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Rhino Horn

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
The masterminds of an international rhinoceros horn smuggling ring pleaded guilty in a Los Angeles federal court to illegal wildlife trafficking, money laundering and tax evasion. The pleas Friday wrapped up the first phase of a nationwide crackdown on the lucrative horn trade to Asia. Vinh Chuong "Jimmy" Kha and Felix Kha, who have been jailed since their homes and import-export business in Garden Grove and Westminster were raided in February, probably face about five more years in prison under a plea agreement with federal prosecutors.
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WORLD
July 25, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Efforts to save the rhinoceros in South Africa are failing, according to a report to the government by an independent expert. The report called for radical solutions: drones to track rhino poachers; de-horning of all South African rhinos; rhino farms; and legal trade in stockpiled and farmed rhino horn that could be auctioned or traded through a South African-based bourse. Since the beginning of the year, more than 500 rhinos in the country have been killed, compared with 668 for the whole of last year.
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NEWS
October 24, 1993 | ANNIE HUANG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The haul from the day's raids on six pharmacies was meager: a snake, some slices of rhino skin and genitals from deer. No rhino horns, no tiger bones. But Taiwan's campaign to wipe out the trade relies as much on perception, Tseng Ku-feng says, and his squad's raids served their message: Using exotic animals as medicine can be risky business. In Taiwan, where Western and traditional Chinese medicine coexist, that message has become increasingly important.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2013 | By Victoria Kim
Saying she wanted to send a message against the “extremely serious” crime of trafficking in rhinoceros horns, a federal judge on Wednesday sentenced a father and son to nearly four years in prison for selling hundreds of pounds of horns highly prized in Vietnam and China as a cancer cure. Judge Christina Snyder remarked that she had traveled to Africa and personally witnessed the effects of poaching, as she sentenced Vinh Chuong "Jimmy" Kha and Felix Kha to 42 months and 46 months in prison, respectively.
NEWS
September 18, 1993
A Bhutanese princess was arrested in Taiwan on Friday, accused of trying to smuggle 22 rhinoceros horns into the island in her luggage, an airport police spokesman said. Princess Deki Wangchuck, 43, was taken into custody and police recommended to prosecutors that she be charged with smuggling and violating conservation laws. It was one of Taiwan's biggest hauls of endangered wildlife parts. If charged and convicted, she could be sentenced to up to seven years in prison.
WORLD
July 25, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Efforts to save the rhinoceros in South Africa are failing, according to a report to the government by an independent expert. The report called for radical solutions: drones to track rhino poachers; de-horning of all South African rhinos; rhino farms; and legal trade in stockpiled and farmed rhino horn that could be auctioned or traded through a South African-based bourse. Since the beginning of the year, more than 500 rhinos in the country have been killed, compared with 668 for the whole of last year.
NEWS
August 18, 1996 | KARIN DAVIES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A 5-year-old rhinoceros with a tranquilizing dart in her rump staggered through scrub brush until she fell with a thud in the dusty wash of a helicopter's blades. The rhino is a victim of her own species' survival success. She's being moved to a region less crowded with rhinos. She might lose part of her distinctive horn on the trip, but there's less danger these days that she will be killed and the horn carved into dagger handles or ground up as medicine.
NEWS
January 5, 1986 | CHARLES MITCHELL, United Press International
Machine-gun carrying poachers in search of black rhinoceros horns that fetch up to $1,900 each are slaughtering the animals before they have a chance to mate--causing a sharp drop in herd populations and endangering the species. Leading conservationists say that well-organized poacher gangs have virtually wiped out rhino populations in Sudan, the Central African Republic, Chad, Ethiopia and Uganda. Despite those warnings, devastation of the world's black rhino population has continued unabated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
Federal wildlife investigators in California and other states say they have cracked an international smuggling ring that trafficked for years in sawed-off rhinoceros horns, which fetch stratospheric prices in Vietnam and China for their supposed cancer-curing powers. More than 150 federal agents and other local enforcement officers raided homes and businesses and made several arrests in a dozen states over the weekend, including three alleged traffickers in Southern California. "By taking out this ring of rhino horn traffickers, we have shut down a major source of black market horn and dealt a serious blow to rhino horn smuggling both in the U.S. and globally," said U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe.
NEWS
December 19, 1985 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
The great Indian rhinoceros once roamed the Indian subcontinent from Afghanistan to Burma. The one-horned, three-ton beast was a favorite subject of artists in the Indus Valley civilization that flourished 4,000 years ago in what is now Pakistan. By 1908, the number of the animals had declined to barely a dozen, here in the savannas and marshes of Assam in the far northeast corner of India.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
The masterminds of an international rhinoceros horn smuggling ring pleaded guilty in a Los Angeles federal court to illegal wildlife trafficking, money laundering and tax evasion. The pleas Friday wrapped up the first phase of a nationwide crackdown on the lucrative horn trade to Asia. Vinh Chuong "Jimmy" Kha and Felix Kha, who have been jailed since their homes and import-export business in Garden Grove and Westminster were raided in February, probably face about five more years in prison under a plea agreement with federal prosecutors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
Federal wildlife investigators in California and other states say they have cracked an international smuggling ring that trafficked for years in sawed-off rhinoceros horns, which fetch stratospheric prices in Vietnam and China for their supposed cancer-curing powers. More than 150 federal agents and other local enforcement officers raided homes and businesses and made several arrests in a dozen states over the weekend, including three alleged traffickers in Southern California. "By taking out this ring of rhino horn traffickers, we have shut down a major source of black market horn and dealt a serious blow to rhino horn smuggling both in the U.S. and globally," said U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2005 | Irene Wanner, Special to The Times
"TRADITIONAL Chinese medicine is thousands of years older than its Western counterpart and founded on completely different principles," writes prolific author Richard Ellis in his latest book, "Tiger Bone and Rhino Horn."
NEWS
August 18, 1996 | KARIN DAVIES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A 5-year-old rhinoceros with a tranquilizing dart in her rump staggered through scrub brush until she fell with a thud in the dusty wash of a helicopter's blades. The rhino is a victim of her own species' survival success. She's being moved to a region less crowded with rhinos. She might lose part of her distinctive horn on the trip, but there's less danger these days that she will be killed and the horn carved into dagger handles or ground up as medicine.
NEWS
September 22, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Holding a radio directional antenna aloft, Stewart Towindo turns slowly in a circle atop a rocky ridge. He listens carefully in his earphones for the sonar-like beeps that mean his prey is near. "Over there," the ecologist says, pointing at a distant hill. His tracker and guard, Million Sibanda, shoulders an AK-47 assault rifle and leads the way. For more than an hour, they hike down rugged gulches and through an arid expanse of brown acacia and thorny scrub.
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | ANNIE HUANG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The haul from the day's raids on six pharmacies was meager: a snake, some slices of rhino skin and genitals from deer. No rhino horns, no tiger bones. But Taiwan's campaign to wipe out the trade relies as much on perception, Tseng Ku-feng says, and his squad's raids served their message: Using exotic animals as medicine can be risky business. In Taiwan, where Western and traditional Chinese medicine coexist, that message has become increasingly important.
NEWS
September 22, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Holding a radio directional antenna aloft, Stewart Towindo turns slowly in a circle atop a rocky ridge. He listens carefully in his earphones for the sonar-like beeps that mean his prey is near. "Over there," the ecologist says, pointing at a distant hill. His tracker and guard, Million Sibanda, shoulders an AK-47 assault rifle and leads the way. For more than an hour, they hike down rugged gulches and through an arid expanse of brown acacia and thorny scrub.
NEWS
September 18, 1993
A Bhutanese princess was arrested in Taiwan on Friday, accused of trying to smuggle 22 rhinoceros horns into the island in her luggage, an airport police spokesman said. Princess Deki Wangchuck, 43, was taken into custody and police recommended to prosecutors that she be charged with smuggling and violating conservation laws. It was one of Taiwan's biggest hauls of endangered wildlife parts. If charged and convicted, she could be sentenced to up to seven years in prison.
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