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Rhinoceroses

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
One of the three northern white rhinos at the San Diego Zoo's Wild Animal Park has died, possibly of old age, officials announced Wednesday. Northern white rhinos are one of the world's most endangered species; only a dozen are known to exist. Nadi had been at the Wild Animal Park since 1972.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
One of the three northern white rhinos at the San Diego Zoo's Wild Animal Park has died, possibly of old age, officials announced Wednesday. Northern white rhinos are one of the world's most endangered species; only a dozen are known to exist. Nadi had been at the Wild Animal Park since 1972.
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NEWS
March 27, 1990 | Associated Press
Poachers hunting the rhinoceros for its so-called aphrodisiac horn have severely reduced the animal's population in West Bengal state, India's Environment Minister Maneka Gandhi said Monday. Only 39 rhinoceroses remain in the eastern state, compared to 88 in 1970, she told Parliament. At least 20 rhinos are killed each year in India. Their horns are removed and sent to Hong Kong or Singapore to be turned into powder and sold as an aphrodisiac.
WORLD
March 17, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
An expedition found evidence of at least 13 Sumatran rhinos deep in the jungles of northern Borneo, giving hope to conservationists that a species thought to be nearly extinct could flourish. The rhinos were tracked into the dense jungles of Sabah state on Borneo last year by a team of 120 government wildlife officials, academics and members of WWF-Malaysia, the World Wildlife Fund said. The survey team did not see any rhinos but found clear tracks of 13 individuals.
MAGAZINE
October 5, 1986
If we follow the logic set out on sea urchins by Gary Karasik in "A Prickly Question" (Aug. 17), it thus would be perfectly all right to slaughter elephants for their ivory and rhinoceroses for their horns. This is one of the best examples of the overinflated and chauvinistic human male ego: Only those that respond directly to his own needs could be regarded as worthy of his approval and, presumably, admiration. Kathleen Sweet Pasadena
NEWS
November 1, 1988
Poachers raided a special reserve and slaughtered at least five white rhinoceroses, eliminating the animals from Kenya's public lands, authorities said. The poachers escaped after hacking off the rhinos' valuable horns, highly sought after for use in traditional medicines and carvings. The night massacre occurred at Meru National Park, 140 miles northeast of the capital of Nairobi, said Minister of Tourism and Wildlife George Muhoho.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Trade in Rhinoceros Horn Ends: Once a major endangered species marketplace, Singapore has ended the last of its trade in rhinoceros horn. Since 1986, when it was pressured to join the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, Singapore has banned the import and export of rhinoceros products. But merchants were allowed to continue selling existing stocks. Fewer than 2,000 black rhinoceroses remain in Africa, down from 65,000 in 1970.
NEWS
August 25, 1989 | From Reuters
Government officials are wondering how to feed and dispose of hundreds of exotic animals--among them giraffes, zebras and elephants--found on a sprawling estate belonging to accused Medellin drug chieftain Pablo Escobar. It is costing thousands of dollars to feed them, and the government has been in contact with Colombian and foreign zoos to be ready offer the animals if no funds can be found to care for them properly, a senior government official said Thursday.
NEWS
January 5, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Randy Rieches looks at a "crash" of rhinoceroses grazing in the open space of the San Diego Wild Animal Park and explains why the park is engaged in an aggressive effort to breed and distribute the big beasts. "You have to keep this species in front of the public to keep awareness heightened about the trouble the rhino is in," said Rieches, the park's curator of mammals.
NEWS
December 17, 1996 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the San Diego Zoological Society last summer arranged to send two rare southern white rhinos from Pittsburgh to a zoo in China, the move was hailed as an example of international cooperation in the fight to save imperiled wildlife. But now the Chinese have confirmed the embarrassing secret that they and San Diego Zoo officials have kept for five months: the two 4,000-pound animals died of dehydration and heatstroke while being trucked along the 1,650-mile route from Shanghai to Chengdu.
WORLD
May 24, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Poachers electrocuted two rare rhinoceroses at India's Pabitora wildlife reserve by stringing a live wire across a path the animals were known to follow, said a park official. He said the poachers extracted the horn of one rhino before fleeing. The area is home to about 1,800 one-horned rhinos. Rhino horns sell for about $13,000 a pound and are used in traditional Asian medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2001 | JASON SONG
The rare black rhinoceros that died earlier this month at the Los Angeles Zoo may have had tuberculosis, officials said Friday. Tests conducted after the 24-year-old female, known as Sweet Pea, was euthanized Jan. 12 showed signs of the bacterial disease. Officials are unsure what type of tuberculosis--human, bovine, or another variety--the animal had. Only human and bovine forms of the disease pose a risk to humans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2001 | SARAH HALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sweet Pea, a rare black rhinoceros known to Los Angeles zookeepers for her penchant for apples and her sweet demeanor, was euthanized Friday after several months of battling an unknown disease, zoo officials said. The 24-year-old rhino, which weighed more than a ton, began experiencing health problems last summer, including a loss in weight and appetite coupled with anemia and chronic iron overload.
NEWS
January 5, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Randy Rieches looks at a "crash" of rhinoceroses grazing in the open space of the San Diego Wild Animal Park and explains why the park is engaged in an aggressive effort to breed and distribute the big beasts. "You have to keep this species in front of the public to keep awareness heightened about the trouble the rhino is in," said Rieches, the park's curator of mammals.
NEWS
December 17, 1996 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the San Diego Zoological Society last summer arranged to send two rare southern white rhinos from Pittsburgh to a zoo in China, the move was hailed as an example of international cooperation in the fight to save imperiled wildlife. But now the Chinese have confirmed the embarrassing secret that they and San Diego Zoo officials have kept for five months: the two 4,000-pound animals died of dehydration and heatstroke while being trucked along the 1,650-mile route from Shanghai to Chengdu.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first American trade sanctions aimed at protecting endangered species, the Clinton Administration said Monday that it will impose penalties against Taiwan for its failure to halt the use of tiger and rhinoceros products. The sanctions, the first against Taiwan for any reason, will bar American imports of wildlife products from the Asian nation. Their use reflects the growing attention being paid to environmental issues in world trade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2001 | JASON SONG
The rare black rhinoceros that died earlier this month at the Los Angeles Zoo may have had tuberculosis, officials said Friday. Tests conducted after the 24-year-old female, known as Sweet Pea, was euthanized Jan. 12 showed signs of the bacterial disease. Officials are unsure what type of tuberculosis--human, bovine, or another variety--the animal had. Only human and bovine forms of the disease pose a risk to humans.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first American trade sanctions aimed at protecting endangered species, the Clinton Administration said Monday that it will impose penalties against Taiwan for its failure to halt the use of tiger and rhinoceros products. The sanctions, the first against Taiwan for any reason, will bar American imports of wildlife products from the Asian nation. Their use reflects the growing attention being paid to environmental issues in world trade.
NEWS
December 17, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anna Merz is terrified. She hates speaking to large groups of people, given that she prefers animals. "I'm damn near phobic about it," she says, trembling ever so slightly while waiting to address an audience of fewer than two dozen at Clairemont High School. She is hoping to sell them on the dire need to save one of the world's most endangered species: The rhinoceros. Merz, 61, lives alone on a farm in Kenya. She shares 61,000 acres with four dogs, some chickens and 24 rhinos.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Trade in Rhinoceros Horn Ends: Once a major endangered species marketplace, Singapore has ended the last of its trade in rhinoceros horn. Since 1986, when it was pressured to join the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, Singapore has banned the import and export of rhinoceros products. But merchants were allowed to continue selling existing stocks. Fewer than 2,000 black rhinoceroses remain in Africa, down from 65,000 in 1970.
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