that in 1967 he recovered needles, pins and buttons from the blockade runner Georgiana, which sank in 1863.
NEWS
July 25, 1996 | EDITH STANLEY
When Mark White, 26, an Atlanta real estate analyst, went to a recent Olympic event, he was surprised to see a man he described as a double of Clark Gable's "Gone With the Wind" character, Rhett Butler. Near this Rhett look-alike was a box filled with small plastic bags of red Georgia clay. White, thinking the bags were free to Olympic visitors, picked one up and started to walk away with it, only to be caught from behind by the handsome Rhett Butler. "That will be $5," the man demanded.
NEWS
November 13, 1994 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Timothy Dalton really doesn't know why he takes risks. "I often say I like a challenge, but I begin to wonder where you draw the line between a healthy creative challenge and something that is potentially self-destructive," acknowledges the 48-year-old Welsh actor. "Whether it becomes about ... can I survive it? Or can I, against all odds, be good? One wonders. I'm not quite sure where the line is between something that's perverse and masochistic and what's challenging.
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