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Rhino Poaching

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WORLD
March 16, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon
The baby rhino, an orphan, had barely been weaned. Her horn was only a few inches long. But that didn't stop the poachers from hacking it off. David Uys, 33, had helped raise the rhino after her mother was killed by lightning. He called her Weerkind -- "orphan" in Afrikaans. He won't forget the sight of the bodies of the baby and two other rhinos, shot dead, their horns removed. "I'm not a one for talking about emotions," Uys said quietly. "But it was like seeing one of your family members dead, the brutality of it."
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WORLD
January 17, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The world's largest surviving population of white rhinos suffered its heaviest toll on record last year when poachers killed more than 1,000 of the threatened animals to feed an international market for trinkets and potions made from their horns. The South African Department of Environmental Affairs reported Friday that it had counted 1,004 rhinos killed by poachers in 2013, mostly in Kruger National Park, along the porous border with Mozambique. It was the worst year for rhinoceros poaching since the government began tracking the illegal hunting in the early 1900s, National Geographic reported.
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WORLD
January 17, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The world's largest surviving population of white rhinos suffered its heaviest toll on record last year when poachers killed more than 1,000 of the threatened animals to feed an international market for trinkets and potions made from their horns. The South African Department of Environmental Affairs reported Friday that it had counted 1,004 rhinos killed by poachers in 2013, mostly in Kruger National Park, along the porous border with Mozambique. It was the worst year for rhinoceros poaching since the government began tracking the illegal hunting in the early 1900s, National Geographic reported.
WORLD
March 16, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon
The baby rhino, an orphan, had barely been weaned. Her horn was only a few inches long. But that didn't stop the poachers from hacking it off. David Uys, 33, had helped raise the rhino after her mother was killed by lightning. He called her Weerkind -- "orphan" in Afrikaans. He won't forget the sight of the bodies of the baby and two other rhinos, shot dead, their horns removed. "I'm not a one for talking about emotions," Uys said quietly. "But it was like seeing one of your family members dead, the brutality of it."
WORLD
November 19, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Wildlife groups react with shock to news of the discovery at the Letaba Ranch Game Reserve. South Africa has seen a major increase in rhino killings this year, with poachers armed with AK-47s frequently attacking the endangered animals. South African wildlife officials found the decomposing bodies of 18 rhinos ? all dehorned victims of poaching ? in a remote area of a large private game reserve close to the border of Kruger National Park, authorities said Friday. Wildlife organizations reacted with shock to news of the find at the 100,000-acre Letaba Ranch Game Reserve.
NEWS
November 19, 1986 | From Deutsche Press-Agentur
Patrols have killed 18 poachers in shootouts along the country's northern border with Zambia during a two-year-old "save the rhino" anti-poaching campaign, a national parks officer said here Tuesday. Fifteen more poachers--with automatic rifles, military camouflage uniforms and large quantities of ammunition--were captured in operations centered in the rugged bushlands of the Zambezi River Valley running through Zimbabwe, Zambia and Mozambique.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
The masterminds of an international rhinoceros horn smuggling ring pleaded guilty in a Los Angeles federal court to illegal wildlife trafficking, money laundering and tax evasion. The pleas Friday wrapped up the first phase of a nationwide crackdown on the lucrative horn trade to Asia. Vinh Chuong "Jimmy" Kha and Felix Kha, who have been jailed since their homes and import-export business in Garden Grove and Westminster were raided in February, probably face about five more years in prison under a plea agreement with federal prosecutors.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | ANDREW STEELE, REUTERS
The warming political climate in southern Africa is pushing a conservationist's dream closer to reality--creation of the world's biggest game park, straddling the continent from the Atlantic to the Indian Ocean. The dream envisions the dismantling of fences marking national boundaries to allow the continent's varied wildlife the freedom it once enjoyed to migrate across the African wilderness.
NEWS
December 7, 1986 | JOHN EDLIN, Associated Press
Zimbabwe has adopted paradoxical tactics to preserve its herds of rhinoceros and elephants. To save the rare black rhinos, one unit of rangers has been waging war on poachers, killing 11 who have come into Zimbabwe from neighboring Zambia in the last three years. But rangers have begun killing elephants in an annual cull of more than 4,000 of the animals to reduce their population.
NEWS
December 13, 2001 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The recent slaughter of four black rhinos at a national park in southeastern Kenya has reignited fears that a new round of poaching could further threaten one of the world's most endangered mammals. The killing of the rhinos, which included a mother and her calf, was the first such attack on the animals in eight years in one of Kenya's protected national parks.
OPINION
April 21, 2014 | Jonah Goldberg
On Good Friday, President Obama made a bad call. The State Department announced that it would delay its decision on the Keystone XL pipeline until after the Nebraska Supreme Court rules in a case involving the route. The administration insists the decision to punt has nothing to do with politics. Pretty much everyone else thinks otherwise. Obama, who is rarely reluctant to act unilaterally when it benefits him politically, and who regularly brags about his red-tape cutting, is paralyzed by perhaps the only big shovel-ready jobs project he's been presented with.
TRAVEL
June 4, 1989 | LARRY HABEGGER and JAMES O'REILLY, Habegger and O'Reilly are free-lance writers living in Northern California .
World Travel Watch is a monthly report designed to help you make informed judgments about travel throughout the world. Because conditions can change overnight, always make your own inquiries before you leave home. In the United States contact the nearest passport agency office; abroad, check in with the nearest American embassy . Asia --Bhutan: Either through an accident of history, geography or simply good planning, Bhutan has preserved its rich Buddhist culture and peaceful, agrarian way of life.
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