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Rheumatic Fever

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1989 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rheumatic fever, which had all but vanished in this country, could be making a comeback, doctors said Thursday. Outbreaks among children and adults "suggest the potential for resurgence of this illness," according to a report published by San Diego researchers in this week's Journal of the American Medical Assn. Rheumatic fever, still common in developing countries, is caused by strep throat, or Group A streptococcus.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1998 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 10-year-old boy's imagination can soar, especially when he's left at home alone, in bed. Kestutis Nakas re-creates that period of his life in "Rheumatic Fever: A Love Story," a solo performance seen over the weekend at Highways. Nakas, the son of Lithuanian emigres who settled in Mesa, a suburb southeast of Phoenix, was 10 when President Kennedy was shot.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
Rheumatic fever appears to be making a strong comeback among children in several U.S. cities, and an expert attributes that to the emergence of dangerous strains of sore throat bacteria. The outbreaks of rheumatic fever--which is caused by group A streptococcus bacteria, the germs responsible for strep throat--follow decades of steady decline.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | DR. DEBORAH FRIEDMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS; Dr. Deborah Friedman is associate professor of clinical pediatrics at New York University Medical Center. and
For the past few years rheumatic fever has been on the rise, triggered by a common infection: strep throat. Millions of children get streptococcal bacterial infections of the throat each year, but only a few will go on to develop rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever usually strikes children between the ages of 5 and 15. But it only occurs in people who are susceptible to what is called an "autoimmune" reaction by the body which is triggered by the strep bacteria.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
A recent outbreak of rheumatic fever in Utah demonstrates that the disease "remains an important threat" in the United States, despite a dramatic decline in the number of cases over the last 30 years, doctors warned. Researchers at the University of Utah Medical School said their findings show vigilance is still needed to combat the disease, which usually develops in children with strep throat and can cause life-threatening heart disorders. "Rheumatic fever is still a problem," Dr. Herbert D.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | DR. DEBORAH FRIEDMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS; Dr. Deborah Friedman is associate professor of clinical pediatrics at New York University Medical Center. and
For the past few years rheumatic fever has been on the rise, triggered by a common infection: strep throat. Millions of children get streptococcal bacterial infections of the throat each year, but only a few will go on to develop rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever usually strikes children between the ages of 5 and 15. But it only occurs in people who are susceptible to what is called an "autoimmune" reaction by the body which is triggered by the strep bacteria.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1998 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 10-year-old boy's imagination can soar, especially when he's left at home alone, in bed. Kestutis Nakas re-creates that period of his life in "Rheumatic Fever: A Love Story," a solo performance seen over the weekend at Highways. Nakas, the son of Lithuanian emigres who settled in Mesa, a suburb southeast of Phoenix, was 10 when President Kennedy was shot.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A 12-year-old girl abducted by her mother from a Chicago hospital two weeks ago underwent the heart surgery that her mother, a Jehovah's Witness, had objected to on religious grounds. Kimberly Winfield was in critical but stable condition after open heart surgery to correct damage she suffered from rheumatic fever five years ago, doctors at Children's Memorial Hospital said. Caroline Winfield, a 35-year-old homeless woman, abducted the girl from the hospital on May 10.
NEWS
February 14, 1985
Edmund L. Dubois, founder and director of the Lupus Clinic at County-USC Medical Center and an international authority on that mysterious ailment, died Feb. 2 after a seven-year struggle with cancer. Dubois, 61, a rheumatologist, founded what is believed to be the nation's first lupus clinic while in private practice in Beverly Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
You name it, Donald Sutherland has had it. Polio, rheumatic fever, hepatitis, an appendectomy, pneumonia, scarlet fever. "And spinal meningitis," the actor said. "I died. . . . " A reporter chuckled. Sutherland looked perturbed. "Yes. I died. For four or five seconds," he said. Sutherland overcame the bout of meningitis and says his experience with disease since childhood left him with a deep appreciation of the medical profession.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1989 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rheumatic fever, which had all but vanished in this country, could be making a comeback, doctors said Thursday. Outbreaks among children and adults "suggest the potential for resurgence of this illness," according to a report published by San Diego researchers in this week's Journal of the American Medical Assn. Rheumatic fever, still common in developing countries, is caused by strep throat, or Group A streptococcus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
Rheumatic fever appears to be making a strong comeback among children in several U.S. cities, and an expert attributes that to the emergence of dangerous strains of sore throat bacteria. The outbreaks of rheumatic fever--which is caused by group A streptococcus bacteria, the germs responsible for strep throat--follow decades of steady decline.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
A recent outbreak of rheumatic fever in Utah demonstrates that the disease "remains an important threat" in the United States, despite a dramatic decline in the number of cases over the last 30 years, doctors warned. Researchers at the University of Utah Medical School said their findings show vigilance is still needed to combat the disease, which usually develops in children with strep throat and can cause life-threatening heart disorders. "Rheumatic fever is still a problem," Dr. Herbert D.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | LEO SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Strep throat--a little infection with a nasty reputation. As children, we hear stories about it, how it starts out simply enough, with symptoms common to a cold, but can end up being something much worse. Because we are so young, we don't fully understand. As adults, many of us still don't have a full handle on strep. "I don't want to cause panic," said Dr. Chris Landon, head of the Pediatric Diagnostic Clinic at Ventura County Medical Center. "But we need to worry more about strep throat."
HEALTH
March 16, 2009 | Amber Dance, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Former First Lady Barbara Bush and actor-comedian Robin Williams this month joined the thousands of Americans who have come to need an artificial valve implanted to regulate the blood flow out of the heart to supply the rest of the body. Bush, 83, had aortic valve replacement surgery March 4 after experiencing shortness of breath and being diagnosed with a hardened valve. Williams, 57, announced March 5 that he would postpone his 80-city "Weapons of Self-Destruction" tour for the same surgery after having similar symptoms and a faulty-heart valve diagnosis.
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