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Rhoda Grauer

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL
Ahhh, a new year and so many unknowns: Will Jay, Dave and Johnny be genetically spliced to produce the Ultimate Talk Show Host? Will the Yuppie-in-Chief name Stevie Nicks to run the NEA? Who will Sinead pick as her tag team partner against Madonna and the Pope? Will the activist group AWOE (Actresses With One Eyebrow) demand that one of them be chosen to play Frida Kahlo? Oh well, frivolity aside, one thing is certain: You'll be hearing these names and seeing these faces in the next 365.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL
Ahhh, a new year and so many unknowns: Will Jay, Dave and Johnny be genetically spliced to produce the Ultimate Talk Show Host? Will the Yuppie-in-Chief name Stevie Nicks to run the NEA? Who will Sinead pick as her tag team partner against Madonna and the Pope? Will the activist group AWOE (Actresses With One Eyebrow) demand that one of them be chosen to play Frida Kahlo? Oh well, frivolity aside, one thing is certain: You'll be hearing these names and seeing these faces in the next 365.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
If I could tell you what it meant, there would be no point in dancing it. --Isadora Duncan * Imagine an eight-hour PBS series about dance so dominated by talk that scarcely one full minute of dancing is ever allowed to be seen without voice-over commentary or a cutaway to an interview.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"If you understand someone's dance, you immediately start learning about their culture and their values," says Rhoda Grauer, creator and executive producer of "Dancing," an eight-part series premiering Monday on PBS. Filmed in 18 countries on five continents, "Dancing" focuses on the rules, taboos, messages and meanings that are formed when people dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, Lewis Segal is The Times' dance writer
Call it the year of the smorgasbord. In response to what seemed a crisis of both funding support and public interest, the American concert-dance community kept resorting to the variety-show format as a fix-all--perhaps counting on safety-in-numbers or feeling that a nation enslaved to the wireless remote control can't endure dance events unless they change radically every 15 minutes. The mixed bill is nothing new, of course. But the art of curatorship--a.k.a.
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