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April 27, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
Hours after listening to a radio account of the San Diego Padres' 1-0 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates, Rhoda Polley, longtime administrative assistant for the team, died at her San Diego home early Wednesday morning of complications from cancer and a stroke. Polley, 65, had managed the Padres' front office since 1979 and was known as a mother figure to many of the players. Her battle with cancer, which was discovered this winter in her hip, became a source of inspiration to several Padre veterans.
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SPORTS
April 27, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
Hours after listening to a radio account of the San Diego Padres' 1-0 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates, Rhoda Polley, longtime administrative assistant for the team, died at her San Diego home early Wednesday morning of complications from cancer and a stroke. Polley, 65, had managed the Padres' front office since 1979 and was known as a mother figure to many of the players. Her battle with cancer, which was discovered this winter in her hip, became a source of inspiration to several Padre veterans.
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SPORTS
April 26, 1989
Rhoda Polley, the former San Diego Padre administrative assistant whose fight with cancer has caused several Padres to dedicate their season to her, suffered a stroke Sunday night at her San Diego home, where she remains.
SPORTS
April 26, 1989
Rhoda Polley, the former San Diego Padre administrative assistant whose fight with cancer has caused several Padres to dedicate their season to her, suffered a stroke Sunday night at her San Diego home, where she remains.
SPORTS
April 12, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
The old lady and the kid. That's what they were to each other. Mark Parent was a runny-nosed 17-year-old baseball player who never should have left his high school coach, or his mother. Rhoda Polley was a retired legal secretary who had agreed to join the Padre front office as a general manager's assistant, sorting contracts, filing papers and, most of all, watching over kids such as Parent. The year was 1979; his first, her first. Remembers Parent: "She was the one person in the front office you could talk to."
SPORTS
April 19, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
The old lady and the kid. That's what they were to each other. Rhoda Polley was a retired legal secretary who had agreed to join the Padre front office as a general manager's assistant, sorting contracts, filing papers and, most of all, watching over young players. Mark Parent was a runny-nosed 17-year-old baseball player who never should have left his high school coach, or his mother. The year was 1979; her first, his first. Remembers Polley: "He was the one who received about four perfumed letters every day from his girlfriend.
SPORTS
April 27, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
Hours after listening to a radio account of the Padres' 1-0 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates Tuesday night, Rhoda Polley, longtime administrative assistant for the team, died in her San Diego home early Wednesday of complications from cancer and a stroke. She was 65. Polley had managed the Padre front office since 1979 and was known as a mother figure to many of the players. Her battle with cancer, which was discovered this winter in her hip, became a source of inspiration to several Padre veterans.
SPORTS
January 11, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
John Kruk, the Padre outfielder who in 1988 had the most disappointing season in his professional career, said last week that he lived the season in fear. Kruk said he was haunted by ongoing FBI surveillance amid an investigation and search for former hometown friend Roy Lee Plummer, who has been charged with beginning a spree of armed bank robberies shortly before moving into Kruk's rented home in San Diego following the 1987 season.
SPORTS
April 4, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
An otherwise dull spring for the highly regarded Padres was livened up by guesses among both players and observers as to the team's one or two major weaknesses. Some guessed third base. Others guessed outfield speed. In the regular-season opener Monday night, everyone finally found out what Jack McKeon thinks. The Padre manager offered his opinion loud and clear as the Padres fell, 5-3, to the San Francisco Giants in front of 50,480 at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium.
SPORTS
April 5, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
Look at it this way. If Tony Gwynn didn't hurl his body against the center-field wall to make a catch . . . if John Kruk didn't leap across the warning track to make a catch . . . if Roberto Alomar didn't swan dive into a line drive for a catch . . . if Tim Flannery didn't dig holes at third base to make three catches . . . the Padres would have lost, 15-3.
SPORTS
April 12, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
The old lady and the kid. That's what they were to each other. Mark Parent was a runny-nosed 17-year-old baseball player who never should have left his high school coach, or his mother. Rhoda Polley was a retired legal secretary who had agreed to join the Padre front office as a general manager's assistant, sorting contracts, filing papers and, most of all, watching over kids such as Parent. The year was 1979; his first, her first. Remembers Parent: "She was the one person in the front office you could talk to."
SPORTS
April 28, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
And their oldest and surliest shall lead them. Padre pitcher Ed Whitson was attempting to bunt in the second inning of Thursday night's 8-1 victory over Pittsburgh when Pirate pitcher Neal Heaton threw an inside pitch at his Adam's apple. Whitson dived back off the plate, then jumped up and glared at his bat. Then he glared at Heaton. Then he glared from left to right, arousing fear that he would not only charge Heaton, he would charge the entire team. One pitch later, he laid down a perfect bunt.
SPORTS
April 30, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
The people in the old brick neighborhood around Wrigley Field put up a good stink over the installation of lights here. They said late-night baseball would cause mayhem. They said it would attract thugs. On the first Saturday night game here, they were right. The Chicago Cubs and the Padres, in front of 34,748 witnesses, attacked and mugged the defenseless baseball. They batted it away with gloves. They pounded it with their bodies. And how they threw it: against railings, against walls and even off the thankfully hard head of one utility infielder.
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