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NEWS
March 9, 1991 | From Associated Press
No welfare checks were written Friday in Rhode Island. No criminals were prosecuted, no driver's licenses were issued or renewed, no legislation was passed and not a single lawyer filed a new case in state court. State government, the largest employer in Rhode Island, simply did not open. And it will do that nine more times before the end of the fiscal year on June 30 in an effort not to go broke. From state parks to the Statehouse, doors were locked and most workers were told to stay home.
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NEWS
March 9, 1991 | From Associated Press
No welfare checks were written Friday in Rhode Island. No criminals were prosecuted, no driver's licenses were issued or renewed, no legislation was passed and not a single lawyer filed a new case in state court. State government, the largest employer in Rhode Island, simply did not open. And it will do that nine more times before the end of the fiscal year on June 30 in an effort not to go broke. From state parks to the Statehouse, doors were locked and most workers were told to stay home.
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NEWS
March 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Bruce G. Sundlun said Rhode Island will move ahead with a 10-day government shutdown and hundreds of layoffs after unionized state workers rejected an alternative plan. Sundlun said the first day of the shutdown will be next Friday. The remaining days will fall primarily on Mondays and Fridays through the end of June. Union leaders vowed to go to court to stop the shutdown, but Sundlun said that if they prevail, he will be forced to lay off more state workers.
NEWS
March 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Bruce G. Sundlun said Rhode Island will move ahead with a 10-day government shutdown and hundreds of layoffs after unionized state workers rejected an alternative plan. Sundlun said the first day of the shutdown will be next Friday. The remaining days will fall primarily on Mondays and Fridays through the end of June. Union leaders vowed to go to court to stop the shutdown, but Sundlun said that if they prevail, he will be forced to lay off more state workers.
WORLD
October 16, 2010 | By Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times
With an escort of 60 officers with assault rifles, a convoy heads off to deliver pensions to people caught behind the siege line as one drug cartel tries to wait out another in a sinister battle for scores of human and drug trafficking routes into Arizona. The police chiefs met in the dusty plaza with a federal official clutching a black bag filled with pesos: $40,000 in government pensions for the senior citizens living in the pueblos of the nearby foothills. A convoy of seven vehicles rumbled into the plaza, the trucks squeezing between taco and T-shirt vendors who gawked at the 60 or so federal and state police officers toting assault rifles.
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