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Rheumatism

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WORLD
September 9, 2011 | By Kate Lamb, Los Angeles Times
Each afternoon, Abdul Rachman indulges in his favorite way to reduce the stresses of the working world: He sits on the railway tracks not far from home. Rachman, a 32-year-old security guard, says the unorthodox practice is intended to prolong his life, not end it. "Many people say I want to kill myself because I do this," said the stocky man with a thick mustache, who has suffered from rheumatism and fatigue. "People can say what they want. I do it because I want to be cured. " Rachman is among scores of advocates of railway "electric therapy," a treatment some Indonesians believe cures such ailments as strokes, asthma, high blood pressure and rheumatism, not to mention a hard day at the office.
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WORLD
September 9, 2011 | By Kate Lamb, Los Angeles Times
Each afternoon, Abdul Rachman indulges in his favorite way to reduce the stresses of the working world: He sits on the railway tracks not far from home. Rachman, a 32-year-old security guard, says the unorthodox practice is intended to prolong his life, not end it. "Many people say I want to kill myself because I do this," said the stocky man with a thick mustache, who has suffered from rheumatism and fatigue. "People can say what they want. I do it because I want to be cured. " Rachman is among scores of advocates of railway "electric therapy," a treatment some Indonesians believe cures such ailments as strokes, asthma, high blood pressure and rheumatism, not to mention a hard day at the office.
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NEWS
January 20, 1992 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Dr. Steven R. Weiner was at UCLA in 1982 when he saw the first patient, the one who stood out "like a bright red light." The 32-year-old woman had had silicone gel implants placed in her breasts in 1976. Now, she had a painful, swollen left elbow, and a large lymph node in her left armpit appeared to contain silicone. Her muscle and joint pains did not respond to anti-inflammation medications and steroid injections. The whole case could not be explained by any known rheumatic disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1998 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 10-year-old boy's imagination can soar, especially when he's left at home alone, in bed. Kestutis Nakas re-creates that period of his life in "Rheumatic Fever: A Love Story," a solo performance seen over the weekend at Highways. Nakas, the son of Lithuanian emigres who settled in Mesa, a suburb southeast of Phoenix, was 10 when President Kennedy was shot.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1998 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 10-year-old boy's imagination can soar, especially when he's left at home alone, in bed. Kestutis Nakas re-creates that period of his life in "Rheumatic Fever: A Love Story," a solo performance seen over the weekend at Highways. Nakas, the son of Lithuanian emigres who settled in Mesa, a suburb southeast of Phoenix, was 10 when President Kennedy was shot.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | From Reuters
Elderly people in the south Chinese city of Canton are swinging to pop music to relieve aches and pains on the advice of doctors who say disco dancing can help ease rheumatism, according to a Chinese newspaper. The Nanfang Ribao, published in Canton, said a hospital organized disco classes this week as part of a therapy program. More than 300 people, most of them in their 60s and 70s, joined the class on the first day, the paper said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1989 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rheumatic fever, which had all but vanished in this country, could be making a comeback, doctors said Thursday. Outbreaks among children and adults "suggest the potential for resurgence of this illness," according to a report published by San Diego researchers in this week's Journal of the American Medical Assn. Rheumatic fever, still common in developing countries, is caused by strep throat, or Group A streptococcus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
Rheumatic fever appears to be making a strong comeback among children in several U.S. cities, and an expert attributes that to the emergence of dangerous strains of sore throat bacteria. The outbreaks of rheumatic fever--which is caused by group A streptococcus bacteria, the germs responsible for strep throat--follow decades of steady decline.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
A recent outbreak of rheumatic fever in Utah demonstrates that the disease "remains an important threat" in the United States, despite a dramatic decline in the number of cases over the last 30 years, doctors warned. Researchers at the University of Utah Medical School said their findings show vigilance is still needed to combat the disease, which usually develops in children with strep throat and can cause life-threatening heart disorders. "Rheumatic fever is still a problem," Dr. Herbert D.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | DR. DEBORAH FRIEDMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS; Dr. Deborah Friedman is associate professor of clinical pediatrics at New York University Medical Center. and
For the past few years rheumatic fever has been on the rise, triggered by a common infection: strep throat. Millions of children get streptococcal bacterial infections of the throat each year, but only a few will go on to develop rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever usually strikes children between the ages of 5 and 15. But it only occurs in people who are susceptible to what is called an "autoimmune" reaction by the body which is triggered by the strep bacteria.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | DR. DEBORAH FRIEDMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS; Dr. Deborah Friedman is associate professor of clinical pediatrics at New York University Medical Center. and
For the past few years rheumatic fever has been on the rise, triggered by a common infection: strep throat. Millions of children get streptococcal bacterial infections of the throat each year, but only a few will go on to develop rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever usually strikes children between the ages of 5 and 15. But it only occurs in people who are susceptible to what is called an "autoimmune" reaction by the body which is triggered by the strep bacteria.
NEWS
January 20, 1992 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Dr. Steven R. Weiner was at UCLA in 1982 when he saw the first patient, the one who stood out "like a bright red light." The 32-year-old woman had had silicone gel implants placed in her breasts in 1976. Now, she had a painful, swollen left elbow, and a large lymph node in her left armpit appeared to contain silicone. Her muscle and joint pains did not respond to anti-inflammation medications and steroid injections. The whole case could not be explained by any known rheumatic disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1989 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rheumatic fever, which had all but vanished in this country, could be making a comeback, doctors said Thursday. Outbreaks among children and adults "suggest the potential for resurgence of this illness," according to a report published by San Diego researchers in this week's Journal of the American Medical Assn. Rheumatic fever, still common in developing countries, is caused by strep throat, or Group A streptococcus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
Rheumatic fever appears to be making a strong comeback among children in several U.S. cities, and an expert attributes that to the emergence of dangerous strains of sore throat bacteria. The outbreaks of rheumatic fever--which is caused by group A streptococcus bacteria, the germs responsible for strep throat--follow decades of steady decline.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
A recent outbreak of rheumatic fever in Utah demonstrates that the disease "remains an important threat" in the United States, despite a dramatic decline in the number of cases over the last 30 years, doctors warned. Researchers at the University of Utah Medical School said their findings show vigilance is still needed to combat the disease, which usually develops in children with strep throat and can cause life-threatening heart disorders. "Rheumatic fever is still a problem," Dr. Herbert D.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | From Reuters
Elderly people in the south Chinese city of Canton are swinging to pop music to relieve aches and pains on the advice of doctors who say disco dancing can help ease rheumatism, according to a Chinese newspaper. The Nanfang Ribao, published in Canton, said a hospital organized disco classes this week as part of a therapy program. More than 300 people, most of them in their 60s and 70s, joined the class on the first day, the paper said.
NEWS
May 23, 1999 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Medications banned or highly restricted in the United States because of severe, and sometimes fatal, side effects are being smuggled in from Mexico and peddled out of back-room shops across Southern California. These potentially dangerous drugs, which multinational pharmaceutical companies market in Mexico, where regulations and enforcement are less stringent, have shown up consistently in more than 70 raids over the last year of markets, dress shops and swap meets catering to Latino immigrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1995
In 1890, the San Juan Hot Springs were touted as a cure for many ills. A physician who wrote a column for the Santa Ana Standard at the time claimed that the springs, 12 miles east of San Juan Capistrano, helped relieve symptoms of "rheumatism, skin disease, trembling nerves, indigestion and melancholia." Source: "The Golden Promise, An Illustrated History of Orange County," by Pamela Hallan-Gibson
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