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Rhinoceros

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NEWS
December 9, 1987 | From Reuters
Organized gangs of poachers armed with sophisticated weapons are threatening the rare Indian one-horned rhinoceros with extinction within 10 years, a senior wildlife official said Tuesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Emmanuel Demarcy-Mota's smart, sleek production of Eugene Ionesco's "Rhinoceros" at Royce Hall was a sight for sore eyes over the weekend. Not that this offering from Théâtre de la Ville-Paris convinced me that the play is entirely deserving of its status as an absurdist classic. This may be the playwright's most popular effort, but it's hardly his most theatrically effective. Yet the return of international theater to UCLA is undeniably an occasion for rejoicing. Formerly known as UCLA Live (which housed the suspended International Theatre Festival)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1988 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
A rare, 2 1/2-ton Indian rhinoceros died at the Los Angeles Zoo after getting its head stuck in an 18-inch hole, officials said Thursday. In what Zoo Director Warren Thomas called "one of those unfortunate freak accidents," the 20-year-old rhino, while penned in a nighttime enclosure, stood on its hind legs and put its head in an opening about 8 feet off the ground. Zoo officials believe that the rhino, a female known as Rhada, died of shock, Thomas said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
Federal wildlife investigators in California and other states say they have cracked an international smuggling ring that trafficked for years in sawed-off rhinoceros horns, which fetch stratospheric prices in Vietnam and China for their supposed cancer-curing powers. More than 150 federal agents and other local enforcement officers raided homes and businesses and made several arrests in a dozen states over the weekend, including three alleged traffickers in Southern California. "By taking out this ring of rhino horn traffickers, we have shut down a major source of black market horn and dealt a serious blow to rhino horn smuggling both in the U.S. and globally," said U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | Associated Press
The sale, import and export of rhinoceros and tiger products would be banned under a bill the House passed by voice vote Tuesday. Tigers and rhinos are protected under the U.S. Endangered Species Act and by international treaties, but trade in their parts continues to flourish, particularly for Asian traditional medicines. Despite current restrictions, said Rep. Jim Saxton (R-N.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1990 | RAY LOYND
Neither New York nor Los Angeles boasts a gay and lesbian theater company that has the history and the clout to qualify as a cultural force. That's left to San Francisco. The largest operation and, by all accounts, the most successful gay and lesbian company in the country is Theatre Rhinoceros in San Francisco's Mission district. Work produced there is more professional and polished than at L.A.'s only exclusively gay and lesbian theater, the Celebration.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1996 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After seeing the first British production of Eugene Ionesco's absurdist comedy-drama "Rhinoceros," Noel Coward commented, "I am sick of these amateur pseudo-intellectual scribblings. Ionesco is not a particularly original thinker. He merely tries to be, which is fatal." Original Ionesco is not. Absurdist theater goes back to Alfred Jarry's "Ubu Roi" in 1895, and beyond that to Moliere and the Greeks.
NEWS
October 9, 1994 | Associated Press
The Senate gave final congressional approval early Saturday to legislation authorizing $10 million a year to help save the rhinoceros and tiger from extinction. Under the five-year program, which passed on a voice vote, the Interior Department would make grants to foreign governments and nonprofit groups that develop rhinoceros and tiger conservation programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1992 | RAY LOYND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's nothing like a dash of Eugene Ionesco's "Rhinoceros" to make us revel and shiver at the notion of life's enduring futility. A faithful revival of "Rhinoceros" (1960) should make mass psychosis appear almost exhilarating. And that's the insane appeal of the spirited production at the Celtic Arts Center.
NEWS
September 15, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The first birth of a Sumatran rhinoceros in captivity in 112 years is a landmark development in the effort to save the endangered species, wildlife experts said. The birth of the healthy male calf at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden culminated weeks of an anxious vigil by zoo employees and volunteers who watched monitors to collect information about the pregnant mother.
SCIENCE
September 2, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Searching across the Tibetan plateau, paleontologists have discovered a species of woolly rhinoceros that may be an ancestor of the great ice age beasts that roamed the plains of North America, Europe and Asia. The Coelodonta thibetana fossil dates to about 3.7 million years ago, about a million years before other known woolly rhinos. The findings, published in Friday's edition of the journal Science , lead researchers to believe that before the ice age began, the chilly Tibetan highlands may have served as an evolutionary cradle for cold-hardy mammals whose descendants thrived in the glacial times that followed.
FOOD
July 14, 2011 | By Charles Perry, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The typical barley wine is a winter drink, sweet, malty and potent. The contrarian Santa Barbara outfit Telegraph Brewing produces an eccentric version that stretches the definition by being made with rye malt rather than barley. Telegraph even refers to it as a rye wine; probably a category with only one member. It certainly is unique. The nose is basically clean and piney-fresh, though there's also a bit of ale fruit-and-funk quality. On the palate you notice a lot of malt sweetness combined with that elusive rye flavor that's slightly dry and usually gets compared to spiciness, plus a heady dose of alcohol.
NEWS
February 15, 2009 | Samantha Henry, Henry writes for the Associated Press.
Those who think flowers and chocolate are insufficient for their sweetie on Valentine's Day might try something a little more worldly -- like a rhinoceros tusk or poisonous fish. Consider the protein-packed Turkish "sultan's paste" or the "bring me love" bubble baths and essential oils sold at Latin American botanicas; almost every culture boasts its own kind of aphrodisiac. "You name it, someone has come up with something they hope is an aphrodisiac, because if you come up with the right formula, you win so big -- you get the girl, or get the boy," said Susan Fisher, a biological anthropologist at Rutgers University and the author of several books on love, chemistry and relationships.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2007 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
Television is something of a double-edged sword when it comes to picturing the natural world (if we may imagine television as a sword). It brings that world closer, yet never closer than the other side of a screen, giving you the impression that you are safe (and separate) from nature, but also that nature is safe from you. Nature isn't safe from you, however.
NEWS
February 13, 2003 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
Romance was in the air in Escondido as a dozen couples snuggled underneath heat lamps in the chilly evening air. There was Kaluha and Baileys for the coffee, red roses and chocolates for the ladies and rhino porn for everyone. Like so many productions in this genre, there really wasn't much of a story, but no one seemed to mind. The raw footage, edited for time, not for graphic content, simply showed two endangered Indian rhinos determined to do as nature intended.
NEWS
September 15, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The first birth of a Sumatran rhinoceros in captivity in 112 years is a landmark development in the effort to save the endangered species, wildlife experts said. The birth of the healthy male calf at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden culminated weeks of an anxious vigil by zoo employees and volunteers who watched monitors to collect information about the pregnant mother.
NEWS
September 18, 1993
A Bhutanese princess was arrested in Taiwan on Friday, accused of trying to smuggle 22 rhinoceros horns into the island in her luggage, an airport police spokesman said. Princess Deki Wangchuck, 43, was taken into custody and police recommended to prosecutors that she be charged with smuggling and violating conservation laws. It was one of Taiwan's biggest hauls of endangered wildlife parts. If charged and convicted, she could be sentenced to up to seven years in prison.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1997 | PHILIP BRANDES
You might think that if you've seen one "Rhinoceros" you've seen the whole herd, but Odyssey Theatre artistic director Ron Sossi is out to prove otherwise with a fresh, accessible production of Ionesco's absurdist classic. That he succeeds so well is creditable in large part to remarkable performances from his two principals: Alan Blumenfield as the smug, fastidious Jean, and Sam Anderson as his slovenly, inebriated friend Berenger.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | Associated Press
The sale, import and export of rhinoceros and tiger products would be banned under a bill the House passed by voice vote Tuesday. Tigers and rhinos are protected under the U.S. Endangered Species Act and by international treaties, but trade in their parts continues to flourish, particularly for Asian traditional medicines. Despite current restrictions, said Rep. Jim Saxton (R-N.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1997 | PHILIP BRANDES
You might think that if you've seen one "Rhinoceros" you've seen the whole herd, but Odyssey Theatre artistic director Ron Sossi is out to prove otherwise with a fresh, accessible production of Ionesco's absurdist classic. That he succeeds so well is creditable in large part to remarkable performances from his two principals: Alan Blumenfield as the smug, fastidious Jean, and Sam Anderson as his slovenly, inebriated friend Berenger.
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